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Associate Professor Nicholas Buchdahl
Reader in Pure Mathematics


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Professor Robert Elliott
Adjunct Professor


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Dr Pedram Hekmati
Adjunct Senior Lecturer


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Dr Peter Hochs
Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, Marie Curie Fellowship


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Professor Finnur Larusson
Associate Professor in Pure Mathematics


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Professor Michael Murray
Chair of Pure Mathematics


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Dr Danny Stevenson
Senior Lecturer


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Professor Mathai Varghese
Elder Professor of Mathematics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Scie


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Dr Hang Wang
ARC DECRA Fellow


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Courses matching "Representation theory"

Information theory and networks

TBA

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Number Theory III

Number theory is one of the oldest branches of mathematics. It is concerned with the properties of numbers, especially the properties of the integers. Historically, it was valued as the purest form of mathematics, but in fact there are many modern applications to information technology and cryptography. Number theory is a fundamentally useful course for any mathematician, but it also attracts a general audience because of its intrinsic beauty and its emphasis on problem-solving. Topics covered are: Divisibility and primes, congruences, arithmetic functions, continued fractions and rational approximation, quadratic residues, and primitive roots. Examples of diophantine equations. Modern applications to computer science, cryptography etc. Introduction to number-theoretic computer packages.

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Sampling Theory and Practice III

Sample surveys are an important source of statistical data. A great many published statistics on demographic, economic, political and health related characteristics are based on survey data. Simple random sampling is a well known method of sampling but, for reasons of efficiency and practical constraints, methods such as stratified sampling and cluster sampling are typically used by statistical authorities such as the Australian Bureau of Statistics and by market research organisations. This course is concerned with the design of sample surveys and the statistical analysis of data collected from such surveys. Topics covered are: experiments and surveys, steps in planning a survey; randomisation approach to sampling and estimation, sampling distribution of estimator, expected values, variances, generalisation of probability sampling; prediction approach, inadequacies of approach, decomposition of population total, concomitant variables; regression through the origin, estimation by least squares, ratio estimation, variance formulae; balance and robustness; best fit sample; stratified sampling, estimation, allocation, construction of strata, stratification on size variables, post-stratification; two-stage sampling, estimation, allocation, cluster sampling.

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Events matching "Representation theory"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
Inconsistent Mathematics
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Chris Mortensen

The Theory of Inconsistency arose historically from a number of sources, such as the semantic paradoxes including The Liar and the set-theoretic paradoxes including Russell's. But these sources are rather too closely connected with Foundationalism: the view that mathematics has a foundation such as logic or set theory or category theory etc. It soon became apparent that inconsistent mathematical structures are of interest in their own right and do not depend on the existence of foundations. This paper will survey some of the results in inconsistent mathematics and discuss the bearing on various philosophical positions including Platonism, Logicism, Hilbert's Formalism, and Brouwer's Intuitionism.
Good and Bad Vibes
15:10 Fri 23 Feb, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Maurice Dodson

Media...
Collapsing bridges and exploding rockets have been associated with vibrations in resonance with natural frequencies. As well, the stability of the solar system and the existence of solutions of Schrödinger\'s equation and the wave equation are problematic in the presence of resonances. Such resonances can be avoided, or at least mitigated, by using ideas from Diophantine approximation, a branch of number theory. Applications of Diophantine approximation to these problems will be given and will include a connection with LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), a space-based gravity wave detector under construction.
Finite Geometries: Classical Problems and Recent Developments
15:10 Fri 20 Jul, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Joseph A. Thas :: Ghent University, Belgium

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in finite projective spaces, and important applications to practical topics such as coding theory, cryptography and design of experiments have made the field even more attractive. In my talk some classical problems and recent developments will be discussed. First I will mention Segre's celebrated theorem and ovals and a purely combinatorial characterization of Hermitian curves in the projective plane over a finite field here, from the beginning, the considered pointset is contained in the projective plane over a finite field. Next, a recent elegant result on semiovals in PG(2,q), due to Gács, will be given. A second approach is where the object is described as an incidence structure satisfying certain properties; here the geometry is not a priori embedded in a projective space. This will be illustrated by a characterization of the classical inversive plane in the odd case. Another quite recent beautiful result in Galois geometry is the discovery of an infinite class of hemisystems of the Hermitian variety in PG(3,q^2), leading to new interesting classes of incidence structures, graphs and codes; before this result, just one example for GF(9), due to Segre, was known.
Add one part chaos, one part topology, and stir well...
13:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2007 :: Engineering North 132 :: Dr Matt Finn :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Stirring and mixing of fluids occurs everywhere, from adding milk to a cup of coffee, right through to industrial-scale chemical blending. So why stir in the first place? Is it possible to do it badly? And how can you make sure you do it effectively? I will attempt to answer these questions using a few thought experiments, some dynamical systems theory and a little topology.
Similarity solutions for surface-tension driven flows
15:10 Fri 14 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof John Lister :: Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK

The breakup of a mass of fluid into drops is a ubiquitous phenomenon in daily life, the natural environment and technology, with common examples including a dripping tap, ocean spray and ink-jet printing. It is a feature of many generic industrial processes such as spraying, emulsification, aeration, mixing and atomisation, and is an undesirable feature in coating and fibre spinning. Surface-tension driven pinch-off and the subsequent recoil are examples of finite-time singularities in which the interfacial curvature becomes infinite at the point of disconnection. As a result, the flow near the point of disconnection becomes self-similar and independent of initial and far-field conditions. Similarity solutions will be presented for the cases of inviscid and very viscous flow, along with comparison to experiments. In each case, a boundary-integral representation can be used both to examine the time-dependent behaviour and as the basis of a modified Newton scheme for direct solution of the similarity equations.
Global and Local stationary modelling in finance: Theory and empirical evidence
14:10 Thu 10 Apr, 2008 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Dominique Guégan :: Universite Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne

To model real data sets using second order stochastic processes imposes that the data sets verify the second order stationarity condition. This stationarity condition concerns the unconditional moments of the process. It is in that context that most of models developed from the sixties' have been studied; We refer to the ARMA processes (Brockwell and Davis, 1988), the ARCH, GARCH and EGARCH models (Engle, 1982, Bollerslev, 1986, Nelson, 1990), the SETAR process (Lim and Tong, 1980 and Tong, 1990), the bilinear model (Granger and Andersen, 1978, Guégan, 1994), the EXPAR model (Haggan and Ozaki, 1980), the long memory process (Granger and Joyeux, 1980, Hosking, 1981, Gray, Zang and Woodward, 1989, Beran, 1994, Giraitis and Leipus, 1995, Guégan, 2000), the switching process (Hamilton, 1988). For all these models, we get an invertible causal solution under specific conditions on the parameters, then the forecast points and the forecast intervals are available.

Thus, the stationarity assumption is the basis for a general asymptotic theory for identification, estimation and forecasting. It guarantees that the increase of the sample size leads to more and more information of the same kind which is basic for an asymptotic theory to make sense.

Now non-stationarity modelling has also a long tradition in econometrics. This one is based on the conditional moments of the data generating process. It appears mainly in the heteroscedastic and volatility models, like the GARCH and related models, and stochastic volatility processes (Ghysels, Harvey and Renault 1997). This non-stationarity appears also in a different way with structural changes models like the switching models (Hamilton, 1988), the stopbreak model (Diebold and Inoue, 2001, Breidt and Hsu, 2002, Granger and Hyung, 2004) and the SETAR models, for instance. It can also be observed from linear models with time varying coefficients (Nicholls and Quinn, 1982, Tsay, 1987).

Thus, using stationary unconditional moments suggest a global stationarity for the model, but using non-stationary unconditional moments or non-stationary conditional moments or assuming existence of states suggest that this global stationarity fails and that we only observe a local stationary behavior.

The growing evidence of instability in the stochastic behavior of stocks, of exchange rates, of some economic data sets like growth rates for instance, characterized by existence of volatility or existence of jumps in the variance or on the levels of the prices imposes to discuss the assumption of global stationarity and its consequence in modelling, particularly in forecasting. Thus we can address several questions with respect to these remarks.

1. What kinds of non-stationarity affect the major financial and economic data sets? How to detect them?

2. Local and global stationarities: How are they defined?

3. What is the impact of evidence of non-stationarity on the statistics computed from the global non stationary data sets?

4. How can we analyze data sets in the non-stationary global framework? Does the asymptotic theory work in non-stationary framework?

5. What kind of models create local stationarity instead of global stationarity? How can we use them to develop a modelling and a forecasting strategy?

These questions began to be discussed in some papers in the economic literature. For some of these questions, the answers are known, for others, very few works exist. In this talk I will discuss all these problems and will propose 2 new stategies and modelling to solve them. Several interesting topics in empirical finance awaiting future research will also be discussed.

The Mathematics of String Theory
15:10 Fri 2 May, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Peter Bouwknegt :: Department of Mathematics, ANU

String Theory has had, and continues to have, a profound impact on many areas of mathematics and vice versa. In this talk I want to address some relatively recent developments. In particular I will argue, following Witten and others, that D-brane charges take values in the K-theory of spacetime, rather than in integral cohomology as one might have expected. I will also explore the mathematical consequences of a particular symmetry, called T-duality, in this context. I will give an intuitive introduction into D-branes and K-theory. No prior knowledge about either String Theory, D-branes or K-theory is required.
Betti's Reciprocal Theorem for Inclusion and Contact Problems
15:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Enrico Betti (1823-1892) is recognized in the mathematics community for his pioneering contributions to topology. An equally important contribution is his formulation of the reciprocity theorem applicable to elastic bodies that satisfy the classical equations of linear elasticity. Although James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) proposed a law of reciprocal displacements and rotations in 1864, the contribution of Betti is acknowledged for its underlying formal mathematical basis and generality. The purpose of this lecture is to illustrate how Betti's reciprocal theorem can be used to full advantage to develop compact analytical results for certain contact and inclusion problems in the classical theory of elasticity. Inclusion problems are encountered in number of areas in applied mechanics ranging from composite materials to geomechanics. In composite materials, the inclusion represents an inhomogeneity that is introduced to increase either the strength or the deformability characteristics of resulting material. In geomechanics, the inclusion represents a constructed material region, such as a ground anchor, that is introduced to provide load transfer from structural systems. Similarly, contact problems have applications to the modelling of the behaviour of indentors used in materials testing to the study of foundations used to distribute loads transmitted from structures. In the study of conventional problems the inclusions and the contact regions are directly loaded and this makes their analysis quite straightforward. When the interaction is induced by loads that are placed exterior to the indentor or inclusion, the direct analysis of the problem becomes inordinately complicated both in terns of formulation of the integral equations and their numerical solution. It is shown by a set of selected examples that the application of Betti's reciprocal theorem leads to the development of exact closed form solutions to what would otherwise be approximate solutions achievable only through the numerical solution of a set of coupled integral equations.
Elliptic equation for diffusion-advection flows
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Pavel Bedrikovsetsky :: Australian School of Petroleum Science, University of Adelaide.

The standard diffusion equation is obtained by Einstein's method and its generalisation, Fokker-Plank-Kolmogorov-Feller theory. The time between jumps in Einstein derivation is constant.

We discuss random walks with residence time distribution, which occurs for flows of solutes and suspensions/colloids in porous media, CO2 sequestration in coal mines, several processes in chemical, petroleum and environmental engineering. The rigorous application of the Einstein's method results in new equation, containing the time and the mixed dispersion terms expressing the dispersion of the particle time steps.

Usually, adding the second time derivative results in additional initial data. For the equation derived, the condition of limited solution when time tends to infinity provides with uniqueness of the Caushy problem solution.

The solution of the pulse injection problem describing a common tracer injection experiment is studied in greater detail. The new theory predicts delay of the maximum of the tracer, compared to the velocity of the flow, while its forward "tail" contains much more particles than in the solution of the classical parabolic (advection-dispersion) equation. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and predictions of the direct simulation.

Symmetry-breaking and the Origin of Species
15:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Toby Elmhirst :: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University

The theory of partial differential equations can say much about generic bifurcations from spatially homogeneous steady states, but relatively little about generic bifurcations from unimodal steady states. In many applications, spatially homogeneous steady states correspond to low-energy physical states that are destabilized as energy is fed into the system, and in these cases standard PDE theory can yield some impressive and elegant results. However, for many macroscopic biological systems such results are less useful because low-energy states do not hold the same priviledged position as they do in physical and chemical systems. For example, speciation -- the evolutionary process by which new species are formed -- can be seen as the destabilization of a unimodal density distribution over phenotype space. Given the diversity of species and environments, generic results are clearly needed, but cannot be gained from PDE theory. Indeed, such questions cannot even be adequately formulated in terms of PDEs. In this talk I will introduce 'Pod Systems' which can provide an answer to the question; 'What happens, generically, when a unimodal steady state loses stability?' In the pod system formalization, the answer involves elements of equivariant bifurcation theory and suggests that new species can arise as the result of broken symmetries.
On the Henstock-Kurzweil integral (along with concerns about general math education in Europe)
15:10 Fri 13 Feb, 2009 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Jean-Pierre Demailly :: University of Grenoble, France

The talk will be the occasion to take a few minutes to describe the situation of math education in France and in Europe, to motivate the interest of the lecturer in trying to bring back rigorous proofs in integration theory. The remaining 45 minutes will be devoted to explaining the basics of Henstock-Kurzweil integration theory, which, although not a response to education problems, is a modern and elementary approach of a very strong extension of the Riemann integral, providing easy access to several fundamental results of Lebesgue theory (monotone convergence theorem, existence of Lebesgue measure, etc.).
String structures and characteristic classes for loop group bundles
13:10 Fri 1 May, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Mr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Chern-Weil homomorphism gives a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundles. In infinite dimensions, however, the standard theory fails due to analytical problems. In this talk I shall give a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundle with structure group the loop group of a compact group which side-steps these complications. This theory is inspired in some sense by results on the string class (a certain cohomology class on the base of a loop group bundle) which I shall outline.
Nonlinear diffusion-driven flow in a stratified viscous fluid
15:00 Fri 26 Jun, 2009 :: Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Associate Prof Michael Page :: Monash University

In 1970, two independent studies (by Wunsch and Phillips) of the behaviour of a linear density-stratified viscous fluid in a closed container demonstrated a slow flow can be generated simply due to the container having a sloping boundary surface This remarkable motion is generated as a result of the curvature of the lines of constant density near any sloping surface, which in turn enables a zero normal-flux condition on the density to be satisfied along that boundary. When the Rayleigh number is large (or equivalently Wunsch's parameter $R$ is small) this motion is concentrated in the near vicinity of the sloping surface, in a thin `buoyancy layer' that has many similarities to an Ekman layer in a rotating fluid.

A number of studies have since considered the consequences of this type of `diffusively-driven' flow in a semi-infinite domain, including in the deep ocean and with turbulent effects included. More recently, Page & Johnson (2008) described a steady linear theory for the broader-scale mass recirculation in a closed container and demonstrated that, unlike in previous studies, it is possible for the buoyancy layer to entrain fluid from that recirculation. That work has since been extended (Page & Johnson, 2009) to the nonlinear regime of the problem and some of the similarities to and differences from the linear case will be described in this talk. Simple and elegant analytical solutions in the limit as $R \to 0$ still exist in some situations, and they will be compared with numerical simulations in a tilted square container at small values of $R$. Further work on both the unsteady flow properties and the flow for other geometrical configurations will also be described.

Weak Hopf algebras and Frobenius algebras
13:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University

A basic example of a Hopf algebra is a group algebra: it is the vector space having the group as basis and having multiplication linearly extending that of the group. We can start with a category instead of a group, form the free vector space on the set of its morphisms, and define multiplication to be composition when possible and zero when not. The multiplication has an identity if the category has finitely many objects; this is a basic example of a weak bialgebra. It is a weak Hopf algebra when the category is a groupoid. Group algebras are also Frobenius algebras. We shall generalize weak bialgebras and Frobenius algebras to the context of monoidal categories and describe some of their theory using the geometry of string diagrams.
From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
Defect formulae for integrals of pseudodifferential symbols: applications to dimensional regularisation and index theory
13:10 Fri 4 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Sylvie Paycha :: Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France

The ordinary integral on L^1 functions on R^d unfortunately does not extend to a translation invariant linear form on the whole algebra of pseudodifferential symbols on R^d, forcing to work with ordinary linear extensions which fail to be translation invariant. Defect formulae which express the difference between various linear extensions, show that they differ by local terms involving the noncommutative residue. In particular, we shall show how integrals regularised by a "dimensional regularisation" procedure familiar to physicists differ from Hadamard finite part (or "cut-off" regularised) integrals by a residue. When extended to pseudodifferential operators on closed manifolds, these defect formulae express the zeta regularised traces of a differential operator in terms of a residue of its logarithm. In particular, we shall express the index of a Dirac type operator on a closed manifold in terms of a logarithm of a generalized Laplacian, thus giving an a priori local description of the index and shall discuss further applications.
Curved pipe flow and its stability
15:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2009 :: Badger labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The unsteady flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe is a widely occuring and well studied problem. The stability of such flows, however, has largely been overlooked; this is in marked contrast to flow through a straight-pipe, examination of which forms a cornerstone of hydrodynamic stability theory. Importantly, however, flow through a curved pipe exhibits an array of flow structures that are simply not present in the zero curvature limit, and it is natural to expect these to substantially impact upon the flow's stability. By considering two very different kinds of flows through a curved pipe, we illustrate that this can indeed be the case.
Statistical analysis for harmonized development of systemic organs in human fetuses
11:00 Thu 17 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Kanta Naito :: Shimane University

The growth processes of human babies have been studied sufficiently in scientific fields, but there have still been many issues about the developments of human fetus which are not clarified. The aim of this research is to investigate the developing process of systemic organs of human fetuses based on the data set of measurements of fetus's bodies and organs. Specifically, this talk is concerned with giving a mathematical understanding for the harmonized developments of the organs of human fetuses. The method to evaluate such harmonies is proposed by the use of the maximal dilatation appeared in the theory of quasi-conformal mapping.
Understanding hypersurfaces through tropical geometry
12:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Dr Mohammed Abouzaid :: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Given a polynomial in two or more variables, one may study the zero locus from the point of view of different mathematical subjects (number theory, algebraic geometry, ...). I will explain how tropical geometry allows to encode all topological aspects by elementary combinatorial objects called "tropical varieties." Mohammed Abouzaid received a B.S. in 2002 from the University of Richmond, and a Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Chicago under the supervision of Paul Seidel. He is interested in symplectic topology and its interactions with algebraic geometry and differential topology, in particular the homological mirror symmetry conjecture. Since 2007 he has been a postdoctoral fellow at MIT, and a Clay Mathematics Institute Research Fellow.
Stable commutator length
13:40 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Danny Calegari :: California Institute of Technology

