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Events matching "Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
Identifying the source of photographic images by analysis of JPEG quantization artifacts
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Matthew Sorell

Media...
In a forensic context, digital photographs are becoming more common as sources of evidence in criminal and civil matters. Questions that arise include identifying the make and model of a camera to assist in the gathering of physical evidence; matching photographs to a particular camera through the camera’s unique characteristics; and determining the integrity of a digital image, including whether the image contains steganographic information. From a digital file perspective, there is also the question of whether metadata has been deliberately modified to mislead the investigator, and in the case of multiple images, whether a timeline can be established from the various timestamps within the file, imposed by the operating system or determined by other image characteristics. This talk is concerned specifically with techniques to identify the make, model series and particular source camera model given a digital image. We exploit particular characteristics of the camera’s JPEG coder to demonstrate that such identification is possible, and that even when an image has subsequently been re-processed, there are often sufficient residual characteristics of the original coding to at least narrow down the possible camera models of interest.
Flooding in the Sundarbans
15:10 Fri 18 May, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Steve Need

Media...
The Sunderbans is a region of deltaic isles formed in the mouth of the Ganges River on the border between India and Bangladesh. As the largest mangrove forest in the world it is a world heritage site, however it is also home to several remote communities who have long inhabited some regions. Many of the inhabited islands are low-lying and are particularly vulnerable to flooding, a major hazard of living in the region. Determining suitable levels of protection to be provided to these communities relies upon accurate assessment of the flood risk facing these communities. Only recently the Indian Government commissioned a study into flood risk in the Sunderbans with a view to determine where flood protection needed to be upgraded.

Flooding due to rainfall is limited due to the relatively small catchment sizes, so the primary causes of flooding in the Sunderbans are unnaturally high tides, tropical cyclones (which regularly sweep through the bay of Bengal) or some combination of the two. Due to the link between tidal anomaly and drops in local barometric pressure, the two causes of flooding may be highly correlated. I propose stochastic methods for analysing the flood risk and present the early work of a case study which shows the direction of investigation. The strategy involves linking several components; a stochastic approximation to a hydraulic flood routing model, FARIMA and GARCH models for storm surge and a stochastic model for cyclone occurrence and tracking. The methods suggested are general and should have applications in other cyclone affected regions.

Modelling gene networks: the case of the quorum sensing network in bacteria.
15:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Adrian Koerber

The quorum sensing regulatory gene-network is employed by bacteria to provide a measure of their population-density and switch their behaviour accordingly. I will present an overview of quorum sensing in bacteria together with some of the modelling approaches I\'ve taken to describe this system. I will also discuss how this system relates to virulence and medical treatment, and the insights gained from the mathematics.
Finite Geometries: Classical Problems and Recent Developments
15:10 Fri 20 Jul, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Joseph A. Thas :: Ghent University, Belgium

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in finite projective spaces, and important applications to practical topics such as coding theory, cryptography and design of experiments have made the field even more attractive. In my talk some classical problems and recent developments will be discussed. First I will mention Segre's celebrated theorem and ovals and a purely combinatorial characterization of Hermitian curves in the projective plane over a finite field here, from the beginning, the considered pointset is contained in the projective plane over a finite field. Next, a recent elegant result on semiovals in PG(2,q), due to Gács, will be given. A second approach is where the object is described as an incidence structure satisfying certain properties; here the geometry is not a priori embedded in a projective space. This will be illustrated by a characterization of the classical inversive plane in the odd case. Another quite recent beautiful result in Galois geometry is the discovery of an infinite class of hemisystems of the Hermitian variety in PG(3,q^2), leading to new interesting classes of incidence structures, graphs and codes; before this result, just one example for GF(9), due to Segre, was known.
Regression: a backwards step?
13:10 Fri 7 Sep, 2007 :: Maths G08 :: Dr Gary Glonek

Media...
Most students of high school mathematics will have encountered the technique of fitting a line to data by least squares. Those who have taken a university statistics course will also have heard this method referred to as regression. However, it is not obvious from common dictionary definitions why this should be the case. For example, "reversion to an earlier or less advanced state or form". In this talk, the mathematical phenomenon that gave regression its name will be explained and will be shown to have implications in some unexpected contexts.
Similarity solutions for surface-tension driven flows
15:10 Fri 14 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof John Lister :: Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK

The breakup of a mass of fluid into drops is a ubiquitous phenomenon in daily life, the natural environment and technology, with common examples including a dripping tap, ocean spray and ink-jet printing. It is a feature of many generic industrial processes such as spraying, emulsification, aeration, mixing and atomisation, and is an undesirable feature in coating and fibre spinning. Surface-tension driven pinch-off and the subsequent recoil are examples of finite-time singularities in which the interfacial curvature becomes infinite at the point of disconnection. As a result, the flow near the point of disconnection becomes self-similar and independent of initial and far-field conditions. Similarity solutions will be presented for the cases of inviscid and very viscous flow, along with comparison to experiments. In each case, a boundary-integral representation can be used both to examine the time-dependent behaviour and as the basis of a modified Newton scheme for direct solution of the similarity equations.
Groundwater: using mathematics to solve our water crisis
13:10 Wed 9 Apr, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Michael Teubner

'The driest state in the driest continent' is how South Australia used to be described. And that was before the drought! Now we have severe water restrictions, dead lawns, and dying gardens. But this need not be the case. Mathematics to the rescue! Groundwater exists below much of the Adelaide metro area. We can store winter stormwater in the ground and use it when we need it in summer. But we need mathematical models to understand where groundwater exists, where we can inject stormwater and how much can be stored, and where we can extract it: all through mathematical models. Come along and see that we don't have a water problem, we have a water management problem.
The Mathematics of String Theory
15:10 Fri 2 May, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Peter Bouwknegt :: Department of Mathematics, ANU

String Theory has had, and continues to have, a profound impact on many areas of mathematics and vice versa. In this talk I want to address some relatively recent developments. In particular I will argue, following Witten and others, that D-brane charges take values in the K-theory of spacetime, rather than in integral cohomology as one might have expected. I will also explore the mathematical consequences of a particular symmetry, called T-duality, in this context. I will give an intuitive introduction into D-branes and K-theory. No prior knowledge about either String Theory, D-branes or K-theory is required.
Key Predistribution in Grid-Based Wireless Sensor Networks
15:10 Fri 12 Dec, 2008 :: Napier G03 :: Dr Maura Paterson :: Information Security Group at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Wireless sensors are small, battery-powered devices that are deployed to measure quantities such as temperature within a given region, then form a wireless network to transmit and process the data they collect. We discuss the problem of distributing symmetric cryptographic keys to the nodes of a wireless sensor network in the case where the sensors are arranged in a square or hexagonal grid, and we propose a key predistribution scheme for such networks that is based on Costas arrays. We introduce more general structures known as distinct-difference configurations, and show that they provide a flexible choice of parameters in our scheme, leading to more efficient performance than that achieved by prior schemes from the literature.
Impulsively generated drops
15:00 Fri 27 Feb, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof William Phillips :: Swinburne University of Technology

This talk is concerned with the evolution of an unbounded inviscid fluid-fluid interface subject to an axisymmetric impulse in pressure and how inertial, interfacial and gravitational forces affect that evolution. The construct was motivated by the occurrence of lung hemorrhage resulting from ultrasonic imaging and pursues the notion that bursts of ultrasound act to expel droplets that puncture the soft air-filled sacs in the lung plural surface allowing them to fill with blood. The evolution of the free surface is described by a boundary integral formulation which is integrated forward in time numerically. As the interface evolves, it is seen, depending upon the levels of gravity and surface tension, to form either axisymmetric surface jets, waves or droplets. Moreover the droplets may be spherical, inverted tear-shaped or pancake like. Also of interest is the finite time singularity which occurs when the drop pinches off; this is seen to be of the power law type with an exponent of 2/3.
String structures and characteristic classes for loop group bundles
13:10 Fri 1 May, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Mr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Chern-Weil homomorphism gives a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundles. In infinite dimensions, however, the standard theory fails due to analytical problems. In this talk I shall give a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundle with structure group the loop group of a compact group which side-steps these complications. This theory is inspired in some sense by results on the string class (a certain cohomology class on the base of a loop group bundle) which I shall outline.
Quadrature domains, p-Laplacian growth, and bubbles contracting in Hele-Shaw cells with a power-law fluid.
15:10 Mon 15 Jun, 2009 :: Napier LG24 :: Dr Scott McCue :: Queensland University Technology

The classical Hele-Shaw flow problem is related to Laplacian growth and null-quadrature domains. A generalisation is constructed for power-law fluids, governed by the p-Laplace equation, and a number of results are established that are analogous to the classical case. Both fluid clearance and bubble extinction is considered, and by considering two extremes of extinction behaviour, a rather complete asymptotic description of possible behaviours is found.
Nonlinear diffusion-driven flow in a stratified viscous fluid
15:00 Fri 26 Jun, 2009 :: Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Associate Prof Michael Page :: Monash University

In 1970, two independent studies (by Wunsch and Phillips) of the behaviour of a linear density-stratified viscous fluid in a closed container demonstrated a slow flow can be generated simply due to the container having a sloping boundary surface This remarkable motion is generated as a result of the curvature of the lines of constant density near any sloping surface, which in turn enables a zero normal-flux condition on the density to be satisfied along that boundary. When the Rayleigh number is large (or equivalently Wunsch's parameter $R$ is small) this motion is concentrated in the near vicinity of the sloping surface, in a thin `buoyancy layer' that has many similarities to an Ekman layer in a rotating fluid.

A number of studies have since considered the consequences of this type of `diffusively-driven' flow in a semi-infinite domain, including in the deep ocean and with turbulent effects included. More recently, Page & Johnson (2008) described a steady linear theory for the broader-scale mass recirculation in a closed container and demonstrated that, unlike in previous studies, it is possible for the buoyancy layer to entrain fluid from that recirculation. That work has since been extended (Page & Johnson, 2009) to the nonlinear regime of the problem and some of the similarities to and differences from the linear case will be described in this talk. Simple and elegant analytical solutions in the limit as $R \to 0$ still exist in some situations, and they will be compared with numerical simulations in a tilted square container at small values of $R$. Further work on both the unsteady flow properties and the flow for other geometrical configurations will also be described.

Curved pipe flow and its stability
15:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2009 :: Badger labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The unsteady flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe is a widely occuring and well studied problem. The stability of such flows, however, has largely been overlooked; this is in marked contrast to flow through a straight-pipe, examination of which forms a cornerstone of hydrodynamic stability theory. Importantly, however, flow through a curved pipe exhibits an array of flow structures that are simply not present in the zero curvature limit, and it is natural to expect these to substantially impact upon the flow's stability. By considering two very different kinds of flows through a curved pipe, we illustrate that this can indeed be the case.
Analytic torsion for twisted de Rham complexes
13:10 Fri 30 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

We define analytic torsion for the twisted de Rham complex, consisting of differential forms on a compact Riemannian manifold X with coefficients in a flat vector bundle E, with a differential given by a flat connection on E plus a closed odd degree differential form on X. The definition in our case is more complicated than in the case discussed by Ray-Singer, as it uses pseudodifferential operators. We show that this analytic torsion is independent of the choice of metrics on X and E, establish some basic functorial properties, and compute it in many examples. We also establish the relationship of an invariant version of analytic torsion for T-dual circle bundles with closed 3-form flux. This is joint work with Siye Wu.
Upper bounds for the essential dimension of the moduli stack of SL_n-bundles over a curve
11:10 Mon 14 Dec, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Nicole Lemire :: University of Western Ontario, Canada

In joint work with Ajneet Dhillon, we find upper bounds for the essential dimension of various moduli stacks of SL_n-bundles over a curve. When n is a prime power, our calculation computes the essential dimension of the moduli stack of stable bundles exactly and the essential dimension is not equal to the dimension in this case.
A solution to the Gromov-Vaserstein problem
15:10 Fri 29 Jan, 2010 :: Engineering North N 158 Chapman Lecture Theatre :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Berne, Switzerland

Any matrix in $SL_n (\mathbb C)$ can be written as a product of elementary matrices using the Gauss elimination process. If instead of the field of complex numbers, the entries in the matrix are elements of a more general ring, this becomes a delicate question. In particular, rings of complex-valued functions on a space are interesting cases. A deep result of Suslin gives an affirmative answer for the polynomial ring in $m$ variables in case the size $n$ of the matrix is at least 3. In the topological category, the problem was solved by Thurston and Vaserstein. For holomorphic functions on $\mathbb C^m$, the problem was posed by Gromov in the 1980s. We report on a complete solution to Gromov's problem. A main tool is the Oka-Grauert-Gromov h-principle in complex analysis. Our main theorem can be formulated as follows: In the absence of obvious topological obstructions, the Gauss elimination process can be performed in a way that depends holomorphically on the matrix. This is joint work with Bj\"orn Ivarsson.
Proper holomorphic maps from strongly pseudoconvex domains to q-convex manifolds
13:10 Fri 5 Feb, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

(Joint work with B. Drinovec Drnovsek, Amer. J. Math., in press.) I will discuss the existence of closed complex subvarieties of a complex manifold X that are proper holomorphic images of strongly pseudoconvex Stein domains. The main sufficient condition is expressed in terms of the Morse indices and of the number of positive Levi eigenvalues of an exhaustion function on X. Examples show that our condition cannot be weakened in general. I will describe optimal results for subvarieties of this type in complements of compact complex submanifolds with Griffiths positive normal bundle; in the projective case these generalize classical theorems of Remmert, Bishop and Narasimhan concerning proper holomorphic maps and embeddings to complex Euclidean spaces.
Loop groups and characteristic classes
13:10 Fri 23 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

Suppose $G$ is a compact Lie group, $LG$ its (free) loop group and $\Omega G \subseteq LG$ its based loop group. Let $P \to M$ be a principal bundle with structure group one of these loop groups. In general, differential form representatives of characteristic classes for principal bundles can be easily obtained using the Chern-Weil homomorphism, however for infinite-dimensional bundles such as $P$ this runs into analytical problems and classes are more difficult to construct. In this talk I will explain some new results on characteristic classes for loop group bundles which demonstrate how to construct certain classes---which we call string classes---for such bundles. These are obtained by making heavy use of a certain $G$-bundle associated to any loop group bundle (which allows us to avoid the problems of dealing with infinite-dimensional bundles). We shall see that the free loop group case naturally involves equivariant cohomology.
Estimation of sparse Bayesian networks using a score-based approach
15:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: University of Copenhagen

The estimation of Bayesian networks given high-dimensional data sets, with more variables than there are observations, has been the focus of much recent research. These structures provide a flexible framework for the representation of the conditional independence relationships of a set of variables, and can be particularly useful in the estimation of genetic regulatory networks given gene expression data.

In this talk, I will discuss some new research on learning sparse networks, that is, networks with many conditional independence restrictions, using a score-based approach. In the case of genetic regulatory networks, such sparsity reflects the view that each gene is regulated by relatively few other genes. The presented approach allows prior information about the overall sparsity of the underlying structure to be included in the analysis, as well as the incorporation of prior knowledge about the connectivity of individual nodes within the network.

Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
The mathematics of theoretical inference in cognitive psychology
15:10 Fri 11 Jun, 2010 :: Napier LG24 :: Prof John Dunn :: University of Adelaide

The aim of psychology in general, and of cognitive psychology in particular, is to construct theoretical accounts of mental processes based on observed changes in performance on one or more cognitive tasks. The fundamental problem faced by the researcher is that these mental processes are not directly observable but must be inferred from changes in performance between different experimental conditions. This inference is further complicated by the fact that performance measures may only be monotonically related to the underlying psychological constructs. State-trace analysis provides an approach to this problem which has gained increasing interest in recent years. In this talk, I explain state-trace analysis and discuss the set of mathematical issues that flow from it. Principal among these are the challenges of statistical inference and an unexpected connection to the mathematics of oriented matroids.
Principal Component Analysis Revisited
15:10 Fri 15 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Assoc. Prof Inge Koch :: University of Adelaide

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been an important tool in the analysis of multivariate data. The principal components summarise data in fewer than the original number of variables without losing essential information, and thus allow a split of the data into signal and noise components. PCA is a linear method, based on elegant mathematical theory. The increasing complexity of data together with the emergence of fast computers in the later parts of the 20th century has led to a renaissance of PCA. The growing numbers of variables (in particular, high-dimensional low sample size problems), non-Gaussian data, and functional data (where the data are curves) are posing exciting challenges to statisticians, and have resulted in new research which extends the classical theory. I begin with the classical PCA methodology and illustrate the challenges presented by the complex data that we are now able to collect. The main part of the talk focuses on extensions of PCA: the duality of PCA and the Principal Coordinates of Multidimensional Scaling, Sparse PCA, and consistency results relating to principal components, as the dimension grows. We will also look at newer developments such as Principal Component Regression and Supervised PCA, nonlinear PCA and Functional PCA.
Arbitrage bounds for weighted variance swap prices
15:05 Fri 3 Dec, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mark Davis :: Imperial College London

This paper builds on earlier work by Davis and Hobson (Mathematical Finance, 2007) giving model-free---except for a 'frictionless markets' assumption--- necessary and sufficient conditions for absence of arbitrage given a set of current-time put and call options on some underlying asset. Here we suppose that the prices of a set of put options, all maturing at the same time, are given and satisfy the conditions for consistency with absence of arbitrage. We now add a path-dependent option, specifically a weighted variance swap, to the set of traded assets and ask what are the conditions on its time-0 price under which consistency with absence of arbitrage is maintained. In the present work, we work under the extra modelling assumption that the underlying asset price process has continuous paths. In general, we find that there is always a non- trivial lower bound to the range of arbitrage-free prices, but only in the case of a corridor swap do we obtain a finite upper bound. In the case of, say, the vanilla variance swap, a finite upper bound exists when there are additional traded European options which constrain the left wing of the volatility surface in appropriate ways.
Queues with skill based routing under FCFS–ALIS regime
15:10 Fri 11 Feb, 2011 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gideon Weiss :: The University of Haifa, Israel

We consider a system where jobs of several types are served by servers of several types, and a bipartite graph between server types and job types describes feasible assignments. This is a common situation in manufacturing, call centers with skill based routing, matching of parent-child in adoption or matching in kidney transplants etc. We consider the case of first come first served policy: jobs are assigned to the first available feasible server in order of their arrivals. We consider two types of policies for assigning customers to idle servers - a random assignment and assignment to the longest idle server (ALIS) We survey some results for four different situations:

  • For a loss system we find conditions for reversibility and insensitivity.
  • For a manufacturing type system, in which there is enough capacity to serve all jobs, we discuss a product form solution and waiting times.
  • For an infinite matching model in which an infinite sequence of customers of IID types, and infinite sequence of servers of IID types are matched according to first come first, we obtain a product form stationary distribution for this system, which we use to calculate matching rates.
  • For a call center model with overload and abandonments we make some plausible observations.

This talk surveys joint work with Ivo Adan, Rene Caldentey, Cor Hurkens, Ed Kaplan and Damon Wischik, as well as work by Jeremy Visschers, Rishy Talreja and Ward Whitt.

Spherical tube hypersurfaces
13:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

We consider smooth real hypersurfaces in a complex vector space. Specifically, we are interested in tube hypersurfaces, i.e., hypersurfaces represented as the direct product of the imaginary part of the space and hypersurfaces lying in its real part. Tube hypersurfaces arise, for instance, as the boundaries of tube domains. The study of tube domains is a classical subject in several complex variables and complex geometry, which goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. Indeed, already Siegel found it convenient to realise certain symmetric domains as tubes. One can endow a tube hypersurface with a so-called CR-structure, which is the remnant of the complex structure on the ambient vector space. We impose on the CR-structure the condition of sphericity. One way to state this condition is to require a certain curvature (called the CR-curvature of the hypersurface) to vanish identically. Spherical tube hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties and are of interest from both the complex-geometric and affine-geometric points of view. I my talk I will give an overview of the theory of such hypersurfaces. In particular, I will mention an algebraic construction arising from this theory that has applications in abstract commutative algebra and singularity theory. I will speak about these applications in detail in my colloquium talk later today.
Algebraic hypersurfaces arising from Gorenstein algebras
15:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

Media...
To every Gorenstein algebra of finite dimension greater than 1 over a field of characteristic zero, and a projection on its maximal ideal with range equal to the annihilator of the ideal, one can associate a certain algebraic hypersurface lying in the ideal. Such hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties. They can be used, for instance, to help decide whether two given Gorenstein algebras are isomorphic, which for the case of complex numbers leads to interesting consequences in singularity theory. Also, for the case of real numbers such hypersurfaces naturally arise in CR-geometry. In my talk I will discuss these hypersurfaces and some of their applications.
The Extended-Domain-Eigenfunction Method: making old mathematics work for new problems
15:10 Fri 13 May, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Stan Miklavcic :: University of South Australia

Media...
Standard analytical solutions to elliptic boundary value problems on asymmetric domains are rarely, if ever, obtainable. Several years ago I proposed a solution technique to cope with such complicated domains. It involves the embedding of the original domain into one with simple boundaries where the classical eigenfunction solution approach can be used. The solution in the larger domain, when restricted to the original domain is then the solution of the original boundary value problem. In this talk I will present supporting theory for this idea, some numerical results for the particular case of the Laplace equation and the Stokes flow equations in two-dimensions and discuss advantages and limitations of the proposal.
Knots, posets and sheaves
13:10 Fri 20 May, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Brent Everitt :: University of York

The Euler characteristic is a nice simple integer invariant that one can attach to a space. Unfortunately, it is not natural: maps between spaces do not induce maps between their Euler characteristics, because it makes no sense to talk of a map between integers. This shortcoming is fixed by homology. Maps between spaces induce maps between their homologies, with the Euler characteristic encoded inside the homology. Recently it has become possible to play the same game with knots and the Jones polynomial: the Khovanov homology of a knot both encodes the Jones polynomial and is a natural invariant of the knot. After saying what all this means, this talk will observe that Khovanov homology is just a special case of sheaf homology on a poset, and we will explore some of the ramifications of this observation. This is joint work with Paul Turner (Geneva/Fribourg).
Lifting principal bundles and abelian extensions
13:10 Fri 27 May, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Prof Michael Murray :: School of Mathematical Sciences

I will review what it means to lift the structure group of a principal bundle and the topological obstruction to this in the case of a central extension. I will then discuss some new results in the case of abelian extensions.
From group action to Kontsevich's Swiss-Cheese conjecture through categorification
15:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

Media...
The Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture is a deep generalization of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains which plays an important role in the deformation quantization theory. Categorification is a method of thinking about mathematics by replacing set theoretical concepts by some higher dimensional objects. Categorification is somewhat of an art because there is no exact recipe for doing this. It is, however, a very powerful method of understanding (and producing) many deep results starting from simple facts we learned as undergraduate students. In my talk I will explain how Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture can be easily understood as a special case of categorification of a very familiar statement: an action of a group G (more generally, a monoid) on a set X is the same as group homomorphism from G to the group of automorphisms of X (monoid of endomorphisms of X in the case of a monoid action).
Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part I)
09:30 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part II)
10:50 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Object oriented data analysis
14:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Object Oriented Data Analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of Functional Data Analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal components analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie Groups and Symmetric Spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for Object Oriented Data Analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. Even in situations where Euclidean analysis makes sense, there are statistical challenges because of the High Dimension Low Sample Size problem, which motivates a new type of asymptotics leading to non-standard mathematical statistics.
Horocycle flows at prime times
13:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

The distribution of individual orbits of unipotent flows in homogeneous spaces are well understood thanks to the work work of Marina Ratner. It is conjectured that this property is preserved on restricting the times from the integers to primes, this being important in the study of prime numbers as well as in such dynamics. We review progress in understanding this conjecture, starting with Dirichlet (a finite system), Vinogradov (rotation of a circle or torus), Green and Tao (translation on a nilmanifold) and Ubis and Sarnak (horocycle flows in the semisimple case).
Deformations of Oka manifolds
13:10 Fri 26 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