Stable commutator length answers the question: "what is the simplest surface in a given space with prescribed boundary?" where "simplest" is interpreted in topological terms. This topological definition is complemented by several equivalent definitions - in group theory, as a measure of non-commutativity of a group; and in linear programming, as the solution of a certain linear optimization problem. On the topological side, scl is concerned with questions such as computing the genus of a knot, or finding the simplest 4-manifold that bounds a given 3-manifold. On the linear programming side, scl is measured in terms of certain functions called quasimorphisms, which arise from hyperbolic geometry (negative curvature) and symplectic geometry (causal structures). In these talks we will discuss how scl in free and surface groups is connected to such diverse phenomena as the existence of closed surface subgroups in graphs of groups, rigidity and discreteness of symplectic representations, bounding immersed curves on a surface by immersed subsurfaces, and the theory of multi- dimensional continued fractions and Klein polyhedra. Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory. He received a B.A. in 1994 from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley under the joint supervision of Andrew Casson and William Thurston. From 2000 to 2002 he was Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University, after which he joined the Caltech faculty; he became Richard Merkin Professor in 2007.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n)
13:10 Fri 16 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

Berger's classification of irreducibly represented Lie groups that can occur as holonomy groups of semi-Riemannian manifolds is a remarkable result of modern differential geometry. What is remarkable about it is that it is so short and that only so few types of geometry can occur. In Riemannian signature this is even more remarkable, taking into account that any representation of a compact Lie group admits a positive definite invariant scalar product. Hence, for any not too small n there is an abundance of irreducible subgroups of SO(n). We show that in other signatures the situation is quite different with, for example, SO(1,n) having no proper irreducible subgroups. We will show how this and the corresponding result about irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n) follows from the Karpelevich-Mostov theorem. (This is joint work with Antonio J. Di Scala, Politecnico di Torino.)
Is the price really right?
12:10 Thu 22 Oct, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Mr Sam Cohen :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Making decisions when outcomes are uncertain is a common problem we all face. In this talk I will outline some recent developments on this question from the mathematics of finance-the theory of risk measures and nonlinear expectations. I will also talk about how decisions are currently made in the finance industry, and how some simple mathematics can show where these systems are open to abuse.
Finite and infinite words in number theory
15:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Amy Glen :: Murdoch University

A 'word' is a finite or infinite sequence of symbols (called 'letters') taken from a finite non-empty set (called an 'alphabet'). In mathematics, words naturally arise when one wants to represent elements from some set (e.g., integers, real numbers, p-adic numbers, etc.) in a systematic way. For instance, expansions in integer bases (such as binary and decimal expansions) or continued fraction expansions allow us to associate with every real number a unique finite or infinite sequence of digits.

In this talk, I will discuss some old and new results in Combinatorics on Words and their applications to problems in Number Theory. In particular, by transforming inequalities between real numbers into (lexicographic) inequalities between infinite words representing their binary expansions, I will show how combinatorial properties of words can be used to completely describe the minimal intervals containing all fractional parts {x*2^n}, for some positive real number x, and for all non-negative integers n. This is joint work with Jean-Paul Allouche (Universite Paris-Sud, France).

Integrable systems: noncommutative versus commutative
14:10 Thu 4 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Cornelia Schiebold :: Mid Sweden University

After a general introduction to integrable systems, we will explain an approach to their solution theory, which is based on Banach space theory. The main point is first to shift attention to noncommutative integrable systems and then to extract information about the original setting via projection techniques. The resulting solution formulas turn out to be particularly well-suited to the qualitative study of certain solution classes. We will show how one can obtain a complete asymptotic description of the so called multiple pole solutions, a problem that was only treated for special cases before.
American option pricing in a Markov chain market model
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Robert Elliott :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

This paper considers a model for asset pricing in a world where the randomness is modeled by a Markov chain rather than Brownian motion. In this paper we develop a theory of optimal stopping and related variational inequalities for American options in this model. A version of Saigal's Lemma is established and numerical algorithms developed. This is a joint work with John van der Hoek.
Estimation of sparse Bayesian networks using a score-based approach
15:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: University of Copenhagen

The estimation of Bayesian networks given high-dimensional data sets, with more variables than there are observations, has been the focus of much recent research. These structures provide a flexible framework for the representation of the conditional independence relationships of a set of variables, and can be particularly useful in the estimation of genetic regulatory networks given gene expression data.

In this talk, I will discuss some new research on learning sparse networks, that is, networks with many conditional independence restrictions, using a score-based approach. In the case of genetic regulatory networks, such sparsity reflects the view that each gene is regulated by relatively few other genes. The presented approach allows prior information about the overall sparsity of the underlying structure to be included in the analysis, as well as the incorporation of prior knowledge about the connectivity of individual nodes within the network.

The caloron transform
13:10 Fri 7 May, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Michael Murray :: University of Adelaide

The caloron transform is a `fake' dimensional reduction which transforms a G-bundle over certain manifolds to a loop group of G bundle over a manifold of one lower dimension. This talk will review the caloron transform and show how it can be best understood using the language of pseudo-isomorphisms from category theory as well as considering its application to Bogomolny monopoles and string structures.
Two problems in porous media flow
15:10 Tue 11 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Graeme Hocking :: Murdoch University

I will discuss two problems in porous media flow.

On a tropical island, fresh water may sit in the soil beneath the ground, floating on the ocean's salt water. This water is a valuable resource for the inhabitants, but requires sufficient rainfall to recharge the lens. In this paper, Green's functions are used to derive an integral equation to satisfy all of the conditions except those on the interfaces, which are then solved for numerically. Conditions under which the lens can be maintained will be described. This is work I did with an Honours student, Sue Chen, who is now at U. Melbourne.

In the second problem, I will discuss an "exact" solution to a problem in withdrawal from an unconfined aquifer. The problem formulation gives rise to a singular integral equation that can be solved using a nice orthogonality result I first met in airfoil theory. This is work with Hong Zhang from Griffith University.

Spot the difference: how to tell when two things are the same (and when they're not!)
13:10 Wed 19 May, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

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High on a mathematician's to-do list is classifying objects and structures that arise in mathematics. We see patterns in things and want to know what other sorts of things behave similarly. This poses several problems. How can you tell when two seemingly different mathematical objects are the same? Can you even tell when two seemingly similar mathematical objects are the same? In fact, what does "the same" even mean? How can you tell if two things are the same when you can't even see them! In this talk, we will take a walk through some areas of maths known as algebraic topology and category theory and I will show you some of the ways mathematicians have devised to tell when two things are "the same".
A variance constraining ensemble Kalman filter: how to improve forecast using climatic data of unobserved variables
15:10 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Georg Gottwald :: The University of Sydney

Data assimilation aims to solve one of the fundamental problems ofnumerical weather prediction - estimating the optimal state of the atmosphere given a numerical model of the dynamics, and sparse, noisy observations of the system. A standard tool in attacking this filtering problem is the Kalman filter.

We consider the problem when only partial observations are available. In particular we consider the situation where the observational space consists of variables which are directly observable with known observational error, and of variables of which only their climatic variance and mean are given. We derive the corresponding Kalman filter in a variational setting.

We analyze the variance constraining Kalman filter (VCKF) filter for a simple linear toy model and determine its range of optimal performance. We explore the variance constraining Kalman filter in an ensemble transform setting for the Lorenz-96 system, and show that incorporating the information on the variance on some un-observable variables can improve the skill and also increase the stability of the data assimilation procedure.

Using methods from dynamical systems theory we then systems where the un-observed variables evolve deterministically but chaotically on a fast time scale.

This is joint work with Lewis Mitchell and Sebastian Reich.

Vertex algebras and variational calculus I
13:10 Fri 4 Jun, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

A basic operation in calculus of variations is the Euler-Lagrange variational derivative, whose kernel determines the extremals of functionals. There exists a natural resolution of this operator, called the variational complex. In this talk, I shall explain how to use tools from the theory of vertex algebras to explicitly construct the variational complex. This also provides a very convenient language for classifying and constructing integrable Hamiltonian evolution equations.
Topological chaos in two and three dimensions
15:10 Fri 18 Jun, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Matt Finn :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Research into two-dimensional laminar fluid mixing has enjoyed a renaissance in the last decade since the realisation that the Thurston–Nielsen theory of surface homeomorphisms can assist in designing efficient "topologically chaotic" batch mixers. In this talk I will survey some tools used in topological fluid kinematics, including braid groups, train-tracks, dynamical systems and topological index formulae. I will then make some speculations about topological chaos in three dimensions.
On affine BMW algebras
13:10 Fri 25 Jun, 2010 :: Napier 208 :: Prof Arun Ram :: University of Melbourne

I will describe a family of algebras of tangles (which give rise to link invariants following the methods of Reshetikhin-Turaev and Jones) and describe some aspects of their structure and their representation theory. The main goal will be to explain how to use universal Verma modules for the symplectic group to compute the representation theory of affine BMW (Birman-Murakami-Wenzl) algebras.
The Glass Bead Game
15:10 Fri 25 Jun, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Arun Ram :: University of Melbourne

This title is taken from the novel of Hermann Hesse. In joint work with A. Kleshchev, we were amused to discover a glass bead game for constructing representations of quiver Hecke algebras (algebras recently defined by Khovanov-Lauda and Rouquier whose representation theory categorifies quantum groups of Kac-Moody Lie algebras). In fact, the glass bead game is tantalizingly simple, and may soon be marketed in your local toy store. I will explain how this game works, and some of the fascinating numerology that appears in the scoring of the plays.
Higher nonunital Quillen K'-theory
13:10 Fri 23 Jul, 2010 :: Engineering-Maths G06 :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: University of Adelaide

Quillen introduced a $K'_0$-theory for possibly nonunital rings and showed that it agrees with the usual algebraic $K_0$-theory if the ring is unital. We shall introduce higher $K'$-groups for $k$-algebras, where $k$ is a field, and discuss some elementary properties of this theory. We shall also show that for stable $C*$-algebras the higher $K'$-theory agrees with the topological $K$-theory. If time permits we shall explain how this provides a formalism to treat topological $\mathbb{T}$-dualities via Kasparov's bivariant $K$-theory.
The two envelope problem
12:10 Wed 11 Aug, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Gary Glonek :: University of Adelaide

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The two envelope problem is a long standing paradox in probability theory. Although its formulation has elements in common with the celebrated Monty Hall problem, the underlying paradox is apparently far more subtle. In this talk, the problem will be explained and various aspects of the paradox will be discussed. Connections to Bayesian inference and other areas of statistics will be explored.
Index theory in the noncommutative world
13:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

The aim of the talk is to give an overview of the noncommutative geometry approach to index theory.
Index theory in Mathematics and Physics
15:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

This lecture is a personal (and partly historical) overview in non-technical terms of the topic described in the title, from first year linear algebra to von Neumann algebras.
A classical construction for simplicial sets revisited
13:10 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Glasgow

Simplicial sets became popular in the 1950s as a combinatorial way to study the homotopy theory of topological spaces. They are more robust than the older notion of simplicial complexes, which were introduced for the same purpose. In this talk, which will be as introductory as possible, we will review some classical functors arising in the theory of simplicial sets, some well-known, some not-so-well-known. We will re-examine the proof of an old theorem of Kan in light of these functors. We will try to keep all jargon to a minimum.
Compound and constrained regression analyses for EIV models
15:05 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wei Zhu :: State University of New York at Stony Brook

In linear regression analysis, randomness often exists in the independent variables and the resulting models are referred to errors-in-variables (EIV) models. The existing general EIV modeling framework, the structural model approach, is parametric and dependent on the usually unknown underlying distributions. In this work, we introduce a general non-parametric EIV modeling framework, the compound regression analysis, featuring an intuitive geometric representation and a 1-1 correspondence to the structural model. Properties, examples and further generalizations of this new modeling approach are discussed in this talk.
On some applications of higher Quillen K'-theory
13:10 Fri 3 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: University of Adelaide

In my previous talk I introduced a functor from the category of k-algebras (k field) to abelian groups, called KQ-theory. In this talk I will explain its relationship with topological (homological) T-dualities and twisted K-theory.
Contraction subgroups in locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

For each automorphism, $\alpha$, of the locally compact group $G$ there is a corresponding {\sl contraction subgroup\/}, $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$, which is the set of $x\in G$ such that $\alpha^n(x)$ converges to the identity as $n\to \infty$. Contractions subgroups are important in representation theory, through the Mautner phenomenon, and in the study of convolution semigroups. If $G$ is a Lie group, then $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ is automatically closed, can be described in terms of eigenvalues of $\hbox{ad}(\alpha)$, and is nilpotent. Since any connected group may be approximated by Lie groups, contraction subgroups of connected groups are thus well understood. Following a general introduction, the talk will focus on contraction subgroups of totally disconnected groups. A criterion for non-triviality of $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ will be described (joint work with U.~Baumgartner) and a structure theorem for $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ when it is closed will be presented (joint with H.~Gl\"oeckner).
Totally disconnected, locally compact groups
15:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

Locally compact groups occur in many branches of mathematics. Their study falls into two cases: connected groups, which occur as automorphisms of smooth structures such as spheres for example; and totally disconnected groups, which occur as automorphisms of discrete structures such as trees. The talk will give an overview of the currently developing structure theory of totally disconnected locally compact groups. Techniques for analysing totally disconnected groups will be described that correspond to the familiar Lie group methods used to treat connected groups. These techniques played an essential role in the recent solution of a problem raised by R. Zimmer and G. Margulis concerning commensurated subgroups of arithmetic groups.
Principal Component Analysis Revisited
15:10 Fri 15 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Assoc. Prof Inge Koch :: University of Adelaide

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been an important tool in the analysis of multivariate data. The principal components summarise data in fewer than the original number of variables without losing essential information, and thus allow a split of the data into signal and noise components. PCA is a linear method, based on elegant mathematical theory. The increasing complexity of data together with the emergence of fast computers in the later parts of the 20th century has led to a renaissance of PCA. The growing numbers of variables (in particular, high-dimensional low sample size problems), non-Gaussian data, and functional data (where the data are curves) are posing exciting challenges to statisticians, and have resulted in new research which extends the classical theory. I begin with the classical PCA methodology and illustrate the challenges presented by the complex data that we are now able to collect. The main part of the talk focuses on extensions of PCA: the duality of PCA and the Principal Coordinates of Multidimensional Scaling, Sparse PCA, and consistency results relating to principal components, as the dimension grows. We will also look at newer developments such as Principal Component Regression and Supervised PCA, nonlinear PCA and Functional PCA.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Dirac operators in geometry, topology, representation theory, and physics
10:00 Mon 18 Oct, 2010 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Dan Freed :: University of Texas, Austin

Lecture Series by Dan Freed (University of Texas, Austin). Dirac introduced his eponymous operator to describe electrons in quantum theory. It was rediscovered by Atiyah and Singer in their study of the index problem on manifolds. In these lectures we explore new theorems and applications. Several of these also involve K-theory in its recent twisted and differential variations. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage: http://www.iga.adelaide.edu.au/workshops/WorkshopOct2010/
Higher stacks and homotopy theory II: the motivic context
13:10 Thu 16 Dec, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Mr James Wallbridge :: University of Adelaide and Institut de mathematiques de Toulouse

In part I of this talk (JC seminar May 2008) we presented motivation and the basic definitions for building homotopy theory into an arbitrary category by introducing the notion of (higher) stacks. In part II we consider a specific example on the category of schemes to illustrate how the machinery works in practice. It will lead us into motivic territory (if we like it or not).
Heat transfer scaling and emergence of three-dimensional flow in horizontal convection
15:10 Fri 25 Feb, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Greg Sheard :: Monash University

Horizontal convecton refers to flows driven by uneven heating on a horizontal forcing boundary. Flows exhibiting these characteristics are prevalent in nature, and include the North-South Hadley circulation within the atmosphere between warmer and more temperate latitudes, as well as ocean currents driven by non-uniform heating via solar radiation.

Here a model for these generic convection flows is established featuring a rectangular enclosure, insulated on the side and top walls, and driven by a linear temperature gradient applied along the bottom wall. Rayleigh number dependence of heat transfer through the forcing boundary is computed and compared with theory. Attention is given to transitions in the flow, including the development of unsteady flow and three-dimensional flow: the effect of these transitions on the Nusselt-Rayleigh number scaling exponents is described.