We discuss the behaviour of the Oka property with respect to deformations of compact complex manifolds. We have recently proved that in a family of compact complex manifolds, the set of Oka fibres corresponds to a G_delta subset of the base. We have also found a necessary and sufficient condition for the limit fibre of a sequence of Oka fibres to be Oka in terms of a new uniform Oka property. The special case when the fibres are tori will be considered, as well as the general case of holomorphic submersions with noncompact fibres.
Oka properties of some hypersurface complements
13:10 Fri 2 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

Oka manifolds can be viewed as the "opposite" of Kobayashi hyperbolic manifolds. Kobayashi conjectured that the complement of a generic algebraic hypersurface of sufficiently high degree is hyperbolic. Therefore it is natural to ask whether the complement is Oka for the case of low degree or non-algebraic hypersurfaces. We provide a complete answer to this question for complements of hyperplane arrangements, and some results for graphs of meromorphic functions.
Twisted Morava K-theory
13:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

Morava's extraordinary K-theories K(n) are a family of generalized cohomology theories which behave in some ways like K-theory (indeed, K(1) is mod 2 K-theory). Their construction exploits Quillen's description of cobordism in terms of formal group laws and Lubin-Tate's methods in class field theory for constructing abelian extensions of number fields. Constructed from homotopy-theoretic methods, they do not admit a geometric description (like deRham cohomology, K-theory, or cobordism), but are nonetheless subtle, computable invariants of topological spaces. In this talk, I will give an introduction to these theories, and explain how it is possible to define an analogue of twisted K-theory in this setting. Traditionally, K-theory is twisted by a three-dimensional cohomology class; in this case, K(n) admits twists by (n+2)-dimensional classes. This work is joint with Hisham Sati.
T-duality via bundle gerbes I
13:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Estimating transmission parameters for the swine flu pandemic
15:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Kathryn Glass :: Australian National University

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Following the onset of a new strain of influenza with pandemic potential, policy makers need specific advice on how fast the disease is spreading, who is at risk, and what interventions are appropriate for slowing transmission. Mathematical models play a key role in comparing interventions and identifying the best response, but models are only as good as the data that inform them. In the early stages of the 2009 swine flu outbreak, many researchers estimated transmission parameters - particularly the reproduction number - from outbreak data. These estimates varied, and were often biased by data collection methods, misclassification of imported cases or as a result of early stochasticity in case numbers. I will discuss a number of the pitfalls in achieving good quality parameter estimates from early outbreak data, and outline how best to avoid them. One of the early indications from swine flu data was that children were disproportionately responsible for disease spread. I will introduce a new method for estimating age-specific transmission parameters from both outbreak and seroprevalence data. This approach allows us to take account of empirical data on human contact patterns, and highlights the need to allow for asymmetric mixing matrices in modelling disease transmission between age groups. Applied to swine flu data from a number of different countries, it presents a consistent picture of higher transmission from children.
T-duality via bundle gerbes II
13:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Mathematical opportunities in molecular space
15:10 Fri 28 Oct, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Aaron Thornton :: CSIRO

The study of molecular motion, interaction and space at the nanoscale has become a powerful tool in the area of gas separation, storage and conversion for efficient energy solutions. Modeling in this field has typically involved highly iterative computational algorithms such as molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics. Mathematical formulae in the form of analytical solutions to this field offer a range of useful and insightful advantages including optimization, bifurcation analysis and standardization. Here we present a few case scenarios where mathematics has provided insight and opportunities for further investigation.
Noncritical holomorphic functions of finite growth on algebraic Riemann surfaces
13:10 Fri 3 Feb, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

Given a compact Riemann surface X and a point p in X, we construct a holomorphic function without critical points on the punctured (algebraic) Riemann surface R=X-p which is of finite order at the point p. In the case at hand this improves the 1967 theorem of Gunning and Rossi to the effect that every open Riemann surface admits a noncritical holomorphic function, but without any particular growth condition. (Joint work with Takeo Ohsawa.)
Instability in standing waves in inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrodinger equations
13:10 Fri 30 Mar, 2012 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Robert Marangell :: The University of Sydney

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In this talk, I will describe a mechanism for determining instability of standing wave solutions to a class of inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equations. The inhomogeneity in this case means that the equations will spatially alternate between NLS and the so-called Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Such equations are useful in 1-D models of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BECs). The mechanism is inherently topological and therefore robust, leading to its application to a number of different soliton solutions, such as gap solitons, surface gap solitons, and dark soliton among others.
Bundle gerbes and the Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly
13:10 Fri 30 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly arises in the quantisation of fermions interacting with external gauge potentials. Mathematically, it can be described as a certain lifting problem for an extension of groups. The theory of bundle gerbes is very useful for studying lifting problems, however it only applies in the case of a central extension whereas in the study of the FMS anomaly the relevant extension is non-central. In this talk I will explain how to describe this anomaly indirectly using bundle gerbes and how to use a generalisation of bundle gerbes to describe the (non-central) lifting problem directly. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati, Michael Murray and Danny Stevenson.
Spatial-point data sets and the Polya distribution
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Benjamin Binder :: The University of Adelaide

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Spatial-point data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems and mathematical models, can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in equally sized bins. We find that the bin counts are related to the Polya distribution. New indexes are developed which quantify whether or not a spatial data set is at its most evenly distributed state. Using three case studies (Lagrangian fluid particles in chaotic laminar flows, cellular automata agents in discrete models, and biological cells within colonies), we calculate the indexes and predict the spatial-state of the system.
Geometric modular representation theory
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Anthony Henderson :: University of Sydney

Representation theory is one of the oldest areas of algebra, but many basic questions in it are still unanswered. This is especially true in the modular case, where one considers vector spaces over a field F of positive characteristic; typically, complications arise for particular small values of the characteristic. For example, from a vector space V one can construct the symmetric square S^2(V), which is one easy example of a representation of the group GL(V). One would like to say that this representation is irreducible, but that statement is not always true: if F has characteristic 2, there is a nontrivial invariant subspace. Even for GL(V), we do not know the dimensions of all irreducible representations in all characteristics. In this talk, I will introduce some of the main ideas of geometric modular representation theory, a more recent approach which is making progress on some of these old problems. Essentially, the strategy is to re-formulate everything in terms of homology of various topological spaces, where F appears only as the field of coefficients and the spaces themselves are independent of F; thus, the modular anomalies in representation theory arise because homology with modular coefficients is detecting something about the topology that rational coefficients do not. In practice, the spaces are usually varieties over the complex numbers, and homology is replaced by intersection cohomology to take into account the singularities of these varieties.
Enhancing the Jordan canonical form
15:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Anthony Henderson :: The University of Sydney

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In undergraduate linear algebra, we teach the Jordan canonical form theorem: that every similarity class of n x n complex matrices contains a special matrix which is block-diagonal with each block having a very simple form (a single eigenvalue repeated down the diagonal, ones on the super-diagonal, and zeroes elsewhere). This is of course very useful for matrix calculations. After explaining some of the general context of this result, I will focus on a case which, despite its close proximity to the Jordan canonical form theorem, has only recently been worked out: the classification of pairs of a vector and a matrix.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
Comparison of spectral and wavelet estimators of transfer function for linear systems
12:10 Mon 18 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Mohd Aftar Abu Bakar :: University of Adelaide

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We compare spectral and wavelet estimators of the response amplitude operator (RAO) of a linear system, with various input signals and added noise scenarios. The comparison is based on a model of a heaving buoy wave energy device (HBWED), which oscillates vertically as a single mode of vibration linear system. HBWEDs and other single degree of freedom wave energy devices such as the oscillating wave surge convertors (OWSC) are currently deployed in the ocean, making single degree of freedom wave energy devices important systems to both model and analyse in some detail. However, the results of the comparison relate to any linear system. It was found that the wavelet estimator of the RAO offers no advantage over the spectral estimators if both input and response time series data are noise free and long time series are available. If there is noise on only the response time series, only the wavelet estimator or the spectral estimator that uses the cross-spectrum of the input and response signals in the numerator should be used. For the case of noise on only the input time series, only the spectral estimator that uses the cross-spectrum in the denominator gives a sensible estimate of the RAO. If both the input and response signals are corrupted with noise, a modification to both the input and response spectrum estimates can provide a good estimator of the RAO. However, a combination of wavelet and spectral methods is introduced as an alternative RAO estimator. The conclusions apply for autoregressive emulators of sea surface elevation, impulse, and pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS) inputs. However, a wavelet estimator is needed in the special case of a chirp input where the signal has a continuously varying frequency.
Complex geometry and operator theory
14:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Ron Douglas :: Texas A&M University

In the study of bounded operators on Hilbert spaces of holomorphic functions, concepts and techniques from complex geometry are important. An anti-holomorphic bundle exists on which one can define the Chern connection. Its curvature turns out to be a complete invariant and various operator notions can't be reframed in terms of geometrical ones which leads to the solution of some problems. We will discuss this approach with an emphasis on natural examples in the one and multivariable case.
Infectious diseases modelling: from biology to public health policy
15:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr James McCaw :: The University of Melbourne

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The mathematical study of human-to-human transmissible pathogens has established itself as a complementary methodology to the traditional epidemiological approach. The classic susceptible--infectious--recovered model paradigm has been used to great effect to gain insight into the epidemiology of endemic diseases such as influenza and pertussis, and the emergence of novel pathogens such as SARS and pandemic influenza. The modelling paradigm has also been taken within the host and used to explain the within-host dynamics of viral (or bacterial or parasite) infections, with implications for our understanding of infection, emergence of drug resistance and optimal drug-interventions. In this presentation I will provide an overview of the mathematical paradigm used to investigate both biological and epidemiological infectious diseases systems, drawing on case studies from influenza, malaria and pertussis research. I will conclude with a summary of how infectious diseases modelling has assisted the Australian government in developing its pandemic preparedness and response strategies.
Boundary-layer transition and separation over asymmetrically textured spherical surfaces
12:30 Mon 27 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Adam Tunney :: University of Adelaide

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The game of cricket is unique among ball sports by the ignorant exploitation of \thetitle in the practice of swing bowling, often referred to as a "mysterious art". I will talk a bit about the Magnus effect exploited in inferior sports, the properties of a cricket ball that allow swing bowling, and the explanation of three modes of swing (conventional, contrast and reverse). Following that there will be some discussion on how I plan to use mathematics to turn this "art" into science.
Holomorphic flexibility properties of compact complex surfaces
13:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will describe recent joint work with Franc Forstneric (arXiv, July 2012). We introduce a new property, called the stratified Oka property, which fits into a hierarchy of anti-hyperbolicity properties that includes the Oka property. We show that stratified Oka manifolds are strongly dominable by affine spaces. It follows that Kummer surfaces are strongly dominable. We determine which minimal surfaces of class VII are Oka (assuming the global spherical shell conjecture). We deduce that the Oka property and several other anti-hyperbolicity properties are in general not closed in families of compact complex manifolds. I will summarise what is known about how the Oka property fits into the Enriques-Kodaira classification of surfaces.
Principal Component Analysis (PCA)
12:30 Mon 3 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Lyron Winderbaum :: University of Adelaide

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Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has become something of a buzzword recently in a number of disciplines including the gene expression and facial recognition. It is a classical, and fundamentally simple, concept that has been around since the early 1900's, its recent popularity largely due to the need for dimension reduction techniques in analyzing high dimensional data that has become more common in the last decade, and the availability of computing power to implement this. I will explain the concept, prove a result, and give a couple of examples. The talk should be accessible to all disciplines as it (should?) only assume first year linear algebra, the concept of a random variable, and covariance.
Krylov Subspace Methods or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love GMRes
12:10 Mon 17 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

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Many problems within applied mathematics require the solution of a linear system of equations. For instance, models of arterial umbilical blood flow are obtained through a finite element approximation, resulting in a linear, n x n system. For small systems the solution is (almost) trivial, but what happens when n is large? Say, n ~ 10^6? In this case matrix inversion is expensive (read: completely impractical) and we seek approximate solutions in a reasonable time. In this talk I will discuss the basic theory underlying Krylov subspace methods; a class of non-stationary iterative methods which are currently the methods-of-choice for large, sparse, linear systems. In particular I will focus on the method of Generalised Minimum RESiduals (GMRes), which is of the most popular for nonsymmetric systems. It is hoped that through this presentation I will convince you that a) solving linear systems is not necessarily trivial, and that b) my lack of any tangible results is not (entirely) a result of my own incompetence.
The advection-diffusion-reaction equation on the surface of the sphere
12:10 Mon 24 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Kale Davies :: University of Adelaide

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We aim to solve the advection-diffusion-reaction equation on the surface of a sphere. In order to do this we will be required to utilise spherical harmonics, a set of solutions to Laplace's equation in spherical coordinates. Upon solving the equations, we aim to find a set of parameters that cause a localised concentration to be maintained in the flow, referred to as a hotspot. In this talk I will discuss the techniques that are required to numerically solve this problem and the issues that occur/how to deal with these issues when searching for hotspot solutions.
Electrokinetics of concentrated suspensions of spherical particles
15:10 Fri 28 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Bronwyn Bradshaw-Hajek :: University of South Australia

Electrokinetic techniques are used to gather specific information about concentrated dispersions such as electronic inks, mineral processing slurries, pharmaceutical products and biological fluids (e.g. blood). But, like most experimental techniques, intermediate quantities are measured, and consequently the method relies explicitly on theoretical modelling to extract the quantities of experimental interest. A self-consistent cell-model theory of electrokinetics can be used to determine the electrical conductivity of a dense suspension of spherical colloidal particles, and thereby determine the quantities of interest (such as the particle surface potential). The numerical predictions of this model compare well with published experimental results. High frequency asymptotic analysis of the cell-model leads to some interesting conclusions.
The space of cubic rational maps
13:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

For each natural number d, the space of rational maps of degree d on the Riemann sphere has the structure of a complex manifold. The topology of these manifolds has been extensively studied. The recent development of Oka theory raises some new and interesting questions about their complex structure. We apply geometric invariant theory to the degree 3 case, studying a double action of the Mobius group on the space of cubic rational maps. We show that the categorical quotient is C, and that the space of cubic rational maps enjoys the holomorphic flexibility properties of strong dominability and C-connectedness.
Asymptotic independence of (simple) two-dimensional Markov processes
15:10 Fri 1 Mar, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Guy Latouche :: Universite Libre de Bruxelles

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The one-dimensional birth-and death model is one of the basic processes in applied probability but difficulties appear as one moves to higher dimensions. In the positive recurrent case, the situation is singularly simplified if the stationary distribution has product-form. We investigate the conditions under which this property holds, and we show how to use the knowledge to find product-form approximations for otherwise unmanageable random walks. This is joint work with Masakiyo Miyazawa and Peter Taylor.
Twistor space for rolling bodies
12:10 Fri 15 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Pawel Nurowski :: University of Warsaw

We consider a configuration space of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, and identify it with an open subset U of R^5, equipped with a generic distribution D of 2-planes. We will discuss symmetry properties of the pair (U,D) and will mention that, in the case of the two solids being balls, when changing the ratio of their radii, the dimension of the group of local symmetries unexpectedly jumps from 6 to 14. This occurs for only one such ratio, and in such case the local group of symmetries of the pair (U,D) is maximal. It is maximal not only among the balls with various radii, but more generally among all (U,D)s corresponding to configuration spaces of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting. This maximal group is isomorphic to the split real form of the exceptional Lie group G2. In the remaining part of the talk we argue how to identify the space U from the pair (U,D) defined above with the bundle T of totally null real 2-planes over a 4-manifold equipped with a split signature metric. We call T the twistor bundle for rolling bodies. We show that the rolling distribution D, can be naturally identified with an appropriately defined twistor distribution on T. We use this formulation of the rolling system to find more surfaces which, when rigidly rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, have the local group of symmetries isomorphic to the exceptional group G2.
On the chromatic number of a random hypergraph
13:10 Fri 22 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Dr Catherine Greenhill :: University of New South Wales

A hypergraph is a set of vertices and a set of hyperedges, where each hyperedge is a subset of vertices. A hypergraph is r-uniform if every hyperedge contains r vertices. A colouring of a hypergraph is an assignment of colours to vertices such that no hyperedge is monochromatic. When the colours are drawn from the set {1,..,k}, this defines a k-colouring. We consider the problem of k-colouring a random r-uniform hypergraph with n vertices and cn edges, where k, r and c are constants and n tends to infinity. In this setting, Achlioptas and Naor showed that for the case of r = 2, the chromatic number of a random graph must have one of two easily computable values as n tends to infinity. I will describe some joint work with Martin Dyer (Leeds) and Alan Frieze (Carnegie Mellon), in which we generalised this result to random uniform hypergraphs. The argument uses the second moment method, and applies a general theorem for performing Laplace summation over a lattice. So the proof contains something for everyone, with elements from combinatorics, analysis and algebra.
Filtering Theory in Modelling the Electricity Market
12:10 Mon 6 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

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In mathematical finance, as in many other fields where applied mathematics is a powerful tool, we assume that a model is good enough when it captures different sources of randomness affecting the quantity of interests, which in this case is the electricity prices. The power market is very different from other markets in terms of the randomness sources that can be observed in the prices feature and evolution. We start from suggesting a new model that simulates the electricity prices, this new model is constructed by adding a periodicity term, a jumps terms and a positives mean reverting term. The later term is driven by a non-observable Markov process. So in order to prices some financial product, we have to use some of the filtering theory to deal with the non-observable process, these techniques are gaining very much of interest from practitioners and researchers in the field of financial mathematics.
Crystallographic groups I: the classical theory
12:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A discrete isometry group acting properly discontinuously on the n-dimensional Euclidean space with compact quotient is called a crystallographic group. This name reflects the fact that in dimension n=3 their compact fundamental domains resemble a space-filling crystal pattern. For higher dimensions, Hilbert posed his famous 18th problem: "Is there in n-dimensional Euclidean space only a finite number of essentially different kinds of groups of motions with a [compact] fundamental region?" This problem was solved by Bieberbach when he proved that in every dimension n there exists only a finite number of isomorphic crystallographic groups and also gave a description of these groups. From the perspective of differential geometry these results are of major importance, as crystallographic groups are precisely the fundamental groups of compact flat Riemannian orbifolds. The quotient is even a manifold if the fundamental group is required to be torsion-free, in which case it is called a Bieberbach group. Moreover, for a flat manifold the fundamental group completely determines the holonomy group. In this talk I will discuss the properties of crystallographic groups, study examples in dimension n=2 and n=3, and present the three Bieberbach theorems on the structure of crystallographic groups.
K-homology and the quantization commutes with reduction problem
12:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

The quantization commutes with reduction problem for Hamiltonian actions of compact Lie groups was solved by Meinrenken in the mid-1990s using geometric techniques, and solved again shortly afterwards by Tian and Zhang using analytic methods. In this talk I shall outline some of the close links that exist between the problem, the two solutions, and the geometric and analytic versions of K-homology theory that are studied in noncommutative geometry. I shall try to make the case for K-homology as a useful conceptual framework for the solutions and (at least some of) their various generalizations.
Symplectic Lie groups
12:10 Fri 9 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A "symplectic Lie group" is a Lie group G with a symplectic form such that G acts by symplectic transformations on itself. Such a G cannot be semisimple, so the research focuses on solvable symplectic Lie groups. In the compact case, a classification of these groups is known. In many cases, a solvable symplectic Lie group G is a cotangent bundle of a flat Lie group H. Then H is a Lagrange subgroup of G, meaning its Lie algebra h is isotropic in the Lie algebra g of G. The existence of Lagrange subalgebras or ideals in g is an important question which relates to many problems in the general structure theory of symplectic Lie groups. In my talk, I will give a brief overview of the known results in this field, ranging from the 1970s to a very recent structure theory.
A survey of non-abelian cohomology
12:10 Fri 16 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Adelaide

If G is a topological group, not necessarily abelian, then the set H^1(M,G) has a natural interpretation in terms of principal G-bundles on the space M. In this talk I will describe higher degree analogs of both the set H^1(M,G) and the notion of a principal bundle (the latter is closely connected to the subject of bundle gerbes). I will explain, following work of Joyal, Jardine and many others, how the language of abstract homotopy theory gives a very convenient framework for discussing these ideas.
The Einstein equations with torsion, reduction and duality
12:10 Fri 23 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

We consider the Einstein equations for connections with skew torsion. After some general remarks we look at these equations on principal G-bundles, making contact with string structures and heterotic string theory in the process. When G is a torus the equations are shown to possess a symmetry not shared by the usual Einstein equations - T-duality. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati.
Classification Using Censored Functional Data
15:10 Fri 18 Oct, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Aurore Delaigle :: University of Melbourne

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We consider classification of functional data. This problem has received a lot of attention in the literature in the case where the curves are all observed on the same interval. A difficulty in applications is that the functional curves can be supported on quite different intervals, in which case standard methods of analysis cannot be used. We are interested in constructing classifiers for curves of this type. More precisely, we consider classification of functions supported on a compact interval, in cases where the training sample consists of functions observed on other intervals, which may differ among the training curves. We propose several methods, depending on whether or not the observable intervals overlap by a significant amount. In the case where these intervals differ a lot, our procedure involves extending the curves outside the interval where they were observed. We suggest a new nonparametric approach for doing this. We also introduce flexible ways of combining potential differences in shapes of the curves from different populations, and potential differences between the endpoints of the intervals where the curves from each population are observed.
Model Misspecification due to Site Specific Rate Heterogeneity: how is tree inference affected?
12:10 Mon 21 Oct, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Stephen Crotty :: University of Adelaide

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In this talk I'll answer none of the questions you ever had about phylogenetics, but hopefully some you didn't. I'll be giving this presentation at a phylogenetics conference in 3 weeks, so sorry it is a little light on background. You've been warned! Phlyogeneticists have long recognised that different sites in a DNA sequence can experience different rates of nucleotide substitution, and many models have been developed to accommodate this rate heterogeneity. But what happens when a single site exhibits rate heterogeneity along different branches of an evolutionary tree? In this talk I'll introduce the notion of Site Specific Rate Heterogeneity (SSRH) and investigate a simple case, looking at the impact of SSRH on inference via maximum parsimony, neighbour joining and maximum likelihood.
The geometry of rolling surfaces and non-holonomic mechanics
15:10 Fri 1 Nov, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Robert Bryant :: Duke University

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In mechanics, the system of a sphere rolling over a plane without slipping or twisting is a fundamental example of what is called a non-holonomic mechanical system, the study of which belongs to the subject of control theory. The more general case of one surface rolling over another without slipping or twisting is, similarly, of great interest for both practical and theoretical reasons. In this talk, which is intended for a general mathematical audience (i.e., no familiarity with control theory or differential geometry will be assumed), I will describe some of the basic features of this problem, a bit of its history, and some of the surprising developments that its study reveals, such as the unexpected appearance of the exceptional group G_2.
The density property for complex manifolds: a strong form of holomorphic flexibility
12:10 Fri 24 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

Compared with the real differentiable case, complex manifolds in general are more rigid, their groups of holomorphic diffeomorphisms are rather small (in general trivial). A long known exception to this behavior is affine n-space C^n for n at least 2. Its group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is infinite dimensional. In the late 1980s Andersen and Lempert proved a remarkable theorem which stated in its generalized version due to Forstneric and Rosay that any local holomorphic phase flow given on a Runge subset of C^n can be locally uniformly approximated by a global holomorphic diffeomorphism. The main ingredient in the proof was formalized by Varolin and called the density property: The Lie algebra generated by complete holomorphic vector fields is dense in the Lie algebra of all holomorphic vector fields. In these manifolds a similar local to global approximation of Andersen-Lempert type holds. It is a precise way of saying that the group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is large. In the talk we will explain how this notion is related to other more recent flexibility notions in complex geometry, in particular to the notion of a Oka-Forstneric manifold. We will give examples of manifolds with the density property and sketch applications of the density property. If time permits we will explain criteria for the density property developed by Kaliman and the speaker.
Integrability of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras and Lie algebroids
12:10 Fri 7 Feb, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Christoph Wockel :: Hamburg University