Surface quotients of hyperbolic buildings
13:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

Let I(p,v) be Bourdon's building, the unique simply-connected 2-complex such that all 2-cells are regular right-angled hyperbolic p-gons, and the link at each vertex is the complete bipartite graph K_{v,v}. We investigate and mostly determine the set of triples (p,v,g) for which there is a discrete group acting on I(p,v) so that the quotient is a compact orientable surface of genus g. Surprisingly, the existence of such a quotient depends upon the value of v. The remaining cases lead to open questions in tessellations of surfaces and in number theory. We use elementary group theory, combinatorics, algebraic topology and number theory. This is joint work with David Futer.
Operator algebra quantum groups
13:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: University of Adelaide

Woronowicz initiated the study of quantum groups using C*-algebras. His framework enabled him to deal with compact (linear) quantum groups. In this talk we shall introduce a notion of quantum groups that can handle infinite dimensional examples like SU(\infty). We shall also study some quantum homogeneous spaces associated to this group and compute their K-theory groups. This is joint work with V. Mathai.
Spherical tube hypersurfaces
13:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

We consider smooth real hypersurfaces in a complex vector space. Specifically, we are interested in tube hypersurfaces, i.e., hypersurfaces represented as the direct product of the imaginary part of the space and hypersurfaces lying in its real part. Tube hypersurfaces arise, for instance, as the boundaries of tube domains. The study of tube domains is a classical subject in several complex variables and complex geometry, which goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. Indeed, already Siegel found it convenient to realise certain symmetric domains as tubes. One can endow a tube hypersurface with a so-called CR-structure, which is the remnant of the complex structure on the ambient vector space. We impose on the CR-structure the condition of sphericity. One way to state this condition is to require a certain curvature (called the CR-curvature of the hypersurface) to vanish identically. Spherical tube hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties and are of interest from both the complex-geometric and affine-geometric points of view. I my talk I will give an overview of the theory of such hypersurfaces. In particular, I will mention an algebraic construction arising from this theory that has applications in abstract commutative algebra and singularity theory. I will speak about these applications in detail in my colloquium talk later today.
Algebraic hypersurfaces arising from Gorenstein algebras
15:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

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To every Gorenstein algebra of finite dimension greater than 1 over a field of characteristic zero, and a projection on its maximal ideal with range equal to the annihilator of the ideal, one can associate a certain algebraic hypersurface lying in the ideal. Such hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties. They can be used, for instance, to help decide whether two given Gorenstein algebras are isomorphic, which for the case of complex numbers leads to interesting consequences in singularity theory. Also, for the case of real numbers such hypersurfaces naturally arise in CR-geometry. In my talk I will discuss these hypersurfaces and some of their applications.
How to value risk
12:10 Mon 11 Apr, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Leo Shen :: University of Adelaide

A key question in mathematical finance is: given a future random payoff X, what is its value today? If X represents a loss, one can ask how risky is X. To mitigate risk it must be modelled and quantified. The finance industry has used Value-at-Risk and conditional Value-at-Risk as measures. However, these measures are not time consistent and Value-at-Risk can penalize diversification. A modern theory of risk measures is being developed which is related to solutions of backward stochastic differential equations in continuous time and stochastic difference equations in discrete time. I first review risk measures used in mathematical finance, including static and dynamic risk measures. I recall results relating to backward stochastic difference equations (BSDEs) associated with a single jump process. Then I evaluate some numerical examples of the solutions of the backward stochastic difference equations and related risk measures. These concepts are new. I hope the examples will indicate how they might be used.
The Extended-Domain-Eigenfunction Method: making old mathematics work for new problems
15:10 Fri 13 May, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Stan Miklavcic :: University of South Australia

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Standard analytical solutions to elliptic boundary value problems on asymmetric domains are rarely, if ever, obtainable. Several years ago I proposed a solution technique to cope with such complicated domains. It involves the embedding of the original domain into one with simple boundaries where the classical eigenfunction solution approach can be used. The solution in the larger domain, when restricted to the original domain is then the solution of the original boundary value problem. In this talk I will present supporting theory for this idea, some numerical results for the particular case of the Laplace equation and the Stokes flow equations in two-dimensions and discuss advantages and limitations of the proposal.
From group action to Kontsevich's Swiss-Cheese conjecture through categorification
15:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

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The Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture is a deep generalization of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains which plays an important role in the deformation quantization theory. Categorification is a method of thinking about mathematics by replacing set theoretical concepts by some higher dimensional objects. Categorification is somewhat of an art because there is no exact recipe for doing this. It is, however, a very powerful method of understanding (and producing) many deep results starting from simple facts we learned as undergraduate students. In my talk I will explain how Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture can be easily understood as a special case of categorification of a very familiar statement: an action of a group G (more generally, a monoid) on a set X is the same as group homomorphism from G to the group of automorphisms of X (monoid of endomorphisms of X in the case of a monoid action).
Towards Rogers-Ramanujan identities for the Lie algebra A_n
13:10 Fri 5 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ole Warnaar :: University of Queensland

The Rogers-Ramanujan identities are a pair of q-series identities proved by Leonard Rogers in 1894 which became famous two decades later as conjectures of Srinivasa Ramanujan. Since the 1980s it is known that the Rogers-Ramanujan identities are in fact identities for characters of certain modules for the affine Lie algebra A_1. This poses the obvious question as to whether there exist Rogers-Ramanujan identities for higher rank affine Lie algebras. In this talk I will describe some recent progress on this problem. I will also discuss a seemingly mysterious connection with the representation theory of quivers over finite fields.
The Selberg integral
15:10 Fri 5 Aug, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ole Warnaar :: University of Queensland

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In this talk I will give a gentle introduction to the mathematics surrounding the Selberg integral. Selberg's integral, which first appeared in two rather unusual papers by Atle Selberg in the 1940s, has become famous as much for its association with (other) mathematical greats such as Enrico Bombieri and Freeman Dyson as for its importance in algebra (Coxeter groups), geometry (hyperplane arrangements) and number theory (the Riemann hypothesis). In this talk I will review the remarkable history of the Selberg integral and discuss some of its early applications. Time permitting I will end the talk by describing some of my own, ongoing work on Selberg integrals related to Lie algebras.
AustMS/AMSI Mahler Lecture: Chaos, quantum mechanics and number theory
18:00 Tue 9 Aug, 2011 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

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The correspondence principle in quantum mechanics is concerned with the relation between a mechanical system and its quantization. When the mechanical system are relatively orderly ("integrable"), then this relation is well understood. However when the system is chaotic much less is understood. The key features already appear and are well illustrated in the simplest systems which we will review. For chaotic systems defined number-theoretically, much more is understood and the basic problems are connected with central questions in number theory. The Mahler lectures are a biennial activity organised by the Australian Mathematical Society with the assistance of the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute.
Boundaries of unsteady Lagrangian Coherent Structures
15:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: Connecticut College, USA and the University of Adelaide

For steady flows, the boundaries of Lagrangian Coherent Structures are segments of manifolds connected to fixed points. In the general unsteady situation, these boundaries are time-varying manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories. Locating these boundaries, and attempting to meaningfully quantify fluid flux across them, is difficult since they are moving with time. This talk uses a newly developed tangential movement theory to locate these boundaries in nearly-steady compressible flows.
There are no magnetically charged particle-like solutions of the Einstein-Yang-Mills equations for models with Abelian residual groups
13:10 Fri 19 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Todd Oliynyk :: Monash University

According to a conjecture from the 90's, globally regular, static, spherically symmetric (i.e. particle-like) solutions with nonzero total magnetic charge are not expected to exist in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory. In this talk, I will describe recent work done in collaboration with M. Fisher where we establish the validity of this conjecture under certain restrictions on the residual gauge group. Of particular interest is that our non-existence results apply to the most widely studied models with Abelian residual groups.
Comparing Einstein to Newton via the post-Newtonian expansions
15:10 Fri 19 Aug, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Todd Oliynyk :: Monash University

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Einstein's general relativity is presently the most accurate theory of gravity. To completely determine the gravitational field, the Einstein field equations must be solved. These equations are extremely complex and outside of a small set of idealized situations, they are impossible to solve directly. However, to make physical predictions or understand physical phenomena, it is often enough to find approximate solutions that are governed by a simpler set of equations. For example, Newtonian gravity approximates general relativity very well in regimes where the typical velocity of the gravitating matter is small compared to the speed of light. Indeed, Newtonian gravity successfully explains much of the behaviour of our solar system and is a simpler theory of gravity. However, for many situations of interest ranging from binary star systems to GPS satellites, the Newtonian approximation is not accurate enough; general relativistic effects must be included. This desire to include relativistic corrections to Newtonian gravity lead to the development of the post-Newtonian expansions.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
10:00 Mon 5 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli

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Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage.
Twisted Morava K-theory
13:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

Morava's extraordinary K-theories K(n) are a family of generalized cohomology theories which behave in some ways like K-theory (indeed, K(1) is mod 2 K-theory). Their construction exploits Quillen's description of cobordism in terms of formal group laws and Lubin-Tate's methods in class field theory for constructing abelian extensions of number fields. Constructed from homotopy-theoretic methods, they do not admit a geometric description (like deRham cohomology, K-theory, or cobordism), but are nonetheless subtle, computable invariants of topological spaces. In this talk, I will give an introduction to these theories, and explain how it is possible to define an analogue of twisted K-theory in this setting. Traditionally, K-theory is twisted by a three-dimensional cohomology class; in this case, K(n) admits twists by (n+2)-dimensional classes. This work is joint with Hisham Sati.
Configuration spaces in topology and geometry
15:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

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Configuration spaces of points in R^n give a family of interesting geometric objects. They and their variants have numerous applications in geometry, topology, representation theory, and number theory. In this talk, we will review several of these manifestations (for instance, as moduli spaces, function spaces, and the like), and use them to address certain conjectures in number theory regarding distributions of number fields.
T-duality via bundle gerbes I
13:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Understanding the dynamics of event networks
15:00 Wed 28 Sep, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Amber Tomas :: The University of Oxford

Within many populations there are frequent communications between pairs of individuals. Such communications might be emails sent within a company, radio communications in a disaster zone or diplomatic communications between states. Often it is of interest to understand the factors that drive the observed patterns of such communications, or to study how these factors are changing over over time. Communications can be thought of as events occuring on the edges of a network which connects individuals in the population. In this talk I'll present a model for such communications which uses ideas from social network theory to account for the complex correlation structure between events. Applications to the Enron email corpus and the dynamics of hospital ward transfer patterns will be discussed.
T-duality via bundle gerbes II
13:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Dirac operators on classifying spaces
13:10 Fri 28 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

The Dirac operator was introduced by Paul Dirac in 1928 as the formal square root of the D'Alembert operator. Thirty years later it was rediscovered in Euclidean signature by Atiyah and Singer in their seminal work on index theory. In this talk I will describe efforts to construct a Dirac type operator on the classifying space for odd complex K-theory. Ultimately the aim is to produce a projective family of Fredholm operators realising elements in twisted K-theory of a certain moduli stack.
Oka theory of blow-ups
13:10 Fri 18 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

This talk is a continuation of my talk last August. I will discuss the recently-obtained answers to the open questions I described then.
Stability analysis of nonparallel unsteady flows via separation of variables
15:30 Fri 18 Nov, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Georgy Burde :: Ben-Gurion University

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The problem of variables separation in the linear stability equations, which govern the disturbance behavior in viscous incompressible fluid flows, is discussed. Stability of some unsteady nonparallel three-dimensional flows (exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations) is studied via separation of variables using a semi-analytical, semi-numerical approach. In this approach, a solution with separated variables is defined in a new coordinate system which is sought together with the solution form. As the result, the linear stability problems are reduced to eigenvalue problems for ordinary differential equations which can be solved numerically. In some specific cases, the eigenvalue problems can be solved analytically. Those unique examples of exact (explicit) solution of the nonparallel unsteady flow stability problems provide a very useful test for methods used in the hydrodynamic stability theory. Exact solutions of the stability problems for some stagnation-type flows are presented.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
String Theory and the Quest for Quantum Spacetime
15:10 Fri 9 Mar, 2012 :: Ligertwood 333 Law Lecture Theatre 2 :: Prof Rajesh Gopakumar :: Harish-Chandra Research Institute

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Space and time together constitute one of the most basic elements of physical reality. Since Einstein spacetime has become an active participant in the dynamics of the gravitational force. However, our notion of a quantum spacetime is still rudimentary. String theory, building upon hints provided from the physics of black holes, seems to be suggesting a very novel, "holographic" picture of what quantum spacetime might be. This relies on some very surprising connections of gravity with quantum field theories (which provide the framework for the description of the other fundamental interactions of nature). In this talk, I will try and convey some of the flavour of these connections as well as its significance.
IGA Workshop: Dualities in field theories and the role of K-theory
09:30 Mon 19 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Jonathan Rosenberg :: University of Maryland

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Lecture series by Jonathan Rosenberg (University of Maryland). There will be additional talks by other invited speakers.
The de Rham Complex
12:10 Mon 19 Mar, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Michael Albanese :: University of Adelaide

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The de Rham complex is of fundamental importance in differential geometry. After first introducing differential forms (in the familiar setting of Euclidean space), I will demonstrate how the de Rham complex elegantly encodes one half (in a sense which will become apparent) of the results from vector calculus. If there is time, I will indicate how results from the remaining half of the theory can be concisely expressed by a single, far more general theorem.
Financial risk measures - the theory and applications of backward stochastic difference/differential equations with respect to the single jump process
12:10 Mon 26 Mar, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Bin Shen :: University of Adelaide

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This is my PhD thesis submitted one month ago. Chapter 1 introduces the backgrounds of the research fields. Then each chapter is a published or an accepted paper. Chapter 2, to appear in Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Difference Equations with respect to the single jump process in discrete time. Chapter 3, published in Stochastic Analysis and Applications, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Differential Equations with respect to the single jump process in continuous time. Chapter 2 and 3 consist of Part I Theory. Chapter 4, published in Expert Systems With Applications, gives some examples about how to measure financial risks by the theory established in Chapter 2. Chapter 5, accepted by Journal of Applied Probability, considers the question of an optimal transaction between two investors to minimize their risks. It's the applications of the theory established in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 and 5 consist of Part II Applications.
Bundle gerbes and the Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly
13:10 Fri 30 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly arises in the quantisation of fermions interacting with external gauge potentials. Mathematically, it can be described as a certain lifting problem for an extension of groups. The theory of bundle gerbes is very useful for studying lifting problems, however it only applies in the case of a central extension whereas in the study of the FMS anomaly the relevant extension is non-central. In this talk I will explain how to describe this anomaly indirectly using bundle gerbes and how to use a generalisation of bundle gerbes to describe the (non-central) lifting problem directly. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati, Michael Murray and Danny Stevenson.
New examples of totally disconnected, locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

I will attempt to explain what a totally disconnected, locally compact group is, and then describe some new work with George Willis on an attempt to create new examples based on Baumslag-Solitar groups, which are well known, tried and tested examples/counterexamples in geometric/combinatorial group theory. I will describe how to compute invariants of scale and flat rank for these groups.
What is a self-similar group?
15:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

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I will give a brief introduction to the theory of self-similar groups, focusing on a couple of pertinent examples: Grigorchuk's group of intermediate growth, and the basilica group.
Acyclic embeddings of open Riemann surfaces into new examples of elliptic manifolds
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

In complex geometry a manifold is Stein if there are, in a certain sense, "many" holomorphic maps from the manifold into C^n. While this has long been well understood, a fruitful definition of the dual notion has until recently been elusive. In Oka theory, a manifold is Oka if it satisfies several equivalent definitions, each stating that the manifold has "many" holomorphic maps into it from C^n. Related to this is the geometric condition of ellipticity due to Gromov, who showed that it implies a complex manifold is Oka. We present recent contributions to three open questions involving elliptic and Oka manifolds. We show that affine quotients of C^n are elliptic, and combine this with an example of Margulis to construct new elliptic manifolds of interesting homotopy types. It follows that every open Riemann surface properly acyclically embeds into an elliptic manifold, extending an existing result for open Riemann surfaces with abelian fundamental group.
Index type invariants for twisted signature complexes
13:10 Fri 11 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Atiyah-Patodi-Singer proved an index theorem for non-local boundary conditions in the 1970's that has been widely used in mathematics and mathematical physics. A key application of their theory gives the index theorem for signature operators on oriented manifolds with boundary. As a consequence, they defined certain secondary invariants that were metric independent. I will discuss some recent work with Benameur where we extend the APS theory to signature operators twisted by an odd degree closed differential form, and study the corresponding secondary invariants.
The change of probability measure for jump processes
12:10 Mon 28 May, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

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In financial derivatives pricing theory, it is very common to change the probability measure from historical measure "real world" into a Risk-Neutral measure as a development of the non arbitrage condition. Girsanov theorem is the most known example of this technique and is used when prices randomness is modelled by Brownian motions. Other genuine candidates for modelling market randomness that have proved efficiency in recent literature are jump process, so how can a change of measure be performed for such processes? This talk will address this question by introducing the non arbitrage condition, discussing Girsanov theorem for diffusion and jump processes and presenting a concrete example.
Geometric modular representation theory
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Anthony Henderson :: University of Sydney

Representation theory is one of the oldest areas of algebra, but many basic questions in it are still unanswered. This is especially true in the modular case, where one considers vector spaces over a field F of positive characteristic; typically, complications arise for particular small values of the characteristic. For example, from a vector space V one can construct the symmetric square S^2(V), which is one easy example of a representation of the group GL(V). One would like to say that this representation is irreducible, but that statement is not always true: if F has characteristic 2, there is a nontrivial invariant subspace. Even for GL(V), we do not know the dimensions of all irreducible representations in all characteristics. In this talk, I will introduce some of the main ideas of geometric modular representation theory, a more recent approach which is making progress on some of these old problems. Essentially, the strategy is to re-formulate everything in terms of homology of various topological spaces, where F appears only as the field of coefficients and the spaces themselves are independent of F; thus, the modular anomalies in representation theory arise because homology with modular coefficients is detecting something about the topology that rational coefficients do not. In practice, the spaces are usually varieties over the complex numbers, and homology is replaced by intersection cohomology to take into account the singularities of these varieties.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
IGA Workshop: Dendroidal sets
14:00 Tue 12 Jun, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Ittay Weiss :: University of the South Pacific

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A series of four 2-hour lectures by Dr. Ittay Weiss. The theory of dendroidal sets was introduced by Moerdijk and Weiss in 2007 in the study of homotopy operads in algebraic topology. In the five years that have past since then several fundamental and highly non-trivial results were established. For instance, it was established that dendroidal sets provide models for homotopy operads in a way that extends the Joyal-Lurie approach to homotopy categories. It can be shown that dendroidal sets provide new models in the study of n-fold loop spaces. And it is very recently shown that dendroidal sets model all connective spectra in a way that extends the modeling of certain spectra by Picard groupoids. The aim of the lecture series will be to introduce the concepts mentioned above, present the elementary theory, and understand the scope of the results mentioned as well as discuss the potential for further applications. Sources for the course will include the article "From Operads to Dendroidal Sets" (in the AMS volume on mathematical foundations of quantum field theory (also on the arXiv)) and the lecture notes by Ieke Moerdijk "simplicial methods for operads and algebraic geometry" which resulted from an advanced course given in Barcelona 3 years ago. No prior knowledge of operads will be assumed nor any knowledge of homotopy theory that is more advanced then what is required for the definition of the fundamental group. The basics of the language of presheaf categories will be recalled quickly and used freely.
Introduction to quantales via axiomatic analysis
13:10 Fri 15 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Ittay Weiss :: University of the South Pacific

Quantales were introduced by Mulvey in 1986 in the context of non-commutative topology with the aim of providing a concrete non-commutative framework for the foundations of quantum mechanics. Since then quantales found applications in other areas as well, among others in the work of Flagg. Flagg considers certain special quantales, called value quantales, that are desigend to capture the essential properties of ([0,\infty],\le,+) that are relevant for analysis. The result is a well behaved theory of value quantale enriched metric spaces. I will introduce the notion of quantales as if they were desigend for just this purpose, review most of the known results (since there are not too many), and address a some new results, conjectures, and questions.
K-theory and unbounded Fredholm operators
13:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Jerry Kaminker :: University of California, Davis