Lie's Third Theorem states that each finite-dimensional Lie algebra is the Lie algebra of a Lie group (we also say "integrates to a Lie group"). The corresponding statement for infinite-dimensional Lie algebras or Lie algebroids is false and we will explain geometrically why this is the case. The underlying pattern is that of integration of central extensions of Lie algebras and Lie algebroids. This also occurs in other contexts, and we will explain some aspects of string group models in these terms. In the end we will sketch how the non-integrability of Lie algebras and Lie algebroids can be overcome by passing to higher categorical objects (such as smooth stacks) and give a panoramic (but still conjectural) perspective on the precise relation of the various integrability problems.
Moduli spaces of contact instantons
12:10 Fri 28 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

In dimensions greater than four there are several notions of higher Yang-Mills instantons. This talk concerns one such case, contact instantons, defined for 5-dimensional contact manifolds. The geometry transverse to the Reeb foliation turns out to be important in understanding the moduli space. For example, we show the dimension of the moduli space is the index of a transverse elliptic complex. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati.
T-Duality and its Generalizations
12:10 Fri 11 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Jarah Evslin :: Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS

Given a manifold M with a torus action and a choice of integral 3-cocycle H, T-duality yields another manifold with a torus action and integral 3-cocyle. It induces a number of surprising automorphisms between structures on these manifolds. In this talk I will review T-duality and describe some work on two generalizations which are realized in string theory: NS5-branes and heterotic strings. These respectively correspond to non-closed 3-classes H and to principal bundles fibered over M.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 6 Jun, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Meng Cao and Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

Meng Cao:: Multiscale modelling couples patches of nonlinear wave-like simulations :: Abstract: The multiscale gap-tooth scheme is built from given microscale simulations of complicated physical processes to empower macroscale simulations. By coupling small patches of simulations over unsimulated physical gaps, large savings in computational time are possible. So far the gap-tooth scheme has been developed for dissipative systems, but wave systems are also of great interest. This article develops the gap-tooth scheme to the case of nonlinear microscale simulations of wave-like systems. Classic macroscale interpolation provides a generic coupling between patches that achieves arbitrarily high order consistency between the multiscale scheme and the underlying microscale dynamics. Eigen-analysis indicates that the resultant gap-tooth scheme empowers feasible computation of large scale simulations of wave-like dynamics with complicated underlying physics. As an pilot study, we implement numerical simulations of dam-breaking waves by the gap-tooth scheme. Comparison between a gap-tooth simulation, a microscale simulation over the whole domain, and some published experimental data on dam breaking, demonstrates that the gap-tooth scheme feasibly computes large scale wave-like dynamics with computational savings. Trent Mattner :: Coupled atmosphere-fire simulations of the Canberra 2003 bushfires using WRF-Sfire :: Abstract: The Canberra fires of January 18, 2003 are notorious for the extreme fire behaviour and fire-atmosphere-topography interactions that occurred, including lee-slope fire channelling, pyrocumulonimbus development and tornado formation. In this talk, I will discuss coupled fire-weather simulations of the Canberra fires using WRF-SFire. In these simulations, a fire-behaviour model is used to dynamically predict the evolution of the fire front according to local atmospheric and topographic conditions, as well as the associated heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. It is found that the predicted fire front and heat flux is not too bad, bearing in mind the complexity of the problem and the severe modelling assumptions made. However, the predicted moisture flux is too low, which has some impact on atmospheric dynamics.
Complexifications, Realifications, Real forms and Complex Structures
12:10 Mon 23 Jun, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kelli Francis-Staite :: University of Adelaide

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Italian mathematicians Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia and Gerolamo Cardano introduced complex numbers to solve polynomial equations such as x^2+1=0. Solving a standard real differential equation often uses complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. In both cases, the solution space is expanded to include the complex numbers, solved, and then translated back to the real case. My talk aims to explain the process of complexification and related concepts. It will give vocabulary and some basic results about this important process. And it will contain cute cat pictures.
Modelling the mean-field behaviour of cellular automata
12:10 Mon 4 Aug, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kale Davies :: University of Adelaide

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Cellular automata (CA) are lattice-based models in which agents fill the lattice sites and behave according to some specified rule. CA are particularly useful when modelling cell behaviour and as such many people consider CA model in which agents undergo motility and proliferation type events. We are particularly interested in predicting the average behaviour of these models. In this talk I will show how a system of differential equations can be derived for the system and discuss the difficulties that arise in even the seemingly simple case of a CA with motility and proliferation.
The Dirichlet problem for the prescribed Ricci curvature equation
12:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Artem Pulemotov :: University of Queensland

We will discuss the following question: is it possible to find a Riemannian metric whose Ricci curvature is equal to a given tensor on a manifold M? To answer this question, one must analyze a weakly elliptic second-order geometric PDE. In the first part of the talk, we will review the history of the subject and state several classical theorems. After that, our focus will be on new results concerning the case where M has nonempty boundary.
Quasimodes that do not Equidistribute
13:10 Tue 19 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Shimon Brooks :: Bar-Ilan University

The QUE Conjecture of Rudnick-Sarnak asserts that eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on Riemannian manifolds of negative curvature should equidistribute in the large eigenvalue limit. For a number of reasons, it is expected that this property may be related to the (conjectured) small multiplicities in the spectrum. One way to study this relationship is to ask about equidistribution for "quasimodes"-or approximate eigenfunctions- in place of highly-degenerate eigenspaces. We will discuss the case of surfaces of constant negative curvature; in particular, we will explain how to construct some examples of sufficiently weak quasimodes that do not satisfy QUE, and show how they fit into the larger theory.
T-duality and the chiral de Rham complex
12:10 Fri 22 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Andrew Linshaw :: University of Denver

The chiral de Rham complex of Malikov, Schechtman, and Vaintrob is a sheaf of vertex algebras that exists on any smooth manifold M. It has a square-zero differential D, and contains the algebra of differential forms on M as a subcomplex. In this talk, I'll give an introduction to vertex algebras and sketch this construction. Finally, I'll discuss a notion of T-duality in this setting. This is based on joint work in progress with V. Mathai.
Spherical T-duality
01:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

I will talk on a new variant of T-duality, called spherical T-duality, which relates pairs of the form (P,H) consisting of a principal SU(2)-bundle P --> M and a 7-cocycle H on P. Intuitively spherical T-duality exchanges H with the second Chern class c_2(P). This is precisely true when M is compact oriented and dim(M) is at most 4. When M is higher dimensional, not all pairs (P,H) admit spherical T-duals and even when they exist, the spherical T-duals are not always unique. We will try and explain this phenomenon. Nonetheless, we prove that all spherical T-dualities induce a degree-shifting isomorphism on the 7-twisted cohomologies of the bundles and, when dim(M) is at most 7, also their integral twisted cohomologies and, when dim(M) is at most 4, even their 7-twisted K-theories. While the complete physical relevance of spherical T-duality is still being explored, it does provide an identification between conserved charges in certain distinct IIB supergravity and string compactifications. This is joint work with Peter Bouwknegt and Jarah Evslin.
Modelling segregation distortion in multi-parent crosses
15:00 Mon 17 Nov, 2014 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Rohan Shah (joint work with B. Emma Huang and Colin R. Cavanagh) :: The University of Queensland

Construction of high-density genetic maps has been made feasible by low-cost high-throughput genotyping technology; however, the process is still complicated by biological, statistical and computational issues. A major challenge is the presence of segregation distortion, which can be caused by selection, difference in fitness, or suppression of recombination due to introgressed segments from other species. Alien introgressions are common in major crop species, where they have often been used to introduce beneficial genes from wild relatives. Segregation distortion causes problems at many stages of the map construction process, including assignment to linkage groups and estimation of recombination fractions. This can result in incorrect ordering and estimation of map distances. While discarding markers will improve the resulting map, it may result in the loss of genomic regions under selection or containing beneficial genes (in the case of introgression). To correct for segregation distortion we model it explicitly in the estimation of recombination fractions. Previously proposed methods introduce additional parameters to model the distortion, with a corresponding increase in computing requirements. This poses difficulties for large, densely genotyped experimental populations. We propose a method imposing minimal additional computational burden which is suitable for high-density map construction in large multi-parent crosses. We demonstrate its use modelling the known Sr36 introgression in wheat for an eight-parent complex cross.
Tannaka duality for stacks
12:10 Fri 6 Mar, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Jack Hall :: Australian National University

Traditionally, Tannaka duality is used to reconstruct a group from its representations. I will describe a reformulation of this duality for stacks, which is due to Lurie, and briefly touch on some applications.
Singular Pfaffian systems in dimension 6
12:10 Fri 20 Mar, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Pawel Nurowski :: Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences

We consider a pair of rank 3 distributions in dimension 6 with some remarkable properties. They define an analog of the celebrated nearly-Kahler structure on the 6 sphere, with the exceptional simple Lie group G2 as a group of symmetries. In our case the metric associated with the structure is pseudo-Riemannian, of split signature. The 6 manifold has a 5-dimensional boundary with interesting induced geometry. This structure on the boundary has no analog in the Riemannian case.
Higher homogeneous bundles
12:10 Fri 27 Mar, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

Historically, homogeneous bundles were among the first examples of principal bundles. This talk will cover a general method that gives rise to many homogeneous principal 2-bundles.
Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case
12:10 Fri 1 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Spherical T-duality is related to M-theory and was introduced in recent joint work with Bouwknegt and Evslin. I will begin by briefly reviewing the case of principal SU(2)-bundles with degree 7 flux, and then focus on the non-principal case for most of the talk, ending with the relation to SUGRA/M-theory.
Indefinite spectral triples and foliations of spacetime
12:10 Fri 8 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Koen van den Dungen :: Australian National University

Motivated by Dirac operators on Lorentzian manifolds, we propose a new framework to deal with non-symmetric and non-elliptic operators in noncommutative geometry. We provide a definition for indefinite spectral triples, which correspond bijectively with certain pairs of spectral triples. Next, we will show how a special case of indefinite spectral triples can be constructed from a family of spectral triples. In particular, this construction provides a convenient setting to study the Dirac operator on a spacetime with a foliation by spacelike hypersurfaces. This talk is based on joint work with Adam Rennie (arXiv:1503.06916).
An Engineer-Mathematician Duality Approach to Finite Element Methods
12:10 Mon 18 May, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Jordan Belperio :: University of Adelaide

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The finite element method has been a prominently used numerical technique for engineers solving solid mechanics, electro-magnetic and heat transfer problems for over 30 years. More recently the finite element method has been used to solve fluid mechanics problems, a field where finite difference methods are more commonly used. In this talk, I will introduce the basic mathematics behind the finite element method, the similarity between the finite element method and finite difference method and comparing how engineers and mathematicians use finite element methods. I will then demonstrate two solutions to the wave equation using the finite element method.
Quantising proper actions on Spin-c manifolds
11:00 Fri 31 Jul, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli Level 7 Room 7.15 :: Peter Hochs :: The University of Adelaide

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For a proper action by a Lie group on a Spin-c manifold (both of which may be noncompact), we study an index of deformations of the Spin-c Dirac operator, acting on the space of spinors invariant under the group action. When applied to spinors that are square integrable transversally to orbits in a suitable sense, the kernel of this operator turns out to be finite-dimensional, under certain hypotheses of the deformation. This also allows one to show that the index has the quantisation commutes with reduction property (as proved by Meinrenken in the compact symplectic case, and by Paradan-Vergne in the compact Spin-c case), for sufficiently large powers of the determinant line bundle. Furthermore, this result extends to Spin-c Dirac operators twisted by vector bundles. A key ingredient of the arguments is the use of a family of inner products on the Lie algebra, depending on a point in the manifold. This is joint work with Mathai Varghese.
T-duality and bulk-boundary correspondence
12:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: The University of Adelaide

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Bulk-boundary correspondences in physics can be modelled as topological boundary homomorphisms in K-theory, associated to an extension of a "bulk algebra" by a "boundary algebra". In joint work with V. Mathai, such bulk-boundary maps are shown to T-dualize into simple restriction maps in a large number of cases, generalizing what the Fourier transform does for ordinary functions. I will give examples, involving both complex and real K-theory, and explain how these results may be used to study topological phases of matter and D-brane charges in string theory.
T-dual noncommutative principal torus bundles
12:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2015 :: Engineering Maths Building EMG07 :: Keith Hannabuss :: University of Oxford