There are several ways of viewing elements of K^1(X). One of these is via families of unbounded self-adjoint Fredholm operators on X. Each operator will have discrete spectrum, with infinitely many positive and negative eigenvalues of finite multiplicity. One can associate to such a family a geometric object, its graph, and the Chern character and other invariants of the family can be studied from this perspective. By restricting the dimension of the eigenspaces one may sometimes use algebraic topology to completely determine the family up to equivalence. This talk will describe the general framework and some applications to families on low-dimensional manifolds where the methods work well. Various notions related to spectral flow, the index gerbe and Berry phase play roles which will be discussed. This is joint work with Ron Douglas.
Complex geometry and operator theory
14:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Ron Douglas :: Texas A&M University

In the study of bounded operators on Hilbert spaces of holomorphic functions, concepts and techniques from complex geometry are important. An anti-holomorphic bundle exists on which one can define the Chern connection. Its curvature turns out to be a complete invariant and various operator notions can't be reframed in terms of geometrical ones which leads to the solution of some problems. We will discuss this approach with an emphasis on natural examples in the one and multivariable case.
The Banach-Tarski Paradox
11:10 Mon 30 Jul, 2012 :: G.07 Engineering Mathematics :: Mr William Crawford :: University of Adelaide

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The Banach-Tarski Paradox is one of the most counter intuitive results in set theory. It states that a ball can be cut up into a finite number of pieces, which using just rotations and translations can be reassembled into two identical copies of the original ball. This contradicts our naive belief that cutting, rotating and translating objects in Euclidean space should preserve volume. However the construction of the "cutting" is heavily dependent on the axiom of choice, and the resultant pieces are non-measurable, i.e. no consistent notion of volume can be assigned to them. A stronger form of the theorem states that any two bounded subsets of R^3 with non-empty interior are equidecomposable, that is one can be disassembled and reassembled into the other. I'll be going through a brief proof of the theorem (and in doing so further alienate the pure mathematicians in the room from everybody else).
The motivic logarithm and its realisations
13:10 Fri 3 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr James Borger :: Australian National University

When a complex manifold is defined by polynomial equations, its cohomology groups inherit extra structure. This was discovered by Hodge in the 1920s and 30s. When the defining polynomials have rational coefficients, there is some additional, arithmetic structure on the cohomology. This was discovered by Grothendieck and others in the 1960s. But here the situation is still quite mysterious because each cohomology group has infinitely many different arithmetic structures and while they are not directly comparable, they share many properties---with each other and with the Hodge structure. All written accounts of this that I'm aware of treat arbitrary varieties. They are beautifully abstract and non-explicit. In this talk, I'll take the opposite approach and try to give a flavour of the subject by working out a perhaps the simplest nontrivial example, the cohomology of C* relative to a subset of two points, in beautifully concrete and explicit detail. Here the common motif is the logarithm. In Hodge theory, it is realised as the complex logarithm; in the crystalline theory, it's as the p-adic logarithm; and in the etale theory, it's as Kummer theory. I'll assume you have some familiarity with usual, singular cohomology of topological spaces, but I won't assume that you know anything about these non-topological cohomology theories.
Drawing of Viscous Threads with Temperature-dependent Viscosity
14:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North N218 :: Dr Jonathan Wylie :: City University of Hong Kong

The drawing of viscous threads is important in a wide range of industrial applications and is a primary manufacturing process in the optical fiber and textile industries. Most of the materials used in these processes have viscosities that vary extremely strongly with temperature. We investigate the role played by viscous heating in the drawing of viscous threads. Usually, the effects of viscous heating and inertia are neglected because the parameters that characterize them are typically very small. However, by performing a detailed theoretical analysis we surprisingly show that even very small amounts of viscous heating can lead to a runaway phenomena. On the other hand, inertia prevents runaway, and the interplay between viscous heating and inertia results in very complicated dynamics for the system. Even more surprisingly, in the absence of viscous heating, we find that a new type of instability can occur when a thread is heated by a radiative heat source. By analyzing an asymptotic limit of the Navier-Stokes equation we provide a theory that describes the nature of this instability and explains the seemingly counterintuitive behavior.
The fundamental theorems of invariant theory, classical and quantum
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: The University of Sydney

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Let V = C^n, and let (-,-) be a non-degenerate bilinear form on V , which is either symmetric or anti-symmetric. Write G for the isometry group of (V , (-,-)); thus G = O_n (C) or Sp_n (C). The first fundamental theorem (FFT) provides a set of generators for End_G(V^{\otimes r} ) (r = 1, 2, . . . ), while the second fundamental theorem (SFT) gives all relations among the generators. In 1937, Brauer formulated the FFT in terms of his celebrated 'Brauer algebra' B_r (\pm n), but there has hitherto been no similar version of the SFT. One problem has been the generic non-semisimplicity of B_r (\pm n), which caused H Weyl to call it, in his work on invariants 'that enigmatic algebra'. I shall present a solution to this problem, which shows that there is a single idempotent in B_r (\pm n), which describes all the relations. The proof is through a new 'Brauer category', in which the fundamental theorems are easily formulated, and where a calculus of tangles may be used to prove these results. There are quantum analogues of the fundamental theorems which I shall also discuss. There are numerous applications in representation theory, geometry and topology. This is joint work with Ruibin Zhang.
Differential topology 101
13:10 Fri 17 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

Much of my recent research been directed at a problem in the theory of compact complex surfaces---trying to fill in a gap in the Enriques-Kodaira classification. Attempting to classify some collection of mathematical objects is a very common activity for pure mathematicians, and there are many well-known examples of successful classification schemes; for example, the classification of finite simple groups, and the classification of simply connected topological 4-manifolds. The aim of this talk will be to illustrate how techniques from differential geometry can be used to classify compact surfaces. The level of the talk will be very elementary, and the material is all very well known, but it is sometimes instructive to look back over simple cases of a general problem with the benefit of experience to gain greater insight into the more general and difficult cases.
Examples of counterexamples
13:10 Tue 4 Sep, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Pedram Hekmati :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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This aims to be an example of an exemplary talk on examples of celebrated counterexamples in mathematics. A famous example, for example, is Euler's counterexample to Fermat's conjecture in number theory.
Two classes of network structures that enable efficient information transmission
15:10 Fri 7 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Sanming Zhou :: The University of Melbourne

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What network topologies should we use in order to achieve efficient information transmission? Of course answer to this question depends on how we measure efficiency of information dissemination. If we measure it by the minimum gossiping time under the store-and-forward, all-port and full-duplex model, we show that certain Cayley graphs associated with Frobenius groups are `perfect' in a sense. (A Frobenius group is a permutation group which is transitive but not regular such that only the identity element can fix two points.) Such graphs are also optimal for all-to-all routing in the sense that the maximum load on edges achieves the minimum. In this talk we will discuss this theory of optimal network design.
Knot Theory
12:10 Mon 10 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Konrad Pilch :: University of Adelaide

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The ancient Chinese used it, the Celts had this skill in spades, it was a big skill of seafarers and pirates, and even now we need it if only to be able to wear shoes! This talk will be about Knot Theory. Knot theory has a colourful and interesting past and I will touch on the why, the what and the when of knots in mathematics. I shall also discuss the major problems concerning knots including the different methods of classification of knots, the unresolved questions about knots, and why have they even been studied. It will be a thorough immersion that will leave you knotted!
Quantisation commutes with reduction
15:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University Hannover

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The "Quantisation commutes with reduction" principle is an idea from physics, which has powerful applications in mathematics. It basically states that the ways in which symmetry can be used to simplify a physical system in classical and quantum mechanics, are compatible. This provides a strong link between the areas in mathematics used to describe symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics: symplectic geometry and representation theory, respectively. It has been proved in the 1990s that quantisation indeed commutes with reduction, under the important assumption that all spaces and symmetry groups involved are compact. This talk is an introduction to this principle and, if time permits, its mathematical relevance.
Krylov Subspace Methods or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love GMRes
12:10 Mon 17 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

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Many problems within applied mathematics require the solution of a linear system of equations. For instance, models of arterial umbilical blood flow are obtained through a finite element approximation, resulting in a linear, n x n system. For small systems the solution is (almost) trivial, but what happens when n is large? Say, n ~ 10^6? In this case matrix inversion is expensive (read: completely impractical) and we seek approximate solutions in a reasonable time. In this talk I will discuss the basic theory underlying Krylov subspace methods; a class of non-stationary iterative methods which are currently the methods-of-choice for large, sparse, linear systems. In particular I will focus on the method of Generalised Minimum RESiduals (GMRes), which is of the most popular for nonsymmetric systems. It is hoped that through this presentation I will convince you that a) solving linear systems is not necessarily trivial, and that b) my lack of any tangible results is not (entirely) a result of my own incompetence.
Electrokinetics of concentrated suspensions of spherical particles
15:10 Fri 28 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Bronwyn Bradshaw-Hajek :: University of South Australia

Electrokinetic techniques are used to gather specific information about concentrated dispersions such as electronic inks, mineral processing slurries, pharmaceutical products and biological fluids (e.g. blood). But, like most experimental techniques, intermediate quantities are measured, and consequently the method relies explicitly on theoretical modelling to extract the quantities of experimental interest. A self-consistent cell-model theory of electrokinetics can be used to determine the electrical conductivity of a dense suspension of spherical colloidal particles, and thereby determine the quantities of interest (such as the particle surface potential). The numerical predictions of this model compare well with published experimental results. High frequency asymptotic analysis of the cell-model leads to some interesting conclusions.
Supermanifolds and the moduli space of instantons
13:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Prof Ugo Bruzzo :: International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste

I will give an example of an application of supermanifold theory to physics, i.e., how to "superize" the moduli space of instantons on a 4-fold and use it to give a description of the BRST transformations, to compute the "supermeasure" of the moduli space, and the Nekrasov partition function.
The space of cubic rational maps
13:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

For each natural number d, the space of rational maps of degree d on the Riemann sphere has the structure of a complex manifold. The topology of these manifolds has been extensively studied. The recent development of Oka theory raises some new and interesting questions about their complex structure. We apply geometric invariant theory to the degree 3 case, studying a double action of the Mobius group on the space of cubic rational maps. We show that the categorical quotient is C, and that the space of cubic rational maps enjoys the holomorphic flexibility properties of strong dominability and C-connectedness.
Numerical Free Probability: Computing Eigenvalue Distributions of Algebraic Manipulations of Random Matrices
15:10 Fri 2 Nov, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sheehan Olver :: The University of Sydney

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Suppose that the global eigenvalue distributions of two large random matrices A and B are known. It is a remarkable fact that, generically, the eigenvalue distribution of A + B and (if A and B are positive definite) A*B are uniquely determined from only the eigenvalue distributions of A and B; i.e., no information about eigenvectors are required. These operations on eigenvalue distributions are described by free probability theory. We construct a numerical toolbox that can efficiently and reliably calculate these operations with spectral accuracy, by exploiting the complex analytical framework that underlies free probability theory.
Modern trends in dynamo theory
15:10 Fri 16 Nov, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Michael Proctor :: University of Cambridge

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Dynamo action is the process by which magnetic fields in astrophysical bodies (and recently, laboratory fluids) are maintained against resistive losses by Faraday induction. For many years a favoured model of this process, known as mean-field electrodynamics, has been widely used to produce tractable models. I shall present a critique of this theory and contrast it it with another dynamo process (small scale dynamo action) that does not, unlike mean-field electrodynamics, rely on broken reflection symmetry or scale separation. Finally, I shall talk about very recent rigorous results concerning the Archontis dynamo, in which the magnetic and velocity fields are closely aligned.
Twisted analytic torsion and adiabatic limits
13:10 Wed 5 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Ryan Mickler :: University of Adelaide

We review Mathai-Wu's recent extension of Ray-Singer analytic torsion to supercomplexes. We explore some new results relating these two torsions, and how we can apply the adiabatic spectral sequence due to Forman and Farber's analytic deformation theory to compute some spectral invariants of the complexes involved, answering some questions that were posed in Mathai-Wu's paper.
Hyperplane arrangements and tropicalization of linear spaces
10:10 Mon 17 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Graham Denham :: University of Western Ontario

I will give an introduction to a sequence of ideas in tropical geometry, the tropicalization of linear spaces. In the beginning, a construction due to De Concini and Procesi (wonderful models, 1995) gave a combinatorially explicit description of various iterated blowups of projective spaces along (proper transforms of) linear subspaces. A decade later, Tevelev's notion of tropical compactifications led to, in particular, a new view of the wonderful models and their intersection theory in terms of the theory of toric varieties (via work of Feichtner-Sturmfels, Feichtner-Yuzvinsky, Ardila-Klivans, and others). Recently, these ideas have played a role in Huh and Katz's proof of a long-standing conjecture in combinatorics.
Conformally Fedosov manifolds
12:10 Fri 8 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Michael Eastwood :: Australian National University

Symplectic and projective structures may be compatibly combined. The resulting structure closely resembles conformal geometry and a manifold endowed with such a structure is called conformally Fedosov. This talk will present the basic theory of conformally Fedosov geometry and, in particular, construct a Cartan connection for them. This is joint work with Jan Slovak.
Twistor theory and the harmonic hull
15:10 Fri 8 Mar, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Michael Eastwood :: Australian National University

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Harmonic functions are real-analytic and so automatically extend as functions of complex variables. But how far do they extend? This question may be answered by twistor theory, the Penrose transform, and associated conformal geometry. Nothing will be supposed about such matters: I shall base the constructions on an elementary yet mysterious formula of Bateman from 1904. This is joint work with Feng Xu.
Modular forms: a rough guide
12:10 Mon 18 Mar, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Damien Warman :: University of Adelaide

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I recently found the need to learn a little about what I had naively believed to be an abstruse branch of number theory, but which turns out to be a ubiquitous and intriguing theory. I'll introduce some of the geometry underlying the elementary theory of modular functions and modular forms. We'll look at some pictures and play with sage, time permitting.
Einstein's special relativity beyond the speed of light
14:10 Mon 18 Mar, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof. Jim Hill :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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We derive extended Lorentz transformations between inertial frames for relative velocities greater than the speed of light, and which are complementary to the Lorentz transformation giving rise to the Einstein special theory of relativity. The new transformations arise from the same mathematical framework as the Lorentz transformation, displaying singular behaviour when the relative velocity approaches the speed of light and generating the same addition law for velocities, but most importantly, do not involve the need to introduce imaginary masses or complicated physics to provide well-defined expressions.
How fast? Bounding the mixing time of combinatorial Markov chains
15:10 Fri 22 Mar, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Catherine Greenhill :: University of New South Wales

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A Markov chain is a stochastic process which is "memoryless", in that the next state of the chain depends only on the current state, and not on how it got there. It is a classical result that an ergodic Markov chain has a unique stationary distribution. However, classical theory does not provide any information on the rate of convergence to stationarity. Around 30 years ago, the mixing time of a Markov chain was introduced to measure the number of steps required before the distribution of the chain is within some small distance of the stationary distribution. One reason why this is important is that researchers in areas such as physics and biology use Markov chains to sample from large sets of interest. Rigorous bounds on the mixing time of their chain allows these researchers to have confidence in their results. Bounding the mixing time of combinatorial Markov chains can be a challenge, and there are only a few approaches available. I will discuss the main methods and give examples for each (with pretty pictures).
Gauge groupoid cocycles and Cheeger-Simons differential characters
13:10 Fri 5 Apr, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Jouko Mickelsson :: Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Groups of gauge transformations in quantum field theory are typically extended by a 2-cocycle with values in a certain abelian group due to chiral symmetry breaking. For these extensions there exist a global explicit construction since the 1980's. I shall study the higher group cocycles following a recent paper by F. Wagemann and C. Wockel, but extending to the transformation groupoid setting (motivated by QFT) and discussing potential obstructions in the construction due to a nonvanishing of low dimensional homology groups of the gauge group. The resolution of the obstruction is obtained by an application of the Cheeger-Simons differential characters.
A stability theorem for elliptic Harnack inequalities
15:10 Fri 5 Apr, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Richard Bass :: University of Connecticut

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Harnack inequalities are an important tool in probability theory, analysis, and partial differential equations. The classical Harnack inequality is just the one you learned in your graduate complex analysis class, but there have been many extensions, to different spaces, such as manifolds, fractals, infinite graphs, and to various sorts of elliptic operators. A landmark result was that of Moser in 1961, where he proved the Harnack inequality for solutions to a class of partial differential equations. I will talk about the stability of Harnack inequalities. The main result says that if the Harnack inequality holds for an operator on a space, then the Harnack inequality will also hold for a large class of other operators on that same space. This provides a generalization of the result of Moser.
The Mathematics of Secrets
14:10 Mon 8 Apr, 2013 :: 210 Napier Building :: Dr Naomi Benger :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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One very important application of number theory is the implementation of public key cryptosystems that we use today. I will introduce elementary number theory, Fermat's theorem and use these to explain how ElGamal encryption and digital signatures work.
M-theory and higher gauge theory
13:10 Fri 12 Apr, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Dr Christian Saemann :: Heriot-Watt University

I will review my recent work on integrability of M-brane configurations and the description of M-brane models in higher gauge theory. In particular, I will discuss categorified analogues of instantons and present superconformal equations of motion for the non-abelian tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The latter are derived from considering non-abelian gerbes on certain twistor spaces.
A glimpse at the Langlands program
15:10 Fri 12 Apr, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Masoud Kamgarpour :: University of Queensland

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Abstract: In the late 1960s, Robert Langlands made a series of surprising conjectures relating fundamental concepts from number theory, representation theory, and algebraic geometry. Langlands' conjectures soon developed into a high-profile international research program known as the Langlands program. Many fundamental problems, including the Shimura-Taniyama-Weil conjecture (partially settled by Andrew Wiles in his proof of the Fermat's Last Theorem), are particular cases of the Langlands program. In this talk, I will discuss some of the motivation and results in this program.
What in the world is a chebfun?
12:10 Mon 15 Apr, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

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Good question. Many functions encountered in practice can be well-approximated by a linear combination of Chebyshev polynomials, which then allows the use of some powerful numerical techniques. I will give a very brief overview of the theory behind some of these methods, demonstrate how they may be implemented using the MATLAB package known as Chebfun, and answer the question posed in the title along the way. No knowledge of approximation theory or MATLAB is required, however, you will need to accept the transliteration "Chebyshev".
The boundary conditions for macroscale modelling of a discrete diffusion system with periodic diffusivity
12:10 Mon 29 Apr, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Chen Chen :: University of Adelaide

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Many mathematical and engineering problems have a multiscale nature. There are a vast of theories supporting multiscale modelling on infinite domain, such as homogenization theory and centre manifold theory. To date, there are little consideration of the correct boundary conditions to be used at the edge of macroscale model. In this seminar, I will present how to derive macroscale boundary conditions for the diffusion system.
Filtering Theory in Modelling the Electricity Market
12:10 Mon 6 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

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In mathematical finance, as in many other fields where applied mathematics is a powerful tool, we assume that a model is good enough when it captures different sources of randomness affecting the quantity of interests, which in this case is the electricity prices. The power market is very different from other markets in terms of the randomness sources that can be observed in the prices feature and evolution. We start from suggesting a new model that simulates the electricity prices, this new model is constructed by adding a periodicity term, a jumps terms and a positives mean reverting term. The later term is driven by a non-observable Markov process. So in order to prices some financial product, we have to use some of the filtering theory to deal with the non-observable process, these techniques are gaining very much of interest from practitioners and researchers in the field of financial mathematics.
Neuronal excitability and canards
15:10 Fri 10 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Martin Wechselberger :: University of Sydney

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The notion of excitability was first introduced in an attempt to understand firing properties of neurons. It was Alan Hodgkin who identified three basic types (classes) of excitable axons (integrator, resonator and differentiator) distinguished by their different responses to injected steps of currents of various amplitudes. Pioneered by Rinzel and Ermentrout, bifurcation theory explains repetitive (tonic) firing patterns for adequate steady inputs in integrator (type I) and resonator (type II) neuronal models. In contrast, the dynamic behavior of differentiator (type III) neurons cannot be explained by standard dynamical systems theory. This third type of excitable neuron encodes a dynamic change in the input and leads naturally to a transient response of the neuron. In this talk, I will show that "canards" - peculiar mathematical creatures - are well suited to explain the nature of transient responses of neurons due to dynamic (smooth) inputs. I will apply this geometric theory to a simple driven FitzHugh-Nagumo/Morris-Lecar type neural model and to a more complicated neural model that describes paradoxical excitation due to propofol anesthesia.
Colour
12:10 Mon 13 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Lyron Winderbaum :: University of Adelaide

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Colour is a powerful tool in presenting data, but it can be tricky to choose just the right colours to represent your data honestly - do the colours used in your heatmap overemphasise the differences between particular values over others? does your choice of colours overemphasize one when they should be represented as equal? etc. All these questions are fundamentally based in how we perceive colour. There has been alot of research into how we perceive colour in the past century, and some interesting results. I will explain how a `standard observer' was found empirically and used to develop an absolute reference standard for colour in 1931. How although the common Red-Green-Blue representation of colour is useful and intuitive, distances between colours in this space do not reflect our perception of difference between colours and how alternative, perceptually focused colourspaces where introduced in 1976. I will go on to explain how these results can be used to provide simple mechanisms by which to choose colours that satisfy particular properties such as being equally different from each other, or being linearly more different in sequence, or maintaining such properties when transferred to greyscale, or for a colourblind person.
Crystallographic groups I: the classical theory
12:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A discrete isometry group acting properly discontinuously on the n-dimensional Euclidean space with compact quotient is called a crystallographic group. This name reflects the fact that in dimension n=3 their compact fundamental domains resemble a space-filling crystal pattern. For higher dimensions, Hilbert posed his famous 18th problem: "Is there in n-dimensional Euclidean space only a finite number of essentially different kinds of groups of motions with a [compact] fundamental region?" This problem was solved by Bieberbach when he proved that in every dimension n there exists only a finite number of isomorphic crystallographic groups and also gave a description of these groups. From the perspective of differential geometry these results are of major importance, as crystallographic groups are precisely the fundamental groups of compact flat Riemannian orbifolds. The quotient is even a manifold if the fundamental group is required to be torsion-free, in which case it is called a Bieberbach group. Moreover, for a flat manifold the fundamental group completely determines the holonomy group. In this talk I will discuss the properties of crystallographic groups, study examples in dimension n=2 and n=3, and present the three Bieberbach theorems on the structure of crystallographic groups.
Crystallographic groups II: generalisations
12:10 Fri 24 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

The theory of crystallographic groups acting cocompactly on Euclidean space can be extended and generalised in many different ways. For example, instead of studying discrete groups of Euclidean isometries, one can consider groups of isometries for indefinite inner products. These are the fundamental groups of compact flat pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. Still more generally, one might study group of affine transformation on n-space that are not required to preserve any bilinear form. Also, the condition of cocompactness can be dropped. In this talk, I will present some of the results obtained for these generalisations, and also discuss some of my own work on flat homogeneous pseudo-Riemannian spaces.
Invariant Theory: The 19th Century and Beyond
15:10 Fri 21 Jun, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Jarod Alper :: Australian National University

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A central theme in 19th century mathematics was invariant theory, which was viewed as a bridge between geometry and algebra. David Hilbert revolutionized the field with two seminal papers in 1890 and 1893 with techniques such as Hilbert's basis theorem, Hilbert's Nullstellensatz and Hilbert's syzygy theorem that spawned the modern field of commutative algebra. After Hilbert's groundbreaking work, the field of invariant theory remained largely inactive until the 1960's when David Mumford revitalized the field by reinterpreting Hilbert's ideas in the context of algebraic geometry which ultimately led to the influential construction of the moduli space of smooth curves. Today invariant theory remains a vital research area with connections to various mathematical disciplines: representation theory, algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, combinatorics and nonlinear differential operators. The goal of this talk is to provide an introduction to invariant theory with an emphasis on Hilbert's and Mumford's contributions. Time permitting, I will explain recent research with Maksym Fedorchuk and David Smyth which exploits the ideas of Hilbert, Mumford as well as Kempf to answer a classical question concerning the stability of algebraic curves.
IGA/AMSI Workshop: Representation theory and operator algebras
10:00 Mon 1 Jul, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

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This interdisciplinary workshop will be about aspects of representation theory (in the sense of Harish-Chandra), aspects of noncommutative geometry (in the sense of Alain Connes) and aspects of operator K-theory (in the sense of Gennadi Kasparov). It features the renowned speaker, Professor Nigel Higson (Penn State University) http://www.iga.adelaide.edu.au/workshops/WorkshopJuly2013/ All are welcome.
K-homology and the quantization commutes with reduction problem
12:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

The quantization commutes with reduction problem for Hamiltonian actions of compact Lie groups was solved by Meinrenken in the mid-1990s using geometric techniques, and solved again shortly afterwards by Tian and Zhang using analytic methods. In this talk I shall outline some of the close links that exist between the problem, the two solutions, and the geometric and analytic versions of K-homology theory that are studied in noncommutative geometry. I shall try to make the case for K-homology as a useful conceptual framework for the solutions and (at least some of) their various generalizations.
Quantization, Representations and the Orbit Philosophy
15:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

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This talk will be about the mathematics of quantization and about representation theory, where the concept of quantization seems to be especially relevant. It was discovered by Kirillov in the 1960's that the representation theory of nilpotent Lie groups (such as the group that encodes Heisenberg's commutation relations) can be beautifully and efficiently described using a vocabulary drawn from geometry and quantum mechanics. The description was soon adapted to other classes of Lie groups, and the expectation that it ought to apply almost universally has come to be called the "orbit philosophy." But despite early successes, the orbit philosophy is in a decidedly unfinished state. I'll try to explain some of the issues and some possible new directions.
The search for the exotic - subfactors and conformal field theory
13:10 Fri 26 Jul, 2013 :: Engineering-Maths 212 :: Prof David E. Evans :: Cardiff University

Subfactor theory provides a framework for studying modular invariant partition functions in conformal field theory, and candidates for exotic modular tensor categories. I will describe work with Terry Gannon on the search for exotic theories beyond those from symmetries based on loop groups, Wess-Zumino-Witten models and finite groups.
Subfactors and twisted equivariant K-theory
12:10 Fri 2 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof David E. Evans :: Cardiff University

The most basic structure of chiral conformal field theory (CFT) is the Verlinde ring. Freed-Hopkins-Teleman have expressed the Verlinde ring for the CFTs associated to loop groups as twisted equivariant K-theory. In joint work with Terry Gannon, we build on their work to express K-theoretically the structures of full CFT. In particular, the modular invariant partition functions (which essentially parametrise the possible full CFTs) have a rich interpretation within von Neumann algebras (subfactors), which has led to the developments of structures of full CFT such as the full system (fusion ring of defect lines), nimrep (cylindrical partition function), alpha-induction etc.
Symplectic Lie groups
12:10 Fri 9 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A "symplectic Lie group" is a Lie group G with a symplectic form such that G acts by symplectic transformations on itself. Such a G cannot be semisimple, so the research focuses on solvable symplectic Lie groups. In the compact case, a classification of these groups is known. In many cases, a solvable symplectic Lie group G is a cotangent bundle of a flat Lie group H. Then H is a Lagrange subgroup of G, meaning its Lie algebra h is isotropic in the Lie algebra g of G. The existence of Lagrange subalgebras or ideals in g is an important question which relates to many problems in the general structure theory of symplectic Lie groups. In my talk, I will give a brief overview of the known results in this field, ranging from the 1970s to a very recent structure theory.
A survey of non-abelian cohomology
12:10 Fri 16 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Adelaide

If G is a topological group, not necessarily abelian, then the set H^1(M,G) has a natural interpretation in terms of principal G-bundles on the space M. In this talk I will describe higher degree analogs of both the set H^1(M,G) and the notion of a principal bundle (the latter is closely connected to the subject of bundle gerbes). I will explain, following work of Joyal, Jardine and many others, how the language of abstract homotopy theory gives a very convenient framework for discussing these ideas.
The Einstein equations with torsion, reduction and duality
12:10 Fri 23 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

We consider the Einstein equations for connections with skew torsion. After some general remarks we look at these equations on principal G-bundles, making contact with string structures and heterotic string theory in the process. When G is a torus the equations are shown to possess a symmetry not shared by the usual Einstein equations - T-duality. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati.
The Lowenheim-Skolem theorem
12:10 Mon 26 Aug, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: William Crawford :: University of Adelaide

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For those of us who didn't do an undergrad course in logic, the foundations of set theory are pretty daunting. I will give a run down of some of the basics and then talk about a lesser known, but interesting result; the Lowenheim-Skolem theorem. One of the consequences of the theorem is that a set can be countable in one model of set theory, while being uncountable in another.
What are fusion categories?
12:10 Fri 6 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

Fusion categories are a common generalization of finite groups and quantum groups at roots of unity. I'll explain a little of their structure, mention their applications (to topological field theory and quantum computing), and then explore the ways in which they are in general similar to, or different from, the 'classical' cases. We've only just started exploring, and don't yet know what the exotic examples we've discovered signify about the landscape ahead.
K-theory and solid state physics
12:10 Fri 13 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Keith Hannabuss :: Balliol College, Oxford

More than 50 years ago Dyson showed that there is a nine-fold classification of random matrix models, the classes of which are each associated with Riemannian symmetric spaces. More recently it was realised that a related argument enables one to classify the insulating properties of fermionic systems (with the addition of an extra class to give 10 in all), and can be described using K-theory. In this talk I shall give a survey of the ideas, and a brief outline of work with Guo Chuan Thiang.
The logarithmic singularities of the Green functions of the conformal powers of the Laplacian
11:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

Green functions play an important role in conformal geometry. In this talk, we shall explain how to compute explicitly the logarithmic singularities of the Green functions of the conformal powers of the Laplacian. These operators are the Yamabe and Paneitz operators, as well as the conformal fractional powers of the Laplacian arising from scattering theory for Poincare-Einstein metrics. The results are formulated in terms of Weyl conformal invariants defined via the ambient metric of Fefferman-Graham.
Symmetry gaps for geometric structures
15:10 Fri 20 Sep, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dennis The :: Australian National University

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Klein's Erlangen program classified geometries based on their (transitive) groups of symmetries, e.g. Euclidean geometry is the quotient of the rigid motion group by the subgroup of rotations. While this perspective is homogeneous, Riemann's generalization of Euclidean geometry is in general very "lumpy" - i.e. there exist Riemannian manifolds that have no symmetries at all. A common generalization where a group still plays a dominant role is Cartan geometry, which first arose in Cartan's solution to the equivalence problem for geometric structures, and which articulates what a "curved version" of a flat (homogeneous) model means. Parabolic geometries are Cartan geometries modelled on (generalized) flag varieties (e.g. projective space, isotropic Grassmannians) which are well-known objects from the representation theory of semisimple Lie groups. These curved versions encompass a zoo of interesting geometries, including conformal, projective, CR, systems of 2nd order ODE, etc. This interaction between differential geometry and representation theory has proved extremely fruitful in recent years. My talk will be an example-based tour of various types of parabolic geometries, which I'll use to outline some of the main aspects of the theory (suppressing technical details). The main thread throughout the talk will be the symmetry gap problem: For a given type of Cartan geometry, the maximal symmetry dimension is realized by the flat model, but what is the next possible ("submaximal") symmetry dimension? I'll sketch a recent solution (in joint work with Boris Kruglikov) for a wide class of parabolic geometries which gives a combinatorial recipe for reading the submaximal symmetry dimension from a Dynkin diagram.
The irrational line on the torus
12:35 Mon 23 Sep, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kelli Francis-Staite :: University of Adelaide

The torus is very common example of a surface in R^3, but it's a lot more interesting than just a donut! I will introduce some standard mathematical descriptions of the torus, a bit of number theory, and finally what the irrational line on the torus is. Why is this interesting? Well despite donuts being yummy to eat, the irrational line on the torus gives a range of pathological counter-examples. In Differential Geometry, it is an example of a manifold that is a subset of another manifold, but not a submanifold. In Lie theory, it is an example of a subgroup of a Lie group which is not a Lie subgroup. If that wasn't enough of a mouthful, I may also provide some sweet incentives to come along! Does anyone know the location of a good donut store?
Dynamics and the geometry of numbers
14:10 Fri 27 Sep, 2013 :: Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre :: Prof Akshay Venkatesh :: Stanford University

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It was understood by Minkowski that one could prove interesting results in number theory by considering the geometry of lattices in R^n. (A lattice is simply a grid of points.) This technique is called the "geometry of numbers." We now understand much more about analysis and dynamics on the space of all lattices, and this has led to a deeper understanding of classical questions. I will review some of these ideas, with emphasis on the dynamical aspects.
Modelling and optimisation of group dose-response challenge experiments
12:10 Mon 28 Oct, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Price :: University of Adelaide

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An important component of scientific research is the 'experiment'. Effective design of these experiments is important and, accordingly, has received significant attention under the heading 'optimal experimental design'. However, until recently, little work has been done on optimal experimental design for experiments where the underlying process can be modelled by a Markov chain. In this talk, I will discuss some of the work that has been done in the field of optimal experimental design for Markov Chains, and some of the work that I have done in applying this theory to dose-response challenge experiments for the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni in chickens.
The geometry of rolling surfaces and non-holonomic mechanics
15:10 Fri 1 Nov, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Robert Bryant :: Duke University

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In mechanics, the system of a sphere rolling over a plane without slipping or twisting is a fundamental example of what is called a non-holonomic mechanical system, the study of which belongs to the subject of control theory. The more general case of one surface rolling over another without slipping or twisting is, similarly, of great interest for both practical and theoretical reasons. In this talk, which is intended for a general mathematical audience (i.e., no familiarity with control theory or differential geometry will be assumed), I will describe some of the basic features of this problem, a bit of its history, and some of the surprising developments that its study reveals, such as the unexpected appearance of the exceptional group G_2.
Braids and entropy
10:10 Fri 8 Nov, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Burglind Joricke :: Australian National University

This talk will be a brief introduction to some aspects of braid theory and to entropy, to provide background for the speaker's talk at 12:10 pm the same day.
Braids, conformal module and entropy
12:10 Fri 8 Nov, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Burglind Joricke :: Australian National University

I will discuss two invariants of conjugacy classes of braids. The first invariant is the conformal module which implicitly occurred already in a paper of Gorin and Lin in connection with their interest in Hilbert's 13th problem. The second is a popular dynamical invariant, the entropy. It appeared in connection with Thurston's theory of surface homeomorphisms. It turns out that these invariants are related: They are inversely proportional. In a preparatory talk (at 10:10 am) I will give a brief introduction to some aspects of braid theory and to entropy.
A few flavours of optimal control of Markov chains
11:00 Thu 12 Dec, 2013 :: B18 :: Dr Sam Cohen :: Oxford University

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In this talk we will outline a general view of optimal control of a continuous-time Markov chain, and how this naturally leads to the theory of Backward Stochastic Differential Equations. We will see how this class of equations gives a natural setting to study these problems, and how we can calculate numerical solutions in many settings. These will include problems with payoffs with memory, with random terminal times, with ergodic and infinite-horizon value functions, and with finite and infinitely many states. Examples will be drawn from finance, networks and electronic engineering.
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
12:10 Fri 7 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

Geometric quantisation is a way to construct quantum mechanical phase spaces (Hilbert spaces) from classical mechanical phase spaces (symplectic manifolds). In the presence of a group action, the quantisation commutes with reduction principle states that geometric quantisation should be compatible with the ways the group action can be used to simplify (reduce) the classical and quantum phase spaces. This has deep consequences for the link between symplectic geometry and representation theory. The quantisation commutes with reduction principle has been given explicit meaning, and been proved, in cases where the symplectic manifold and the group acting on it are compact. There have also been results where just the group, or the orbit space of the action, is assumed to be compact. These are important and difficult, but it is somewhat frustrating that they do not even apply to the simplest example from the physics point of view: a free particle in Rn. This talk is about a joint result with Mathai Varghese where the group, manifold and orbit space may all be noncompact.
Embed to homogenise heterogeneous wave equation.
12:35 Mon 17 Mar, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Chen Chen :: University of Adelaide