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Since the work of Mathai and Rosenberg it is known that the T-dual of a principal torus bundle can be described as a noncommutative torus bundle. This talk will look at a simple example of two T-dual bundles both of which are noncommutative. Then it will discuss a strategy for extending this to more general noncommutative bundles.
Analytic complexity of bivariate holomorphic functions and cluster trees
12:10 Fri 2 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Timur Sadykov :: Plekhanov University, Moscow

The Kolmogorov-Arnold theorem yields a representation of a multivariate continuous function in terms of a composition of functions which depend on at most two variables. In the analytic case, understanding the complexity of such a representation naturally leads to the notion of the analytic complexity of (a germ of) a bivariate multi-valued analytic function. According to Beloshapka's local definition, the order of complexity of any univariate function is equal to zero while the n-th complexity class is defined recursively to consist of functions of the form a(b(x,y)+c(x,y)), where a is a univariate analytic function and b and c belong to the (n-1)-th complexity class. Such a represenation is meant to be valid for suitable germs of multi-valued holomorphic functions. A randomly chosen bivariate analytic functions will most likely have infinite analytic complexity. However, for a number of important families of special functions of mathematical physics their complexity is finite and can be computed or estimated. Using this, we introduce the notion of the analytic complexity of a binary tree, in particular, a cluster tree, and investigate its properties.
Oka principles and the linearization problem
12:10 Fri 8 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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Let G be a reductive complex Lie group (e.g., SL(n,C)) and let X and Y be Stein manifolds (closed complex submanifolds of some C^n). Suppose that G acts freely on X and Y. Then there are quotient Stein manifolds X/G and Y/G and quotient mappings p_X:X-> X/G and p_Y: Y-> Y/G such that X and Y are principal G-bundles over X/G and Y/G. Let us suppose that Q=X/G ~= Y/G so that X and Y have the same quotient Q. A map Phi: X\to Y of principal bundles (over Q) is simply an equivariant continuous map commuting with the projections. That is, Phi(gx)=g Phi(x) for all g in G and x in X, and p_X=p_Y o Phi. The famous Oka Principle of Grauert says that any Phi as above embeds in a continuous family Phi_t: X -> Y, t in [0,1], where Phi_0=Phi, all the Phi_t satisfy the same conditions as Phi does and Phi_1 is holomorphic. This is rather amazing. We consider the case where G does not necessarily act freely on X and Y. There is still a notion of quotient and quotient mappings p_X: X-> X//G and p_Y: Y-> Y//G where X//G and Y//G are now Stein spaces and parameterize the closed G-orbits in X and Y. We assume that Q~= X//G~= Y//G and that we have a continuous equivariant Phi such that p_X=p_Y o Phi. We find conditions under which Phi embeds into a continuous family Phi_t such that Phi_1 is holomorphic. We give an application to the Linearization Problem. Let G act holomorphically on C^n. When is there a biholomorphic map Phi:C^n -> C^n such that Phi^{-1} o g o Phi in GL(n,C) for all g in G? We find a condition which is necessary and sufficient for "most" G-actions. This is joint work with F. Kutzschebauch and F. Larusson.
T-duality for elliptic curve orientifolds
12:10 Fri 4 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Jonathan Rosenberg :: University of Maryland

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Orientifold string theories are quantum field theories based on the geometry of a space with an involution. T-dualities are certain relationships between such theories that look different on the surface but give rise to the same observable physics. In this talk I will not assume any knowledge of physics but will concentrate on the associated geometry, in the case where the underlying space is a (complex) elliptic curve and the involution is either holomorphic or anti-holomorphic. The results blend algebraic topology and algebraic geometry. This is mostly joint work with Chuck Doran and Stefan Mendez-Diez.
Harmonic analysis of Hodge-Dirac operators
12:10 Fri 13 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Pierre Portal :: Australian National University

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When the metric on a Riemannian manifold is perturbed in a rough (merely bounded and measurable) manner, do basic estimates involving the Hodge Dirac operator $D = d+d^*$ remain valid? Even in the model case of a perturbation of the euclidean metric on $\mathbb{R}^n$, this is a difficult question. For instance, the fact that the $L^2$ estimate $\|Du\|_2 \sim \|\sqrt{D^{2}}u\|_2$ remains valid for perturbed versions of $D$ was a famous conjecture made by Kato in 1961 and solved, positively, in a ground breaking paper of Auscher, Hofmann, Lacey, McIntosh and Tchamitchian in 2002. In the past fifteen years, a theory has emerged from the solution of this conjecture, making rough perturbation problems much more tractable. In this talk, I will give a general introduction to this theory, and present one of its latest results: a flexible approach to $L^p$ estimates for the holomorphic functional calculus of $D$. This is joint work with D. Frey (Delft) and A. McIntosh (ANU).
Smooth mapping orbifolds
12:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

It is well-known that orbifolds can be represented by a special kind of Lie groupoid, namely those that are étale and proper. Lie groupoids themselves are one way of presenting certain nice differentiable stacks. In joint work with Ray Vozzo we have constructed a presentation of the mapping stack Hom(disc(M),X), for M a compact manifold and X a differentiable stack, by a Fréchet-Lie groupoid. This uses an apparently new result in global analysis about the map C^\infty(K_1,Y) \to C^\infty(K_2,Y) induced by restriction along the inclusion K_2 \to K_1, for certain compact K_1,K_2. We apply this to the case of X being an orbifold to show that the mapping stack is an infinite-dimensional orbifold groupoid. We also present results about mapping groupoids for bundle gerbes.
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
Some free boundary value problems in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows
12:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Valentina Wheeler :: University of Wollongong

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In this talk we present an overview of the current research in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows with free boundaries, with particular focus on our own results. Firstly we consider the scenario of a mean curvature flow solution with a ninety-degree angle condition on a fixed hypersurface in Euclidean space, that we call the contact hypersurface. We prove that under restrictions on either the initial hypersurface (such as rotational symmetry) or restrictions on the contact hypersurface the flow exists for all times and converges to a self-similar solution. We also discuss the possibility of a curvature singularity appearing on the free boundary contained in the contact hypersurface. We extend some of these results to the setting of a hypersurface evolving in its normal direction with speed given by a fully nonlinear functional of the principal curvatures.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Algebraic structures associated to Brownian motion on Lie groups
13:10 Thu 16 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Steve Rosenberg :: University of Adelaide / Boston University

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In (1+1)-d TQFT, products and coproducts are associated to pairs of pants decompositions of Riemann surfaces. We consider a toy model in dimension (0+1) consisting of specific broken paths in a Lie group. The products and coproducts are constructed by a Brownian motion average of holonomy along these paths with respect to a connection on an auxiliary bundle. In the trivial case over the torus, we (seem to) recover the Hopf algebra structure on the symmetric algebra. In the general case, we (seem to) get deformations of this Hopf algebra. This is a preliminary report on joint work with Michael Murray and Raymond Vozzo.
Chern-Simons invariants of Seifert manifolds via Loop spaces
14:10 Tue 28 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Ryan Mickler :: Northeastern University

Over the past 30 years the Chern-Simons functional for connections on G-bundles over three-manfolds has lead to a deep understanding of the geometry of three-manfiolds, as well as knot invariants such as the Jones polynomial. Here we study this functional for three-manfolds that are topologically given as the total space of a principal circle bundle over a compact Riemann surface base, which are known as Seifert manifolds. We show that on such manifolds the Chern-Simons functional reduces to a particular gauge-theoretic functional on the 2d base, that describes a gauge theory of connections on an infinite dimensional bundle over this base with structure group given by the level-k affine central extension of the loop group LG. We show that this formulation gives a new understanding of results of Beasley-Witten on the computability of quantum Chern-Simons invariants of these manifolds as well as knot invariants for knots that wrap a single fiber of the circle bundle. A central tool in our analysis is the Caloron correspondence of Murray-Stevenson-Vozzo.
What is the best way to count votes?
13:10 Mon 12 Sep, 2016 :: Hughes 322 :: Dr Stuart Johnson :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Around the world there are many different ways of counting votes in elections, and even within Australia there are different methods in use in various states. Which is the best method? Even for the simplest case of electing one person in a single electorate there is no easy answer to this, in fact there is a famous result - Arrow's Theorem - which tells us that there is no perfect way of counting votes. I will describe a number of different methods along with their problems before giving a more precise statement of the theorem and outlining a proof
SIR epidemics with stages of infection
12:10 Wed 28 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Matthieu Simon :: Universite Libre de Bruxelles

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This talk is concerned with a stochastic model for the spread of an epidemic in a closed homogeneously mixing population. The population is subdivided into three classes of individuals: the susceptibles, the infectives and the removed cases. In short, an infective remains infectious during a random period of time. While infected, it can contact all the susceptibles present, independently of the other infectives. At the end of the infectious period, it becomes a removed case and has no further part in the infection process.

We represent an infectious period as a set of different stages that an infective can go through before being removed. The transitions between stages are ruled by either a Markov process or a semi-Markov process. In each stage, an infective makes contaminations at the epochs of a Poisson process with a specific rate.

Our purpose is to derive closed expressions for a transform of different statistics related to the end of the epidemic, such as the final number of susceptibles and the area under the trajectories of all the infectives. The analysis is performed by using simple matrix analytic methods and martingale arguments. Numerical illustrations will be provided at the end of the talk.
Transmission Dynamics of Visceral Leishmaniasis: designing a test and treat control strategy
12:10 Thu 29 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Graham Medley :: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is targeted for elimination from the Indian Sub-Continent. Progress has been much better in some areas than others. Current control is based on earlier diagnosis and treatment and on insecticide spraying to reduce the density of the vector. There is a surprising dearth of specific information on the epidemiology of VL, which makes modelling more difficult. In this seminar, I describe a simple framework that gives some insight into the transmission dynamics. We conclude that the majority of infection comes from cases prior to diagnosis. If this is the case then, early diagnosis will be advantageous, but will require a test with high specificity. This is a paradox for many clinicians and public health workers, who tend to prioritise high sensitivity.

Medley, G.F., Hollingsworth, T.D., Olliaro, P.L. & Adams, E.R. (2015) Health-seeking, diagnostics and transmission in the control of visceral leishmaniasis. Nature 528, S102-S108 (3 December 2015), DOI: 10.1038/nature16042
Symmetric functions and quantum integrability
15:10 Fri 30 Sep, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Dr Paul Zinn-Justin :: University of Melbourne/Universite Pierre et Marie Curie

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We'll discuss an approach to studying families of symmetric polynomials which is based on ''quantum integrability'', that is, on the use of exactly solvable two-dimensional lattice models. We'll first explain the general strategy on the simplest case, namely Schur polynomials, with the introduction of a model of lattice paths (a.k.a. five-vertex model). We'll then discuss recent work (in collaboration with M. Wheeler) that extends this approach to Hall--Littlewood polynomials and Grothendieck polynomials, and some applications of it.
Measuring and mapping carbon dioxide from remote sensing satellite data
15:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Noel Cressie :: University of Wollongong

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This talk is about environmental statistics for global remote sensing of atmospheric carbon dioxide, a leading greenhouse gas. An important compartment of the carbon cycle is atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), where it (and other gases) contribute to climate change through a greenhouse effect. There are a number of CO2 observational programs where measurements are made around the globe at a small number of ground-based locations at somewhat regular time intervals. In contrast, satellite-based programs are spatially global but give up some of the temporal richness. The most recent satellite launched to measure CO2 was NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), whose principal objective is to retrieve a geographical distribution of CO2 sources and sinks. OCO-2's measurement of column-averaged mole fraction, XCO2, is designed to achieve this, through a data-assimilation procedure that is statistical at its basis. Consequently, uncertainty quantification is key, starting with the spectral radiances from an individual sounding to borrowing of strength through spatial-statistical modelling.
Toroidal Soap Bubbles: Constant Mean Curvature Tori in S ^ 3 and R ^3
12:10 Fri 28 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Emma Carberry :: University of Sydney

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Constant mean curvature (CMC) tori in S ^ 3, R ^ 3 or H ^ 3 are in bijective correspondence with spectral curve data, consisting of a hyperelliptic curve, a line bundle on this curve and some additional data, which in particular determines the relevant space form. This point of view is particularly relevant for considering moduli-space questions, such as the prevalence of tori amongst CMC planes and whether tori can be deformed. I will address these questions for the spherical and Euclidean cases, using Whitham deformations.
Geometric structures on moduli spaces
12:10 Fri 31 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

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Moduli spaces are used to classify various kinds of objects, often arising from solutions of certain differential equations on manifolds; for example, the complex structures on a compact surface or the anti-self-dual Yang-Mills equations on an oriented smooth 4-manifold. Sometimes these moduli spaces carry important information about the underlying manifold, manifested most clearly in the results of Donaldson and others on the topology of smooth 4-manifolds. It is also the case that these moduli spaces themselves carry interesting geometric structures; for example, the Weil-Petersson metric on moduli spaces of compact Riemann surfaces, exploited to great effect by Maryam Mirzakhani. In this talk, I shall elaborate on the theme of geometric structures on moduli spaces, with particular focus on some recent-ish work done in conjunction with Georg Schumacher.
One-layer liquid films loaded with self-propelled particles and two-layer films under vibration
15:10 Fri 31 Mar, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Dr Andriy Pototskyy :: Swinburne University of Technology

In the first part, we consider a colony of self-propelled particles (swimmers) in a thin liquid film resting on a solid plate with deformable liquid-gas interface. The local surface tension of the liquid-gas interface is altered by the local density of swimmers due to the soluto-Marangoni effect. Linear stability of the flat film and nonlinear time evolution is analyzed in case of the swarming interaction between the swimmers. In the second part, we study the Faraday instability and nonlinear patterns in vibrated two-layer liquid films. For gravitationally stable two-layer films with a lighter fluid on top of the heavier fluid, we find squares, hexagons, quasiperiodic patterns with eightfold symmetry as well as localized states in the form of large scale depletion regions or finite depth holes, occurring at the interface and surface. For a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable combination (heavier fluid above the light one) we show that external vibration increases the lifetime of the film by delaying or completely suppressing the film rupture.
Poisson-Lie T-duality and integrability
11:10 Thu 13 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering & Math EM213 :: Ctirad Klimcik :: Aix-Marseille University, Marseille

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The Poisson-Lie T-duality relates sigma-models with target spaces symmetric with respect to mutually dual Poisson-Lie groups. In the special case if the Poisson-Lie symmetry reduces to the standard non-Abelian symmetry one of the corresponding mutually dual sigma-models is the standard principal chiral model which is known to enjoy the property of integrability. A natural question whether this non-Abelian integrability can be lifted to integrability of sigma model dualizable with respect to the general Poisson-Lie symmetry has been answered in the affirmative by myself in 2008. The corresponding Poisson-Lie symmetric and integrable model is a one-parameter deformation of the principal chiral model and features a remarkable explicit appearance of the standard Yang-Baxter operator in the target space geometry. Several distinct integrable deformations of the Yang-Baxter sigma model have been then subsequently uncovered which turn out to be related by the Poisson-Lie T-duality to the so called lambda-deformed sigma models. My talk gives a review of these developments some of which found applications in string theory in the framework of the AdS/CFT correspondence.
Hodge theory on the moduli space of Riemann surfaces
12:10 Fri 5 May, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Jesse Gell-Redman :: University of Melbourne

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The Hodge theorem on a closed Riemannian manifold identifies the deRham cohomology with the space of harmonic differential forms. Although there are various extensions of the Hodge theorem to singular or complete but non-compact spaces, when there is an identification of L^2 Harmonic forms with a topological feature of the underlying space, it is highly dependent on the nature of infinity (in the non-compact case) or the locus of incompleteness; no unifying theorem treats all cases. We will discuss work toward extending the Hodge theorem to singular Riemannian manifolds where the singular locus is an incomplete cusp edge. These can be pictured locally as a bundle of horns, and they provide a model for the behavior of the Weil-Petersson metric on the compactified Riemann moduli space near the interior of a divisor. Joint with J. Swoboda and R. Melrose.
Plumbing regular closed polygonal curves
12:10 Mon 22 May, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Dr Barry Cox :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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In 1980 the following puzzle appeared in Mathematics Magazine: A certain mathematician, in order to make ends meet, moonlights as an apprentice plumber. One night, as the mathematician contemplated a pile of straight pipes of equal lengths and right-angled elbows, the following question occurred to this mathematician: ``For which positive integers n could I form a closed polygonal curve using n such straight pipes and n elbows?'' It turns out that it is possible for any even number n greater than or equal to 4 and any odd number n greater than or equal to 7. However the case n=7 is particularly interesting because it can be done one of two ways and the problem is related to that of determining all the possible conformations of the molecule cyclo-heptane, although the angles in cyclo-heptane are not right angles. This raises the questions: ``Do the two solutions to the maths puzzle with right-angles correspond to the two principal conformations of cyclo-heptane?'', and ``How many solutions/conformations exist for other elbow angles?'' These and other issues will be discussed.
Probabilistic approaches to human cognition: What can the math tell us?
15:10 Fri 26 May, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Dr Amy Perfors :: School of Psychology, University of Adelaide

Why do people avoid vaccinating their children? Why, in groups, does it seem like the most extreme positions are weighted more highly? On the surface, both of these examples look like instances of non-optimal or irrational human behaviour. This talk presents preliminary evidence suggesting, however, that in both cases this pattern of behaviour is sensible given certain assumptions about the structure of the world and the nature of beliefs. In the case of vaccination, we model people's choices using expected utility theory. This reveals that their ignorance about the nature of diseases like whooping cough makes them underweight the negative utility attached to contracting such a disease. When that ignorance is addressed, their values and utilities shift. In the case of extreme positions, we use simulations of chains of Bayesian learners to demonstrate that whenever information is propagated in groups, the views of the most extreme learners naturally gain more traction. This effect emerges as the result of basic mathematical assumptions rather than human irrationality.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 18 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

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A pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous space $M$ of finite volume can be presented as $M=G/H$, where $G$ is a Lie group acting transitively and isometrically on $M$, and $H$ is a closed subgroup of $G$. The condition that $G$ acts isometrically and thus preserves a finite measure on $M$ leads to strong algebraic restrictions on $G$. In the special case where $G$ has no compact semisimple normal subgroups, it turns out that the isotropy subgroup $H$ is a lattice, and that the metric on $M$ comes from a bi-invariant metric on $G$. This result allows us to recover Zeghib’s classification of Lorentzian compact homogeneous spaces, and to move towards a classification for metric index 2. As an application we can investigate which pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces of finite volume are Einstein spaces. Through the existence questions for lattice subgroups, this leads to an interesting connection with the theory of transcendental numbers, which allows us to characterize the Einstein cases in low dimensions. This talk is based on joint works with Oliver Baues, Yuri Nikolayevsky and Abdelghani Zeghib.
Time-reversal symmetric topology from physics
12:10 Fri 25 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: University of Adelaide

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Time-reversal plays a crucial role in experimentally discovered topological insulators (2008) and semimetals (2015). This is mathematically interesting because one is forced to use "Quaternionic" characteristic classes and differential topology --- a previously ill-motivated generalisation. Guided by physical intuition, an equivariant Poincare-Lefschetz duality, Euler structures, and a new type of monopole with torsion charge, will be introduced.
Dynamics of transcendental Hanon maps
11:10 Wed 20 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering & Math EM212 :: Leandro Arosio :: University of Rome

The dynamics of a polynomial in the complex plane is a classical topic studied already at the beginning of the 20th century by Fatou and Julia. The complex plane is partitioned in two natural invariant sets: a compact set called the Julia set, with (usually) fractal structure and chaotic behaviour, and the Fatou set, where dynamics has no sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The dynamics of a transcendental map was first studied by Baker fifty years ago, and shows striking differences with the polynomial case: for example, there are wandering Fatou components. Moving to C^2, an analogue of polynomial dynamics is given by Hanon maps, polynomial automorphisms with interesting dynamics. In this talk I will introduce a natural generalisation of transcendental dynamics to C^2, and show how to construct wandering domains for such maps.
End-periodic K-homology and spin bordism
12:10 Fri 20 Oct, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Michael Hallam :: University of Adelaide

This talk introduces new "end-periodic" variants of geometric K-homology and spin bordism theories that are tailored to a recent index theorem for even-dimensional manifolds with periodic ends. This index theorem, due to Mrowka, Ruberman and Saveliev, is a generalisation of the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem for manifolds with odd-dimensional boundary. As in the APS index theorem, there is an (end-periodic) eta invariant that appears as a correction term for the periodic end. Invariance properties of the standard relative eta invariants are elegantly expressed using K-homology and spin bordism, and this continues to hold in the end-periodic case. In fact, there are natural isomorphisms between the standard K-homology/bordism theories and their end-periodic versions, and moreover these isomorphisms preserve relative eta invariants. The study is motivated by results on positive scalar curvature, namely obstructions and distinct path components of the moduli space of PSC metrics. Our isomorphisms provide a systematic method for transferring certain results on PSC from the odd-dimensional case to the even-dimensional case. This work is joint with Mathai Varghese.
Springer correspondence for symmetric spaces
12:10 Fri 17 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Ting Xue :: University of Melbourne

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The Springer theory for reductive algebraic groups plays an important role in representation theory. It relates nilpotent orbits in the Lie algebra to irreducible representations of the Weyl group. We develop a Springer theory in the case of symmetric spaces using Fourier transform, which relates nilpotent orbits in this setting to irreducible representations of Hecke algebras of various Coxeter groups with specified parameters. This in turn gives rise to character sheaves on symmetric spaces, which we describe explicitly in the case of classical symmetric spaces. A key ingredient in the construction is the nearby cycle sheaves associated to the adjoint quotient map. The talk is based on joint work with Kari Vilonen and partly based on joint work with Misha Grinberg and Kari Vilonen.
Stochastic Modelling of Urban Structure
11:10 Mon 20 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N132 :: Mark Girolami :: Imperial College London, and The Alan Turing Institute

Media...
Urban systems are complex in nature and comprise of a large number of individuals that act according to utility, a measure of net benefit pertaining to preferences. The actions of individuals give rise to an emergent behaviour, creating the so-called urban structure that we observe. In this talk, I develop a stochastic model of urban structure to formally account for uncertainty arising from the complex behaviour. We further use this stochastic model to infer the components of a utility function from observed urban structure. This is a more powerful modelling framework in comparison to the ubiquitous discrete choice models that are of limited use for complex systems, in which the overall preferences of individuals are difficult to ascertain. We model urban structure as a realization of a Boltzmann distribution that is the invariant distribution of a related stochastic differential equation (SDE) that describes the dynamics of the urban system. Our specification of Boltzmann distribution assigns higher probability to stable configurations, in the sense that consumer surplus (demand) is balanced with running costs (supply), as characterized by a potential function. We specify a Bayesian hierarchical model to infer the components of a utility function from observed structure. Our model is doubly-intractable and poses significant computational challenges that we overcome using recent advances in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. We demonstrate our methodology with case studies on the London retail system and airports in England.
A multiscale approximation of a Cahn-Larche system with phase separation on the microscale
15:10 Thu 22 Feb, 2018 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Ms Lisa Reischmann :: University of Augsberg

We consider the process of phase separation of a binary system under the influence of mechanical deformation and we derive a mathematical multiscale model, which describes the evolving microstructure taking into account the elastic properties of the involved materials. Motivated by phase-separation processes observed in lipid monolayers in film-balance experiments, the starting point of the model is the Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled with the equations of linear elasticity, the so-called Cahn-Larche system. Owing to the fact that the mechanical deformation takes place on a macrosopic scale whereas the phase separation happens on a microscopic level, a multiscale approach is imperative. We assume the pattern of the evolving microstructure to have an intrinsic length scale associated with it, which, after nondimensionalisation, leads to a scaled model involving a small parameter epsilon>0, which is suitable for periodic-homogenisation techniques. For the full nonlinear problem the so-called homogenised problem is then obtained by letting epsilon tend to zero using the method of asymptotic expansion. Furthermore, we present a linearised Cahn-Larche system and use the method of two-scale convergence to obtain the associated limit problem, which turns out to have the same structure as in the nonlinear case, in a mathematically rigorous way. Properties of the limit model will be discussed.
A Hecke module structure on the KK-theory of arithmetic groups
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Bram Mesland :: University of Bonn