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Consider materials with complicated microstructure: we want to model their large scale dynamics by equations with effective, `average' coefficients. I will show an example of heterogeneous wave equation in 1D. If Centre manifold theory is applied to model the original heterogeneous wave equation directly, we will get a trivial model. I embed the wave equation into a family of more complex wave problems and I show the equivalence of the two sets of solutions.
Viscoelastic fluids: mathematical challenges in determining their relaxation spectra
15:10 Mon 17 Mar, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Russell Davies :: Cardiff University

Determining the relaxation spectrum of a viscoelastic fluid is a crucial step before a linear or nonlinear constitutive model can be applied. Information about the relaxation spectrum is obtained from simple flow experiments such as creep or oscillatory shear. However, the determination process involves the solution of one or more highly ill-posed inverse problems. The availability of only discrete data, the presence of noise in the data, as well as incomplete data, collectively make the problem very hard to solve. In this talk I will illustrate the mathematical challenges inherent in determining relaxation spectra, and also introduce the method of wavelet regularization which enables the representation of a continuous relaxation spectrum by a set of hyperbolic scaling functions.
Scattering theory and noncommutative geometry
01:10 Mon 31 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Alan Carey :: Australian National University

Semiclassical restriction estimates
12:10 Fri 4 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Melissa Tacy :: University of Adelaide

Eigenfunctions of Hamiltonians arise naturally in the theory of quantum mechanics as stationary states of quantum systems. Their eigenvalues have an interpretation as the square root of E, where E is the energy of the system. We wish to better understand the high energy limit which defines the boundary between quantum and classical mechanics. In this talk I will focus on results regarding the restriction of eigenfunctions to lower dimensional subspaces, in particular to hypersurfaces. A convenient way to study such problems is to reframe them as problems in semiclassical analysis.
T-Duality and its Generalizations
12:10 Fri 11 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Jarah Evslin :: Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, CAS

Given a manifold M with a torus action and a choice of integral 3-cocycle H, T-duality yields another manifold with a torus action and integral 3-cocyle. It induces a number of surprising automorphisms between structures on these manifolds. In this talk I will review T-duality and describe some work on two generalizations which are realized in string theory: NS5-branes and heterotic strings. These respectively correspond to non-closed 3-classes H and to principal bundles fibered over M.
A generalised Kac-Peterson cocycle
11:10 Thu 17 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

The Kac-Peterson cocycle appears in the study of highest weight modules of infinite dimensional Lie algebras and determines a central extension. The vanishing of its cohomology class is tied to the existence of a cubic Dirac operator whose square is a quadratic Casimir element. I will introduce a closely related Lie algebra cocycle that comes about when constructing spin representations and gives rise to a Banach Lie group with a highly nontrivial topology. I will also explain how to make sense of the cubic Dirac operator in this setting and discuss its relation to twisted K-theory. This is joint work with Jouko Mickelsson.
Lefschetz fixed point theorem and beyond
12:10 Fri 2 May, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

A Lefschetz number associated to a continuous map on a closed manifold is a topological invariant determined by the geometric information near the neighbourhood of fixed point set of the map. After an introduction of the Lefschetz fixed point theorem, we shall use the Dirac-dual Dirac method to derive the Lefschetz number on K-theory level. The method concerns the comparison of the Dirac operator on the manifold and the Dirac operator on some submanifold. This method can be generalised to several interesting situations when the manifold is not necessarily compact.
A geometric model for odd differential K-theory
12:10 Fri 9 May, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

Odd K-theory has the interesting property that-unlike even K-theory-it admits an infinite number of inequivalent differential refinements. In this talk I will give a description of odd differential K-theory using infinite rank bundles and explain why it is the correct differential refinement. This is joint work with Michael Murray, Pedram Hekmati and Vincent Schlegel.
Computing with groups
15:10 Fri 30 May, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Heiko Dietrich :: Monash University

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Groups are algebraic structures which show up in many branches of mathematics and other areas of science; Computational Group Theory is on the cutting edge of pure research in group theory and its interplay with computational methods. In this talk, we consider a practical aspect of Computational Group Theory: how to represent a group in a computer, and how to work with such a description efficiently. We will first recall some well-established methods for permutation group; we will then discuss some recent progress for matrix groups.
Not nots, knots.
12:10 Mon 16 Jun, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Luke Keating-Hughes :: University of Adelaide

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Although knot theory does not ordinarily arise in classical mathematics, the study of knots themselves proves to be very intricate and is certainly an area with promise for new developments. Ultimately, the study of knots boils down to problems of classification and when two knots are seen to be 'equivalent'. In this seminar we will first talk about some basic definitions and properties of knots, then move on to calculating the knot polynomial - a powerful invariant on knots.
Fast computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions on bounded plane domains
15:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

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I will describe a new method for numerically computing eigenfunctions and eigenvalues on certain plane domains, derived from the so-called "scaling method" of Vergini and Saraceno. It is based on properties of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map on the domain, which relates a function f on the boundary of the domain to the normal derivative (at the boundary) of the eigenfunction with boundary data f. This is a topic of independent interest in pure mathematics. In my talk I will try to emphasize the inteplay between theory and applications, which is very rich in this situation. This is joint work with numerical analyst Alex Barnett (Dartmouth).
Hydrodynamics and rheology of self-propelled colloids
15:10 Fri 8 Aug, 2014 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sarthok Sircar :: University of Adelaide

The sub-cellular world has many components in common with soft condensed matter systems (polymers, colloids and liquid crystals). But it has novel properties, not present in traditional complex fluids, arising from a rich spectrum of non-equilibrium behavior: flocking, chemotaxis and bioconvection. The talk is divided into two parts. In the first half, we will (get an idea on how to) derive a hydrodynamic model for self-propelled particles of an arbitrary shape from first principles, in a sufficiently dilute suspension limit, moving in a 3-dimensional space inside a viscous solvent. The model is then restricted to particles with ellipsoidal geometry to quantify the interplay of the long-range excluded volume and the short-range self-propulsion effects. The expression for the constitutive stresses, relating the kinetic theory with the momentum transport equations, are derived using a combination of the virtual work principle (for extra elastic stresses) and symmetry arguments (for active stresses). The second half of the talk will highlight on my current numerical expertise. In particular we will exploit a specific class of spectral basis functions together with RK4 time-stepping to determine the dynamical phases/structures as well as phase-transitions of these ellipsoidal clusters. We will also discuss on how to define the order (or orientation) of these clusters and understand the other rheological quantities.
Quasimodes that do not Equidistribute
13:10 Tue 19 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Shimon Brooks :: Bar-Ilan University

The QUE Conjecture of Rudnick-Sarnak asserts that eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on Riemannian manifolds of negative curvature should equidistribute in the large eigenvalue limit. For a number of reasons, it is expected that this property may be related to the (conjectured) small multiplicities in the spectrum. One way to study this relationship is to ask about equidistribution for "quasimodes"-or approximate eigenfunctions- in place of highly-degenerate eigenspaces. We will discuss the case of surfaces of constant negative curvature; in particular, we will explain how to construct some examples of sufficiently weak quasimodes that do not satisfy QUE, and show how they fit into the larger theory.
Software and protocol verification using Alloy
12:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dinesha Ranathunga :: University of Adelaide

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Reliable software isn't achieved by trial and error. It requires tools to support verification. Alloy is a tool based on set theory that allows expression of a logic-based model of software or a protocol, and hence allows checking of this model. In this talk, I will cover its key concepts, language syntax and analysis features.
A Random Walk Through Discrete State Markov Chain Theory
12:10 Mon 22 Sep, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: James Walker :: University of Adelaide

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This talk will go through the basics of Markov chain theory; including how to construct a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC), how to adapt a Markov chain to include non-memoryless distributions, how to simulate CTMC's and some key results.
To Complex Analysis... and beyond!
12:10 Mon 29 Sep, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Brett Chenoweth :: University of Adelaide

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In the undergraduate complex analysis course students learn about complex valued functions on domains in C (the complex plane). Several interesting and surprising results come about from this study. In my talk I will introduce a more general setting where complex analysis can be done, namely Riemann surfaces (complex manifolds of dimension 1). I will then prove that all non-compact Riemann surfaces are Stein; which loosely speaking means that their function theory is similar to that of C.
Optimally Chosen Quadratic Forms for Partitioning Multivariate Data
13:10 Tue 14 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Assoc. Prof. Inge Koch :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Quadratic forms are commonly used in linear algebra. For d-dimensional vectors they have a matrix representation, Q(x) = x'Ax, for some symmetric matrix A. In statistics quadratic forms are defined for d-dimensional random vectors, and one of the best-known quadratic forms is the Mahalanobis distance of two random vectors. In this talk we want to partition a quadratic form Q(X) = X'MX, where X is a random vector, and M a symmetric matrix, that is, we want to find a d-dimensional random vector W such that Q(X) = W'W. This problem has many solutions. We are interested in a solution or partition W of X such that pairs of corresponding variables (X_j, W_j) are highly correlated and such that W is simpler than the given X. We will consider some natural candidates for W which turn out to be suboptimal in the sense of the above constraints, and we will then exhibit the optimal solution. Solutions of this type are useful in the well-known T-square statistic. We will see in examples what these solutions look like.
Geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory to study travelling waves in: 1) a model for tumor invasion; and 2) a model for wound healing angiogenesis.
15:10 Fri 17 Oct, 2014 :: EM 218 Engineering & Mathematics Building :: Dr Petrus (Peter) van Heijster :: QUT

In this talk, I will present results on the existence of smooth and shock-like travelling wave solutions for two advection-reaction-diffusion models. The first model describes malignant tumour (i.e. skin cancer) invasion, while the second one is a model for wound healing angiogenesis. Numerical solutions indicate that both smooth and shock-fronted travelling wave solutions exist for these two models. I will verify the existence of both type of these solutions using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory. Moreover, I will provide numerical results on the stability of the waves and the actual observed wave speeds. This is joint work with K. Harley, G. Pettet, R. Marangell and M. Wechselberger.
The Serre-Grothendieck theorem by geometric means
12:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

The Serre-Grothendieck theorem implies that every torsion integral 3rd cohomology class on a finite CW-complex is the invariant of some projective bundle. It was originally proved in a letter by Serre, used homotopical methods, most notably a Postnikov decomposition of a certain classifying space with divisible homotopy groups. In this talk I will outline, using work of the algebraic geometer Offer Gabber, a proof for compact smooth manifolds using geometric means and a little K-theory.
Happiness and social information flow: Computational social science through data.
15:10 Fri 7 Nov, 2014 :: EM G06 (Engineering & Maths Bldg) :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: University of Adelaide

The recent explosion in big data coming from online social networks has led to an increasing interest in bringing quantitative methods to bear on questions in social science. A recent high-profile example is the study of emotional contagion, which has led to significant challenges and controversy. This talk will focus on two issues related to emotional contagion, namely remote-sensing of population-level wellbeing and the problem of information flow across a social network. We discuss some of the challenges in working with massive online data sets, and present a simple tool for measuring large-scale happiness from such data. By combining over 10 million geolocated messages collected from Twitter with traditional census data we uncover geographies of happiness at the scale of states and cities, and discuss how these patterns may be related to traditional wellbeing measures and public health outcomes. Using tools from information theory we also study information flow between individuals and how this may relate to the concept of predictability for human behaviour.
Happiness and social information flow: Computational social science through data.
15:10 Fri 7 Nov, 2014 :: EM G06 (Engineering & Maths Bldg) :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: University of Adelaide

The recent explosion in big data coming from online social networks has led to an increasing interest in bringing quantitative methods to bear on questions in social science. A recent high-profile example is the study of emotional contagion, which has led to significant challenges and controversy. This talk will focus on two issues related to emotional contagion, namely remote-sensing of population-level wellbeing and the problem of information flow across a social network. We discuss some of the challenges in working with massive online data sets, and present a simple tool for measuring large-scale happiness from such data. By combining over 10 million geolocated messages collected from Twitter with traditional census data we uncover geographies of happiness at the scale of states and cities, and discuss how these patterns may be related to traditional wellbeing measures and public health outcomes. Using tools from information theory we also study information flow between individuals and how this may relate to the concept of predictability for human behaviour.
Factorisations of Distributive Laws
12:10 Fri 19 Dec, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Paul Slevin :: University of Glasgow

Recently, distributive laws have been used by Boehm and Stefan to construct new examples of duplicial (paracyclic) objects, and hence cyclic homology theories. The paradigmatic example of such a theory is the cyclic homology HC(A) of an associative algebra A. It was observed by Kustermans, Murphy, and Tuset that the functor HC can be twisted by automorphisms of A. It turns out that this twisting procedure can be applied to any duplicial object defined by a distributive law. I will begin by defining duplicial objects and cyclic homology, as well as discussing some categorical concepts, then describe the construction of Boehm and Stefan. I will then define the category of factorisations of a distributive law and explain how this acts on their construction, and give some examples, making explicit how the action of this category generalises the twisting of an associative algebra.
Nonlinear analysis over infinite dimensional spaces and its applications
12:10 Fri 6 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Tsuyoshi Kato :: Kyoto University

In this talk we develop moduli theory of holomorphic curves over infinite dimensional manifolds consisted by sequences of almost Kaehler manifolds. Under the assumption of high symmetry, we verify that many mechanisms of the standard moduli theory over closed symplectic manifolds also work over these infinite dimensional spaces. As an application, we study deformation theory of discrete groups acting on trees. There is a canonical way, up to conjugacy to embed such groups into the automorphism group over the infinite projective space. We verify that for some class of Hamiltonian functions, the deformed groups must be always asymptotically infinite.
Symmetric groups via categorical representation theory
15:10 Fri 20 Mar, 2015 :: Engineering North N132 :: Dr Oded Yacobi :: University of Sydney

The symmetric groups play a fundamental role in representation theory and, while their characteristic zero representations are well understood, over fields of positive characteristic most foundational questions are still unanswered. In the 1990's Kleshchev made a spectacular breakthrough, and computed certain modular restriction multiplicities. It was observed by Lascoux, Leclerc, and Thibon that Kleshchev's numerology encodes a seemingly unrelated object: the crystal graph associated to an affine Lie algebra! We will explain how this mysterious connection opens the door to categorical representation theory, and, moreover, how the categorical perspective allows one to prove new theorems about representations of symmetric groups. We will also discuss other problems/applications in the landscape of categorical representation theory.
Topological matter and its K-theory
11:10 Thu 2 Apr, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: University of Adelaide

The notion of fundamental particles, as well as phases of condensed matter, evolves as new mathematical tools become available to the physicist. I will explain how K-theory provides a powerful language for describing quantum mechanical symmetries, homotopies of their realisations, and topological insulators. Real K-theory is crucial in this framework, and its rich structure is still being explored both physically and mathematically.
Higher rank discrete Nahm equations for SU(N) monopoles in hyperbolic space
11:10 Wed 8 Apr, 2015 :: Engineering & Maths EM213 :: Joseph Chan :: University of Melbourne

Braam and Austin in 1990, proved that SU(2) magnetic monopoles in hyperbolic space H^3 are the same as solutions of the discrete Nahm equations. I apply equivariant K-theory to the ADHM construction of instantons/holomorphic bundles to extend the Braam-Austin result from SU(2) to SU(N). During its evolution, the matrices of the higher rank discrete Nahm equations jump in dimensions and this behaviour has not been observed in discrete evolution equations before. A secondary result is that the monopole field at the boundary of H^3 determines the monopole.
IGA Workshop on Symmetries and Spinors: Interactions Between Geometry and Physics
09:30 Mon 13 Apr, 2015 :: Conference Room 7.15 on Level 7 of the Ingkarni Wardli building :: J. Figueroa-O'Farrill (University of Edinburgh), M. Zabzine (Uppsala University), et al

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The interplay between physics and geometry has lead to stunning advances and enriched the internal structure of each field. This is vividly exemplified in the theory of supergravity, which is a supersymmetric extension of Einstein's relativity theory to the small scales governed by the laws of quantum physics. Sophisticated mathematics is being employed for finding solutions to the generalised Einstein equations and in return, they provide a rich source for new exotic geometries. This workshop brings together world-leading scientists from both, geometry and mathematical physics, as well as young researchers and students, to meet and learn about each others work.
Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case
12:10 Fri 1 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Spherical T-duality is related to M-theory and was introduced in recent joint work with Bouwknegt and Evslin. I will begin by briefly reviewing the case of principal SU(2)-bundles with degree 7 flux, and then focus on the non-principal case for most of the talk, ending with the relation to SUGRA/M-theory.
Big things are weird
12:10 Mon 25 May, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Luke Keating-Hughes :: University of Adelaide

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The pyramids of Giza, the depths of the Mariana trench, the massive Einstein Cross Quasar; all of these things are big and weird. Big weird things aren't just apparent in the physical world though, they appear in mathematics too! In this talk I will try to motivate a mathematical big thing and then show that it is weird. In particular, we will introduce the necessary topology and homotopy theory in order to show that although all finite dimensional spheres are (almost canonically) non-contractible spaces - an infinite dimensional sphere IS contractible! This result's significance will then be explained in the context of Kuiper's Theorem if time permits.
Monodromy of the Hitchin system and components of representation varieties
12:10 Fri 29 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

Representations of the fundamental group of a compact Riemann surface into a reductive Lie group form a moduli space, called a representation variety. An outstanding problem in topology is to determine the number of components of these varieties. Through a deep result known as non-abelian Hodge theory, representation varieties are homeomorphic to moduli spaces of certain holomorphic objects called Higgs bundles. In this talk I will describe recent joint work with L. Schaposnik computing the monodromy of the Hitchin fibration for Higgs bundle moduli spaces. Our results give a new unified proof of the number of components of several representation varieties.
Instantons and Geometric Representation Theory
12:10 Thu 23 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Professor Richard Szabo :: Heriot-Watt University

We give an overview of the various approaches to studying supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on ALE spaces, and their conjectural connections to two-dimensional conformal field theory via AGT-type dualities. From a mathematical perspective, this is formulated as a relationship between the equivariant cohomology of certain moduli spaces of sheaves on stacks and the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras. We introduce an orbifold compactification of the minimal resolution of the A-type toric singularity in four dimensions, and then construct a moduli space of framed sheaves which is conjecturally isomorphic to a Nakajima quiver variety. We apply this construction to derive relations between the equivariant cohomology of these moduli spaces and the representation theory of the affine Lie algebra of type A.
Dirac operators and Hamiltonian loop group action
12:10 Fri 24 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Yanli Song :: University of Toronto

A definition to the geometric quantization for compact Hamiltonian G-spaces is given by Bott, defined as the index of the Spinc-Dirac operator on the manifold. In this talk, I will explain how to generalize this idea to the Hamiltonian LG-spaces. Instead of quantizing infinite-dimensional manifolds directly, we use its equivalent finite-dimensional model, the quasi-Hamiltonian G-spaces. By constructing twisted spinor bundle and twisted pre-quantum bundle on the quasi-Hamiltonian G-space, we define a Dirac operator whose index are given by positive energy representation of loop groups. A key role in the construction will be played by the algebraic cubic Dirac operator for loop algebra. If time permitted, I will also explain how to prove the quantization commutes with reduction theorem for Hamiltonian LG-spaces under this framework.
Workshop on Geometric Quantisation
10:10 Mon 27 Jul, 2015 :: Level 7 conference room Ingkarni Wardli :: Michele Vergne, Weiping Zhang, Eckhard Meinrenken, Nigel Higson and many others

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Geometric quantisation has been an increasingly active area since before the 1980s, with links to physics, symplectic geometry, representation theory, index theory, and differential geometry and geometric analysis in general. In addition to its relevance as a field on its own, it acts as a focal point for the interaction between all of these areas, which has yielded far-reaching and powerful results. This workshop features a large number of international speakers, who are all well-known for their work in (differential) geometry, representation theory and/or geometric analysis. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in these areas to meet and learn from some of the top mathematicians in the world. Students are especially welcome. Registration is free.
Dynamics on Networks: The role of local dynamics and global networks on hypersynchronous neural activity
15:10 Fri 31 Jul, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Prof John Terry :: University of Exeter, UK

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Graph theory has evolved into a useful tool for studying complex brain networks inferred from a variety of measures of neural activity, including fMRI, DTI, MEG and EEG. In the study of neurological disorders, recent work has discovered differences in the structure of graphs inferred from patient and control cohorts. However, most of these studies pursue a purely observational approach; identifying correlations between properties of graphs and the cohort which they describe, without consideration of the underlying mechanisms. To move beyond this necessitates the development of mathematical modelling approaches to appropriately interpret network interactions and the alterations in brain dynamics they permit.