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Let $G$ be a locally compact group, $\Gamma$ a discrete subgroup and $C_{G}(\Gamma)$ the commensurator of $\Gamma$ in $G$. The cohomology of $\Gamma$ is a module over the Shimura Hecke ring of the pair $(\Gamma,C_G(\Gamma))$. This construction recovers the action of the Hecke operators on modular forms for $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$ as a particular case. In this talk I will discuss how the Shimura Hecke ring of a pair $(\Gamma, C_{G}(\Gamma))$ maps into the $KK$-ring associated to an arbitrary $\Gamma$-C*-algebra. From this we obtain a variety of $K$-theoretic Hecke modules. In the case of manifolds the Chern character provides a Hecke equivariant transformation into cohomology, which is an isomorphism in low dimensions. We discuss Hecke equivariant exact sequences arising from possibly noncommutative compactifications of $\Gamma$-spaces. Examples include the Borel-Serre and geodesic compactifications of the universal cover of an arithmetic manifold, and the totally disconnected boundary of the Bruhat-Tits tree of $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$. This is joint work with M.H. Sengun (Sheffield).
Radial Toeplitz operators on bounded symmetric domains
11:10 Fri 9 Mar, 2018 :: Lower Napier LG11 :: Raul Quiroga-Barranco :: CIMAT, Guanajuato, Mexico

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The Bergman spaces on a complex domain are defined as the space of holomorphic square-integrable functions on the domain. These carry interesting structures both for analysis and representation theory in the case of bounded symmetric domains. On the other hand, these spaces have some bounded operators obtained as the composition of a multiplier operator and a projection. These operators are highly noncommuting between each other. However, there exist large commutative C*-algebras generated by some of these Toeplitz operators very much related to Lie groups. I will construct an example of such C*-algebras and provide a fairly explicit simultaneous diagonalization of the generating Toeplitz operators.
Chaos in higher-dimensional complex dynamics
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

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I will report on new joint work with Leandro Arosio (University of Rome, Tor Vergata). Complex manifolds can be thought of as laid out across a spectrum characterised by rigidity at one end and flexibility at the other. On the rigid side, Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifolds have at most a finite-dimensional group of symmetries. On the flexible side, there are manifolds with an extremely large group of holomorphic automorphisms, the prototypes being the affine spaces $\mathbb C^n$ for $n \geq 2$. From a dynamical point of view, hyperbolicity does not permit chaos. An endomorphism of a Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifold is non-expansive with respect to the Kobayashi distance, so every family of endomorphisms is equicontinuous. We show that not only does flexibility allow chaos: under a strong anti-hyperbolicity assumption, chaotic automorphisms are generic. A special case of our main result is that if $G$ is a connected complex linear algebraic group of dimension at least 2, not semisimple, then chaotic automorphisms are generic among all holomorphic automorphisms of $G$ that preserve a left- or right-invariant Haar form. For $G=\mathbb C^n$, this result was proved (although not explicitly stated) some 20 years ago by Fornaess and Sibony. Our generalisation follows their approach. I will give plenty of context and background, as well as some details of the proof of the main result.
The mass of Riemannian manifolds
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Matthias Ludewig :: MPIM Bonn

We will define the mass of differential operators L on compact Riemannian manifolds. In odd dimensions, if L is a conformally covariant differential operator, then its mass is also conformally covariant, while in even dimensions, one has a more complicated transformation rule. In the special case that L is the Yamabe operator, its mass is related to the ADM mass of an associated asymptotically flat spacetime. In particular, one expects positive mass theorems in various settings. Here we highlight some recent results.
Hitchin's Projectively Flat Connection for the Moduli Space of Higgs Bundles
13:10 Fri 15 Jun, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: John McCarthy :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I will discuss the problem of geometrically quantizing the moduli space of Higgs bundles on a compact Riemann surface using Kahler polarisations. I will begin by introducing geometric quantization via Kahler polarisations for compact manifolds, leading up to the definition of a Hitchin connection as stated by Andersen. I will then describe the moduli spaces of stable bundles and Higgs bundles over a compact Riemann surface, and discuss their properties. The problem of geometrically quantizing the moduli space of stables bundles, a compact space, was solved independently by Hitchin and Axelrod, Del PIetra, and Witten. The Higgs moduli space is non-compact and therefore the techniques used do not apply, but carries an action of C*. I will finish the talk by discussing the problem of finding a Hitchin connection that preserves this C* action. Such a connection exists in the case of Higgs line bundles, and I will comment on the difficulties in higher rank.
Tales of Multiple Regression: Informative Missingness, Recommender Systems, and R2-D2
15:10 Fri 17 Aug, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: Prof Howard Bondell :: University of Melbourne

In this talk, we briefly discuss two projects tangentially related under the umbrella of high-dimensional regression. The first part of the talk investigates informative missingness in the framework of recommender systems. In this setting, we envision a potential rating for every object-user pair. The goal of a recommender system is to predict the unobserved ratings in order to recommend an object that the user is likely to rate highly. A typically overlooked piece is that the combinations are not missing at random. For example, in movie ratings, a relationship between the user ratings and their viewing history is expected, as human nature dictates the user would seek out movies that they anticipate enjoying. We model this informative missingness, and place the recommender system in a shared-variable regression framework which can aid in prediction quality. The second part of the talk deals with a new class of prior distributions for shrinkage regularization in sparse linear regression, particularly the high dimensional case. Instead of placing a prior on the coefficients themselves, we place a prior on the regression R-squared. This is then distributed to the coefficients by decomposing it via a Dirichlet Distribution. We call the new prior R2-D2 in light of its R-Squared Dirichlet Decomposition. Compared to existing shrinkage priors, we show that the R2-D2 prior can simultaneously achieve both high prior concentration at zero, as well as heavier tails. These two properties combine to provide a higher degree of shrinkage on the irrelevant coefficients, along with less bias in estimation of the larger signals.
Discrete fluxes and duality in gauge theory
11:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Siye Wu :: National Tsinghua University

We explore the notions of discrete electric and magnetic fluxes introduced by 't Hooft in the late 1970s. After explaining their physics origin, we consider the description in mathematical terminology. We finally study their role in duality.
Noncommutative principal G-bundles
11:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Keith Hannabuss :: University of Oxford

Noncommutative geometry provides greater flexibility for studying some problems. This seminar will survey some work on noncommutative principal G-bundles. These were classified for abelian groups some years ago, but nonabelian groups require a different approach, using tools developed for a totally different reason in the 1980s. This uncovers links with ergodic theory, quantum groups and the Yang-Baxter equation.
Some advances in the formulation of analytical methods for linear and nonlinear dynamics
15:10 Tue 20 Nov, 2018 :: EMG07 :: Dr Vladislav Sorokin :: University of Auckland

In the modern engineering, it is often necessary to solve problems involving strong parametric excitation and (or) strong nonlinearity. Dynamics of micro- and nanoscale electro-mechanical systems, wave propagation in structures made of corrugated composite materials are just examples of those. Numerical methods, although able to predict systems behavior for specific sets of parameters, fail to provide an insight into underlying physics. On the other hand, conventional analytical methods impose severe restrictions on the problem parameters space and (or) on types of the solutions. Thus, the quest for advanced tools to deal with linear and nonlinear structural dynamics still continues, and the lecture is concerned with an advanced formulation of an analytical method. The principal novelty aspect is that the presence of a small parameter in governing equations is not requested, so that dynamic problems involving strong parametric excitation and (or) strong nonlinearity can be considered. Another advantage of the method is that it is free from conventional restrictions on the excitation frequency spectrum and applicable for problems involving combined multiple parametric and (or) direct excitations with incommensurate frequencies, essential for some applications. A use of the method will be illustrated in several examples, including analysis of the effects of corrugation shapes on dispersion relation and frequency band-gaps of structures and dynamics of nonlinear parametric amplifiers.

News matching "Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case"

ARC Grant successes
The School of Mathematical Sciences has again had outstanding success in the ARC Discovery and Linkage Projects schemes. Congratulations to the following staff for their success in the Discovery Project scheme: Prof Nigel Bean, Dr Josh Ross, Prof Phil Pollett, Prof Peter Taylor, New methods for improving active adaptive management in biological systems, $255,000 over 3 years; Dr Josh Ross, New methods for integrating population structure and stochasticity into models of disease dynamics, $248,000 over three years; A/Prof Matt Roughan, Dr Walter Willinger, Internet traffic-matrix synthesis, $290,000 over three years; Prof Patricia Solomon, A/Prof John Moran, Statistical methods for the analysis of critical care data, with application to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Database, $310,000 over 3 years; Prof Mathai Varghese, Prof Peter Bouwknegt, Supersymmetric quantum field theory, topology and duality, $375,000 over 3 years; Prof Peter Taylor, Prof Nigel Bean, Dr Sophie Hautphenne, Dr Mark Fackrell, Dr Malgorzata O'Reilly, Prof Guy Latouche, Advanced matrix-analytic methods with applications, $600,000 over 3 years. Congratulations to the following staff for their success in the Linkage Project scheme: Prof Simon Beecham, Prof Lee White, A/Prof John Boland, Prof Phil Howlett, Dr Yvonne Stokes, Mr John Wells, Paving the way: an experimental approach to the mathematical modelling and design of permeable pavements, $370,000 over 3 years; Dr Amie Albrecht, Prof Phil Howlett, Dr Andrew Metcalfe, Dr Peter Pudney, Prof Roderick Smith, Saving energy on trains - demonstration, evaluation, integration, $540,000 over 3 years Posted Fri 29 Oct 10.

Publications matching "Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case"

Publications
Non-commutative correspondences, duality and D-branes in bivariant K-theory
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 13 (497–552) 2009
T-duality as a duality of loop group bundles
Bouwknegt, Pier; Varghese, Mathai, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 42 (162001-1–162001-8) 2009
D-branes, KK-theory and duality on noncommutative spaces
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Print Edition) 103 (1–13) 2008
D-branes, RR-fields and duality on noncommutative manifolds
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Communications in Mathematical Physics 277 (643–706) 2008
T-Duality in type II string theory via noncommutative geometry and beyond
Varghese, Mathai, Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement 171 (237–257) 2007
On mysteriously missing T-duals, H-flux and the T-duality Group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, chapter in Differential geometry and physics (World Scientific Publishing) 350–358, 2006
Duality symmetry and the form fields of M-theory
Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Print Edition) 6 (0–10) 2006
Flux compactifications on projective spaces and the S-duality puzzle
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Jurco, B; Varghese, Mathai; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (345–394) 2006
Nonassociative Tori and Applications to T-Duality
Bouwknegt, Pier; Hannabuss, K; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 264 (41–69) 2006
T-duality for torus bundles with H-fluxes via noncommutative topology, II: the high-dimensional case and the T-duality group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (123–158) 2006
Ramaswami's duality and probabilistic algorithms for determining the rate matrix for a structured GI/M/1 Markov chain
Hunt, Emma, The ANZIAM Journal 46 (485–493) 2005
T-duality for principal torus bundles and dimensionally reduced Gysin sequences
Bouwknegt, Pier; Hannabuss, K; Varghese, Mathai, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 9 (1–25) 2005
T-duality for torus bundles with H-fluxes via noncommutative topology
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, Communications in Mathematical Physics 253 (705–721) 2005
Type IIB string theory, S-duality, and generalized cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Nuclear Physics B 715 (639–664) 2005
On the analysis of a case-control study with differential measurement error
Glonek, Garique, 20th International Workshop on Statistical Modelling, Sydney, Australia 10/07/05
T-duality for principal torus bundles
Bouwknegt, Pier; Hannabuss, K; Varghese, Mathai, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 3 (WWW 1–WWW 10) 2004
T-duality: Topology change from H-flux
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 249 (383–415) 2004
A case study of OSPF behavior in a large enterprise network
Shaikh, A; Isett, C; Greenberg, A; Roughan, Matthew; Gottlieb, J, 2nd ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Internet measurment 2002, Marseille, France, 06/11/02
Topological duality in humanoid robot dynamics
Ivancevic, V; Pearce, Charles, The ANZIAM Journal 43 (183–194) 2001
Local Constraints on Einstein-Weyl geometries: The 3-dimensional case
Eastwood, Michael; Tod, K, Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry 18 (1–27) 2000

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