In the talk we introduce some of these concepts with application to epilepsy, introducing a dynamic network approach to study resting state EEG recordings from a cohort of 35 people with epilepsy and 40 adult controls. Using this framework we demonstrate a strongly significant difference between networks inferred from the background activity of people with epilepsy in comparison to normal controls. Our findings demonstrate that a mathematical model based analysis of routine clinical EEG provides significant additional information beyond standard clinical interpretation, which may ultimately enable a more appropriate mechanistic stratification of people with epilepsy leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutics.

Gromov's method of convex integration and applications to minimal surfaces
12:10 Fri 7 Aug, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Finnur Larusson :: The University of Adelaide

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We start by considering an applied problem. You are interested in buying a used car. The price is tempting, but the car has a curious defect, so it is not clear whether you can even take it for a test drive. This problem illustrates the key idea of Gromov's method of convex integration. We introduce the method and some of its many applications, including new applications in the theory of minimal surfaces, and end with a sketch of ongoing joint work with Franc Forstneric.
Vanishing lattices and moduli spaces
12:10 Fri 28 Aug, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: David Baraglia :: The University of Adelaide

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Vanishing lattices are symplectic analogues of root systems. As with roots systems, they admit a classification in terms of certain Dynkin diagrams (not the usual ones from Lie theory). In this talk I will discuss this classification and if there is time I will outline my work (in progress) showing that the monodromy of the SL(n,C) Hitchin fibration is essentially a vanishing lattice.
T-duality and bulk-boundary correspondence
12:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: The University of Adelaide

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Bulk-boundary correspondences in physics can be modelled as topological boundary homomorphisms in K-theory, associated to an extension of a "bulk algebra" by a "boundary algebra". In joint work with V. Mathai, such bulk-boundary maps are shown to T-dualize into simple restriction maps in a large number of cases, generalizing what the Fourier transform does for ordinary functions. I will give examples, involving both complex and real K-theory, and explain how these results may be used to study topological phases of matter and D-brane charges in string theory.
Base change and K-theory
12:10 Fri 18 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Hang Wang :: The University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of an algebraic group can be classified by K-theory of the corresponding group C^*-algebra. We use Archimedean base change between Langlands parameters of real and complex algebraic groups to compare K-theory of the corresponding C^*-algebras of groups over different number fields. This is work in progress with K.F. Chao.
Queues and cooperative games
15:00 Fri 18 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Moshe Haviv :: Department of Statistics and the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, The Hebrew Universit

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The area of cooperative game theory deals with models in which a number of individuals, called players, can form coalitions so as to improve the utility of its members. In many cases, the formation of the grand coalition is a natural result of some negotiation or a bargaining procedure. The main question then is how the players should split the gains due to their cooperation among themselves. Various solutions have been suggested among them the Shapley value, the nucleolus and the core.

Servers in a queueing system can also join forces. For example, they can exchange service capacity among themselves or serve customers who originally seek service at their peers. The overall performance improves and the question is how they should split the gains, or, equivalently, how much each one of them needs to pay or be paid in order to cooperate with the others. Our major focus is in the core of the resulting cooperative game and in showing that in many queueing games the core is not empty.

Finally, customers who are served by the same server can also be looked at as players who form a grand coalition, now inflicting damage on each other in the form of additional waiting time. We show how cooperative game theory, specifically the Aumann-Shapley prices, leads to a way in which this damage can be attributed to individual customers or groups of customers.
Analytic complexity of bivariate holomorphic functions and cluster trees
12:10 Fri 2 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Timur Sadykov :: Plekhanov University, Moscow

The Kolmogorov-Arnold theorem yields a representation of a multivariate continuous function in terms of a composition of functions which depend on at most two variables. In the analytic case, understanding the complexity of such a representation naturally leads to the notion of the analytic complexity of (a germ of) a bivariate multi-valued analytic function. According to Beloshapka's local definition, the order of complexity of any univariate function is equal to zero while the n-th complexity class is defined recursively to consist of functions of the form a(b(x,y)+c(x,y)), where a is a univariate analytic function and b and c belong to the (n-1)-th complexity class. Such a represenation is meant to be valid for suitable germs of multi-valued holomorphic functions. A randomly chosen bivariate analytic functions will most likely have infinite analytic complexity. However, for a number of important families of special functions of mathematical physics their complexity is finite and can be computed or estimated. Using this, we introduce the notion of the analytic complexity of a binary tree, in particular, a cluster tree, and investigate its properties.
Covariant model structures and simplicial localization
12:10 Fri 30 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Danny Stevenson :: The University of Adelaide

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This talk will describe some aspects of the theory of quasi-categories, in particular the notion of left fbration and the allied covariant model structure. If B is a simplicial set, then I will describe some Quillen equivalences relating the covariant model structure on simplicial sets over B to a certain localization of simplicial presheaves on the simplex category of B. I will show how this leads to a new description of Lurie's simplicial rigidification functor as a hammock localization and describe some applications to Lurie's theory of straightening and unstraightening functors.
Near-motion-trapping in rings of cylinders (and why this is the worst possible wave energy device)
15:10 Fri 30 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Dr Hugh Wolgamot :: University of Western Australia

Motion trapping structures can oscillate indefinitely when floating in an ideal fluid. This talk discusses a simple structure which is predicted to have very close to perfect trapping behaviour, where the structure has been investigated numerically and (for the first time) experimentally. While endless oscillations were evidently not observed experimentally, remarkable differences between 'tuned' and 'detuned' structures were still apparent, and simple theory is sufficient to explain much of the behaviour. A connection with wave energy will be briefly explored, though the link is not fruitful!
Weak globularity in homotopy theory and higher category theory
12:10 Thu 12 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Simona Paoli :: University of Leicester

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Spaces and homotopy theories are fundamental objects of study of algebraic topology. One way to study these objects is to break them into smaller components with the Postnikov decomposition. To describe such decomposition purely algebraically we need higher categorical structures. We describe one approach to modelling these structures based on a new paradigm to build weak higher categories, which is the notion of weak globularity. We describe some of their connections to both homotopy theory and higher category theory.
The parametric h-principle for minimal surfaces in R^n and null curves in C^n
12:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

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I will describe new joint work with Franc Forstneric (arXiv:1602.01529). This work brings together four diverse topics from differential geometry, holomorphic geometry, and topology; namely the theory of minimal surfaces, Oka theory, convex integration theory, and the theory of absolute neighborhood retracts. Our goal is to determine the rough shape of several infinite-dimensional spaces of maps of geometric interest. It turns out that they all have the same rough shape.
Expanding maps
12:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Andy Hammerlindl :: Monash University

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Consider a function from the circle to itself such that the derivative is greater than one at every point. Examples are maps of the form f(x) = mx for integers m > 1. In some sense, these are the only possible examples. This fact and the corresponding question for maps on higher dimensional manifolds was a major motivation for Gromov to develop pioneering results in the field of geometric group theory. In this talk, I'll give an overview of this and other results relating dynamical systems to the geometry of the manifolds on which they act and (time permitting) talk about my own work in the area.
How predictable are you? Information and happiness in social media.
12:10 Mon 21 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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The explosion of ``Big Data'' coming from online social networks and the like has opened up the new field of ``computational social science'', which applies a quantitative lens to problems traditionally in the domain of psychologists, anthropologists and social scientists. What does it mean to be influential? How do ideas propagate amongst populations? Is happiness contagious? For the first time, mathematicians, statisticians, and computer scientists can provide insight into these and other questions. Using data from social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, I will give an overview of recent research trends in computational social science, describe some of my own work using techniques like sentiment analysis and information theory in this realm, and explain how you can get involved with this highly rewarding research field as well.
Counting periodic points of plane Cremona maps
12:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Tuyen Truong :: University of Adelaide

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In this talk, I will present recent results, join with Tien-Cuong Dinh and Viet-Anh Nguyen, on counting periodic points of plane Cremona maps (i.e. birational maps of P^2). The tools used include a Lefschetz fixed point formula of Saito, Iwasaki and Uehara for birational maps of surface whose fixed point set may contain curves; a bound on the arithmetic genus of curves of periodic points by Diller, Jackson and Sommerse; a result by Diller, Dujardin and Guedj on invariant (1,1) currents of meromorphic maps of compact Kahler surfaces; and a theory developed recently by Dinh and Sibony for non proper intersections of varieties. Among new results in the paper, we give a complete characterisation of when two positive closed (1,1) currents on a compact Kahler surface behave nicely in the view of Dinh and Sibony’s theory, even if their wedge intersection may not be well-defined with respect to the classical pluripotential theory. Time allows, I will present some generalisations to meromorphic maps (including an upper bound for the number of isolated periodic points which is sometimes overlooked in the literature) and open questions.
Sard Theorem for the endpoint map in sub-Riemannian manifolds
12:10 Fri 29 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Alessandro Ottazzi :: University of New South Wales

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Sub-Riemannian geometries occur in several areas of pure and applied mathematics, including harmonic analysis, PDEs, control theory, metric geometry, geometric group theory, and neurobiology. We introduce sub-Riemannian manifolds and give some examples. Therefore we discuss some of the open problems, and in particular we focus on the Sard Theorem for the endpoint map, which is related to the study of length minimizers. Finally, we consider some recent results obtained in collaboration with E. Le Donne, R. Montgomery, P. Pansu and D. Vittone.
Harmonic analysis of Hodge-Dirac operators
12:10 Fri 13 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Pierre Portal :: Australian National University

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When the metric on a Riemannian manifold is perturbed in a rough (merely bounded and measurable) manner, do basic estimates involving the Hodge Dirac operator $D = d+d^*$ remain valid? Even in the model case of a perturbation of the euclidean metric on $\mathbb{R}^n$, this is a difficult question. For instance, the fact that the $L^2$ estimate $\|Du\|_2 \sim \|\sqrt{D^{2}}u\|_2$ remains valid for perturbed versions of $D$ was a famous conjecture made by Kato in 1961 and solved, positively, in a ground breaking paper of Auscher, Hofmann, Lacey, McIntosh and Tchamitchian in 2002. In the past fifteen years, a theory has emerged from the solution of this conjecture, making rough perturbation problems much more tractable. In this talk, I will give a general introduction to this theory, and present one of its latest results: a flexible approach to $L^p$ estimates for the holomorphic functional calculus of $D$. This is joint work with D. Frey (Delft) and A. McIntosh (ANU).
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Multi-scale modeling in biofluids and particle aggregation
15:10 Fri 17 Jun, 2016 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sarthok Sircar :: University of Adelaide

In today's seminar I will give 2 examples in mathematical biology which describes the multi-scale organization at 2 levels: the meso/micro level and the continuum/macro level. I will then detail suitable tools in statistical mechanics to link these different scales. The first problem arises in mathematical physiology: swelling-de-swelling mechanism of mucus, an ionic gel. Mucus is packaged inside cells at high concentration (volume fraction) and when released into the extracellular environment, it expands in volume by two orders of magnitude in a matter of seconds. This rapid expansion is due to the rapid exchange of calcium and sodium that changes the cross-linked structure of the mucus polymers, thereby causing it to swell. Modeling this problem involves a two-phase, polymer/solvent mixture theory (in the continuum level description), together with the chemistry of the polymer, its nearest neighbor interaction and its binding with the dissolved ionic species (in the micro-scale description). The problem is posed as a free-boundary problem, with the boundary conditions derived from a combination of variational principle and perturbation analysis. The dynamics of neutral gels and the equilibrium-states of the ionic gels are analyzed. In the second example, we numerically study the adhesion fragmentation dynamics of rigid, round particles clusters subject to a homogeneous shear flow. In the macro level we describe the dynamics of the number density of these cluster. The description in the micro-scale includes (a) binding/unbinding of the bonds attached on the particle surface, (b) bond torsion, (c) surface potential due to ionic medium, and (d) flow hydrodynamics due to shear flow.
Chern-Simons invariants of Seifert manifolds via Loop spaces
14:10 Tue 28 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Ryan Mickler :: Northeastern University

Over the past 30 years the Chern-Simons functional for connections on G-bundles over three-manfolds has lead to a deep understanding of the geometry of three-manfiolds, as well as knot invariants such as the Jones polynomial. Here we study this functional for three-manfolds that are topologically given as the total space of a principal circle bundle over a compact Riemann surface base, which are known as Seifert manifolds. We show that on such manifolds the Chern-Simons functional reduces to a particular gauge-theoretic functional on the 2d base, that describes a gauge theory of connections on an infinite dimensional bundle over this base with structure group given by the level-k affine central extension of the loop group LG. We show that this formulation gives a new understanding of results of Beasley-Witten on the computability of quantum Chern-Simons invariants of these manifolds as well as knot invariants for knots that wrap a single fiber of the circle bundle. A central tool in our analysis is the Caloron correspondence of Murray-Stevenson-Vozzo.
Twists over etale groupoids and twisted vector bundles
12:10 Fri 22 Jul, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Elizabeth Gillaspy :: University of Colorado, Boulder

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Given a twist over an etale groupoid, one can construct an associated C*-algebra which carries a good deal of geometric and physical meaning; for example, the K-theory group of this C*-algebra classifies D-brane charges in string theory. Twisted vector bundles, when they exist, give rise to particularly important elements in this K-theory group. In this talk, we will explain how to use the classifying space of the etale groupoid to construct twisted vector bundles, under some mild hypotheses on the twist and the classifying space. My hope is that this talk will be accessible to a broad audience; in particular, no prior familiarity with groupoids, their twists, or the associated C*-algebras will be assumed. This is joint work with Carla Farsi.
Product Hardy spaces associated to operators with heat kernel bounds on spaces of homogeneous type
12:10 Fri 19 Aug, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Lesley Ward :: University of South Australia

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Much effort has been devoted to generalizing the Calder'on-Zygmund theory in harmonic analysis from Euclidean spaces to metric measure spaces, or spaces of homogeneous type. Here the underlying space R^n with Euclidean metric and Lebesgue measure is replaced by a set X with general metric or quasi-metric and a doubling measure. Further, one can replace the Laplacian operator that underpins the Calderon-Zygmund theory by more general operators L satisfying heat kernel estimates. I will present recent joint work with P. Chen, X.T. Duong, J. Li and L.X. Yan along these lines. We develop the theory of product Hardy spaces H^p_{L_1,L_2}(X_1 x X_2), for 1
Singular vector bundles and topological semi-metals
12:10 Fri 2 Sep, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: University of Adelaide

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The elusive Weyl fermion was recently realised as quasiparticle excitations of a topological semimetal. I will explain what a semi-metal is, and the precise mathematical sense in which they can be "topological", in the sense of the general theory of topological insulators. This involves understanding vector bundles with singularities, with the aid of Mayer-Vietoris principles, gerbes, and generalised degree theory.
Geometry of pseudodifferential algebra bundles
12:10 Fri 16 Sep, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

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I will motivate the construction of pseudodifferential algebra bundles arising in index theory, and also outline the construction of general pseudodifferential algebra bundles (and the associated sphere bundles), showing that there are many that are purely infinite dimensional that do not come from usual constructions in index theory. I will also discuss characteristic classes of such bundles. This is joint work with Richard Melrose.
On the Willmore energy
15:10 Fri 7 Oct, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Dr Yann Bernard :: Monash University

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The Willmore energy of a surface captures its bending. Originally discovered 200 years ago by Sophie Germain in the context of elasticity theory, it has since then been rediscovered numerous times in several areas of science: general relativity, optics, string theory, conformal geometry, and cell biology. For example, our red blood cells assume a peculiar shape that minimises the Willmore energy. In this talk, I will present the thrilling history of the Willmore energy, its applications, and its main properties. The presentation will be accessible to all mathematicians as well as to advanced undergraduate students.
Character Formula for Discrete Series
12:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

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Weyl character formula describes characters of irreducible representations of compact Lie groups. This formula can be obtained using geometric method, for example, from the Atiyah-Bott fixed point theorem or the Atiyah-Segal-Singer index theorem. Harish-Chandra character formula, the noncompact analogue of the Weyl character formula, can also be studied from the point of view of index theory. We apply orbital integrals on K-theory of Harish-Chandra Schwartz algebra of a semisimple Lie group G, and then use geometric method to deduce Harish-Chandra character formulas for discrete series representations of G. This is work in progress with Peter Hochs.
Parahoric bundles, invariant theory and the Kazhdan-Lusztig map
12:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

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In this talk I will introduce the notion of parahoric groups, a loop group analogue of parabolic subgroups. I will also discuss a global version of this, namely parahoric bundles on a complex curve. This leads us to a problem concerning the behaviour of invariant polynomials on the dual of the Lie algebra, a kind of "parahoric invariant theory". The key to solving this problem turns out to be the Kazhdan-Lusztig map, which assigns to each nilpotent orbit in a semisimple Lie algebra a conjugacy class in the Weyl group. Based on joint work with Masoud Kamgarpour and Rohith Varma.
Leavitt path algebras
12:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Engineering & Math EM213 :: Roozbeh Hazrat :: Western Sydney University

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From a directed graph one can generate an algebra which captures the movements along the graph. One such algebras are Leavitt path algebras. Despite being introduced only 10 years ago, Leavitt path algebras have arisen in a variety of different contexts as diverse as analysis, symbolic dynamics, noncommutative geometry and representation theory. In fact, Leavitt path algebras are algebraic counterpart to graph C*-algebras, a theory which has become an area of intensive research globally. There are strikingly parallel similarities between these two theories. Even more surprisingly, one cannot (yet) obtain the results in one theory as a consequence of the other; the statements look the same, however the techniques to prove them are quite different (as the names suggest, one uses Algebra and other Analysis). These all suggest that there might be a bridge between Algebra and Analysis yet to be uncovered. In this talk, we introduce Leavitt path algebras and try to classify them by means of (graded) Grothendieck groups. We will ask nice questions!
Diffeomorphisms of discs, harmonic spinors and positive scalar curvature
11:10 Fri 17 Mar, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N218 :: Diarmuid Crowley :: University of Melbourne

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Let Diff(D^k) be the space of diffeomorphisms of the k-disc fixing the boundary point wise. In this talk I will show for k > 5, that the homotopy groups \pi_*Diff(D^k) have non-zero 8-periodic 2-torsion detected in real K-theory. I will then discuss applications for spin manifolds M of dimension 6 or greater: 1) Our results input to arguments of Hitchin which now show that M admits a metric with a harmonic spinor. 2) If non-empty, space of positive scalar curvature metrics on M has non-zero 8-periodic 2-torsion in its homotopy groups which is detected in real K-theory. This is part of joint work with Thomas Schick and Wolfgang Steimle.
What is index theory?
12:10 Tue 21 Mar, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Index theory is a link between topology, geometry and analysis. A typical theorem in index theory says that two numbers are equal: an analytic index and a topological index. The first theorem of this kind was the index theorem of Atiyah and Singer, which they proved in 1963. Index theorems have many applications in maths and physics. For example, they can be used to prove that a differential equation must have a solution. Also, they imply that the topology of a space like a sphere or a torus determines in what ways it can be curved. Topology is the study of geometric properties that do not change if we stretch or compress a shape without cutting or glueing. Curvature does change when we stretch something out, so it is surprising that topology can say anything about curvature. Index theory has many surprising consequences like this.
Minimal surfaces and complex analysis
12:10 Fri 24 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Antonio Alarcon :: University of Granada

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A surface in the Euclidean space R^3 is said to be minimal if it is locally area-minimizing, meaning that every point in the surface admits a compact neighborhood with the least area among all the surfaces with the same boundary. Although the origin of minimal surfaces is in physics, since they can be realized locally as soap films, this family of surfaces lies in the intersection of many fields of mathematics. In particular, complex analysis in one and several variables plays a fundamental role in the theory. In this lecture we will discuss the influence of complex analysis in the study of minimal surfaces.
K-types of tempered representations
12:10 Fri 7 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of a reductive Lie group G are the irreducible unitary representations one needs in the Plancherel decomposition of L^2(G). They are relevant to harmonic analysis because of this, and also occur in the Langlands classification of the larger class of admissible representations. If K in G is a maximal compact subgroup, then there is a considerable amount of information in the restriction of a tempered representation to K. In joint work with Yanli Song and Shilin Yu, we give a geometric expression for the decomposition of such a restriction into irreducibles. The multiplicities of these irreducibles are expressed as indices of Dirac operators on reduced spaces of a coadjoint orbit of G corresponding to the representation. These reduced spaces are Spin-c analogues of reduced spaces in symplectic geometry, defined in terms of moment maps that represent conserved quantities. This result involves a Spin-c version of the quantisation commutes with reduction principle for noncompact manifolds. For discrete series representations, this was done by Paradan in 2003.
Poisson-Lie T-duality and integrability
11:10 Thu 13 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering & Math EM213 :: Ctirad Klimcik :: Aix-Marseille University, Marseille

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The Poisson-Lie T-duality relates sigma-models with target spaces symmetric with respect to mutually dual Poisson-Lie groups. In the special case if the Poisson-Lie symmetry reduces to the standard non-Abelian symmetry one of the corresponding mutually dual sigma-models is the standard principal chiral model which is known to enjoy the property of integrability. A natural question whether this non-Abelian integrability can be lifted to integrability of sigma model dualizable with respect to the general Poisson-Lie symmetry has been answered in the affirmative by myself in 2008. The corresponding Poisson-Lie symmetric and integrable model is a one-parameter deformation of the principal chiral model and features a remarkable explicit appearance of the standard Yang-Baxter operator in the target space geometry. Several distinct integrable deformations of the Yang-Baxter sigma model have been then subsequently uncovered which turn out to be related by the Poisson-Lie T-duality to the so called lambda-deformed sigma models. My talk gives a review of these developments some of which found applications in string theory in the framework of the AdS/CFT correspondence.
Hyperbolic geometry and knots
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: A/Prof Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

It has been known since the early 1980s that the complement of a knot or link decomposes into geometric pieces, and the most common geometry is hyperbolic. However, the connections between hyperbolic geometry and other knot and link invariants are not well-understood. Conjectured connections have applications to quantum topology and physics, 3-manifold geometry and topology, and knot theory. In this talk, we will describe several results relating the hyperbolic geometry of a knot or link to other invariants, and their implications.
Hodge theory on the moduli space of Riemann surfaces
12:10 Fri 5 May, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Jesse Gell-Redman :: University of Melbourne

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The Hodge theorem on a closed Riemannian manifold identifies the deRham cohomology with the space of harmonic differential forms. Although there are various extensions of the Hodge theorem to singular or complete but non-compact spaces, when there is an identification of L^2 Harmonic forms with a topological feature of the underlying space, it is highly dependent on the nature of infinity (in the non-compact case) or the locus of incompleteness; no unifying theorem treats all cases. We will discuss work toward extending the Hodge theorem to singular Riemannian manifolds where the singular locus is an incomplete cusp edge. These can be pictured locally as a bundle of horns, and they provide a model for the behavior of the Weil-Petersson metric on the compactified Riemann moduli space near the interior of a divisor. Joint with J. Swoboda and R. Melrose.
Graded K-theory and C*-algebras
11:10 Fri 12 May, 2017 :: Engineering North 218 :: Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

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C*-algebras can be regarded, in a very natural way, as noncommutative algebras of continuous functions on topological spaces. The analogy is strong enough that topological K-theory in terms of formal differences of vector bundles has a direct analogue for C*-algebras. There is by now a substantial array of tools out there for computing C*-algebraic K-theory. However, when we want to model physical phenomena, like topological phases of matter, we need to take into account various physical symmetries, some of which are encoded by gradings of C*-algebras by the two-element group. Even the definition of graded C*-algebraic K-theory is not entirely settled, and there are relatively few computational tools out there. I will try to outline what a C*-algebra (and a graded C*-algebra is), indicate what graded K-theory ought to look like, and discuss recent work with Alex Kumjian and David Pask linking this with the deep and powerful work of Kasparov, and using this to develop computational tools.
Lagrangian transport in deterministic flows: from theory to experiment
16:10 Tue 16 May, 2017 :: Engineering North N132 :: Dr Michel Speetjens :: Eindhoven University of Technology

Transport of scalar quantities (e.g. chemical species, nutrients, heat) in deterministic flows is key to a wide range of phenomena and processes in industry and Nature. This encompasses length scales ranging from microns to hundreds of kilometres, and includes systems as diverse as viscous flows in the processing industry, micro-fluidic flows in labs-on-a-chip and porous media, large-scale geophysical and environmental flows, physiological and biological flows and even continuum descriptions of granular flows. Essential to the net transport of a scalar quantity is its advection by the fluid motion. The Lagrangian perspective (arguably) is the most natural way to investigate advection and leans on the fact that fluid trajectories are organized into coherent structures that geometrically determine the advective transport properties. Lagrangian transport is typically investigated via theoretical and computational studies and often concerns idealized flow situations that are difficult (or even impossible) to create in laboratory experiments. However, bridging the gap from theoretical and computational results to realistic flows is essential for their physical meaningfulness and practical relevance. This presentation highlights a number of fundamental Lagrangian transport phenomena and properties in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows and demonstrates their physical validity by way of representative and experimentally realizable flows.
Real bundle gerbes
12:10 Fri 19 May, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Michael Murray :: University of Adelaide

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Bundle gerbe modules, via the notion of bundle gerbe K-theory provide a realisation of twisted K-theory. I will discuss the existence or Real bundle gerbes which are the corresponding objects required to construct Real twisted K-theory in the sense of Atiyah. This is joint work with Richard Szabo (Heriot-Watt), Pedram Hekmati (Auckland) and Raymond Vozzo which appeared in arXiv:1608.06466.
Probabilistic approaches to human cognition: What can the math tell us?
15:10 Fri 26 May, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Dr Amy Perfors :: School of Psychology, University of Adelaide

Why do people avoid vaccinating their children? Why, in groups, does it seem like the most extreme positions are weighted more highly? On the surface, both of these examples look like instances of non-optimal or irrational human behaviour. This talk presents preliminary evidence suggesting, however, that in both cases this pattern of behaviour is sensible given certain assumptions about the structure of the world and the nature of beliefs. In the case of vaccination, we model people's choices using expected utility theory. This reveals that their ignorance about the nature of diseases like whooping cough makes them underweight the negative utility attached to contracting such a disease. When that ignorance is addressed, their values and utilities shift. In the case of extreme positions, we use simulations of chains of Bayesian learners to demonstrate that whenever information is propagated in groups, the views of the most extreme learners naturally gain more traction. This effect emerges as the result of basic mathematical assumptions rather than human irrationality.
Mathematics is Biology's Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered "an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or "motifs"), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Mathematics is Biology'€™s Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered “an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or “motifs”), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Conway's Rational Tangle
12:10 Tue 15 Aug, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Hang Wang :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Many researches in mathematics essentially feature some classification problems. In this context, invariants are created in order to associate algebraic quantities, such as numbers and groups, to elements of interested classes of geometric objects, such as surfaces. A key property of an invariant is that it does not change under ``allowable moves'' which can be specified in various geometric contexts. We demonstrate these lines of ideas by rational tangles, a notion in knot theory. A tangle is analogous to a link except that it has free ends. Conway's rational tangles are the simplest tangles that can be ``unwound'' under a finite sequence of two simple moves, and they arise as building blocks for knots. A numerical invariant will be introduced for Conway's rational tangles and it provides the only known example of a complete invariant in knot theory.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 18 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

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A pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous space $M$ of finite volume can be presented as $M=G/H$, where $G$ is a Lie group acting transitively and isometrically on $M$, and $H$ is a closed subgroup of $G$. The condition that $G$ acts isometrically and thus preserves a finite measure on $M$ leads to strong algebraic restrictions on $G$. In the special case where $G$ has no compact semisimple normal subgroups, it turns out that the isotropy subgroup $H$ is a lattice, and that the metric on $M$ comes from a bi-invariant metric on $G$. This result allows us to recover Zeghib’s classification of Lorentzian compact homogeneous spaces, and to move towards a classification for metric index 2. As an application we can investigate which pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces of finite volume are Einstein spaces. Through the existence questions for lattice subgroups, this leads to an interesting connection with the theory of transcendental numbers, which allows us to characterize the Einstein cases in low dimensions. This talk is based on joint works with Oliver Baues, Yuri Nikolayevsky and Abdelghani Zeghib.
Topology as a tool in algebra
15:10 Fri 8 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Zsuzsanna Dancso :: University of Sydney

Topologists often use algebra in order to understand the shape of a space: invariants such as homology and cohomology are basic, and very successful, examples of this principle. Although topology is used as a tool in algebra less often, I will describe a recurring pattern on the border of knot theory and quantum algebra where this is possible. We will explore how the tangled topology of "flying circles in R^3" is deeply related to a famous problem in Lie theory: the Kashiwara-Vergne (KV) problem (first solved in 2006 by Alekseev-Meinrenken). I will explain how this relationship illuminates the intricate algebra of the KV problem.
In space there is no-one to hear you scream
12:10 Tue 12 Sep, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: A/Prof Gary Glonek :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Modern data problems often involve data in very high dimensions. For example, gene expression profiles, used to develop cancer screening models, typically have at least 30,000 dimensions. When dealing with such data, it is natural to apply intuition from low dimensional cases. For example, in a sample of normal observations, a typical data point will be near the centre of the distribution with only a small number of points at the edges. In this talk, simple probability theory will be used to show that the geometry of data in high dimensional space is very different from what we can see in one and two-dimensional examples. We will show that the typical data point is at the edge of the distribution, a long way from its centre and even further from any other points.
On the fundamental of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and interfacial mixing
15:10 Fri 15 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Snezhana Abarzhi :: University of Western Australia

Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) develops when fluids of different densities are accelerated against their density gradient. Extensive interfacial mixing of the fluids ensues with time. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing controls a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials, in high and low energy density regimes, at astrophysical and atomistic scales. Examples include formation of hot spot in inertial confinement, supernova explosion, stellar and planetary convection, flows in atmosphere and ocean, reactive and supercritical fluids, material transformation under impact and light-material interaction. In some of these cases (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) RT mixing should be tightly mitigated; in some others (e.g. turbulent combustion) it should be strongly enhanced. Understanding the fundamentals of RTI is crucial for achieving a better control of non-equilibrium processes in nature and technology. Traditionally, it was presumed that RTI leads to uncontrolled growth of small-scale imperfections, single-scale nonlinear dynamics, and extensive mixing that is similar to canonical turbulence. The recent success of the theory and experiments in fluids and plasmas suggests an alternative scenario of RTI evolution. It finds that the interface is necessary for RT mixing to accelerate, the acceleration effects are strong enough to suppress the development of turbulence, and the RT dynamics is multi-scale and has significant degree of order. This talk presents a physics-based consideration of fundamentals of RTI and RT mixing, and summarizes what is certain and what is not so certain in our knowledge of RTI. The focus question - How to influence the regularization process in RT mixing? We also discuss new opportunities for improvements of predictive modeling capabilities, physical description, and control of RT mixing in fluids, plasmas and materials.
Equivariant formality of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 29 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Alex Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

Equivariant formality, a notion in equivariant topology introduced by Goresky-Kottwitz-Macpherson, is a desirable property of spaces with group actions, which allows the application of localisation formula to evaluate integrals of any top closed forms and enables one to compute easily the equivariant cohomology. Broad classes of spaces of especial interest are well-known to be equivariantly formal, e.g., compact symplectic manifolds equipped with Hamiltonian compact Lie group actions and projective varieties equipped with linear algebraic torus actions, of which flag varieties are examples. Less is known about compact homogeneous spaces G/K equipped with the isotropy action of K, which is not necessarily of maximal rank. In this talk we will review previous attempts of characterizing equivariant formality of G/K, and present our recent results on this problem using an analogue of equivariant formality in K-theory. Part of the work presented in this talk is joint with Jeffrey Carlson.
Operator algebras in rigid C*-tensor categories
12:10 Fri 6 Oct, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Corey Jones :: Australian National University

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In noncommutative geometry, operator algebras are often regarded as the algebras of functions on noncommutative spaces. Rigid C*-tensor categories are algebraic structures that appear in the study of quantum field theories, subfactors, and compact quantum groups. We will explain how they can be thought of as ``noncommutative'' versions of the tensor category of Hilbert spaces. Combining these two viewpoints, we describe a notion of operator algebras internal to a rigid C*-tensor category, and discuss applications to the theory of subfactors.
Springer correspondence for symmetric spaces
12:10 Fri 17 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Ting Xue :: University of Melbourne

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The Springer theory for reductive algebraic groups plays an important role in representation theory. It relates nilpotent orbits in the Lie algebra to irreducible representations of the Weyl group. We develop a Springer theory in the case of symmetric spaces using Fourier transform, which relates nilpotent orbits in this setting to irreducible representations of Hecke algebras of various Coxeter groups with specified parameters. This in turn gives rise to character sheaves on symmetric spaces, which we describe explicitly in the case of classical symmetric spaces. A key ingredient in the construction is the nearby cycle sheaves associated to the adjoint quotient map. The talk is based on joint work with Kari Vilonen and partly based on joint work with Misha Grinberg and Kari Vilonen.
A Hecke module structure on the KK-theory of arithmetic groups
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Bram Mesland :: University of Bonn

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Let $G$ be a locally compact group, $\Gamma$ a discrete subgroup and $C_{G}(\Gamma)$ the commensurator of $\Gamma$ in $G$. The cohomology of $\Gamma$ is a module over the Shimura Hecke ring of the pair $(\Gamma,C_G(\Gamma))$. This construction recovers the action of the Hecke operators on modular forms for $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$ as a particular case. In this talk I will discuss how the Shimura Hecke ring of a pair $(\Gamma, C_{G}(\Gamma))$ maps into the $KK$-ring associated to an arbitrary $\Gamma$-C*-algebra. From this we obtain a variety of $K$-theoretic Hecke modules. In the case of manifolds the Chern character provides a Hecke equivariant transformation into cohomology, which is an isomorphism in low dimensions. We discuss Hecke equivariant exact sequences arising from possibly noncommutative compactifications of $\Gamma$-spaces. Examples include the Borel-Serre and geodesic compactifications of the universal cover of an arithmetic manifold, and the totally disconnected boundary of the Bruhat-Tits tree of $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$. This is joint work with M.H. Sengun (Sheffield).
Radial Toeplitz operators on bounded symmetric domains
11:10 Fri 9 Mar, 2018 :: Lower Napier LG11 :: Raul Quiroga-Barranco :: CIMAT, Guanajuato, Mexico

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The Bergman spaces on a complex domain are defined as the space of holomorphic square-integrable functions on the domain. These carry interesting structures both for analysis and representation theory in the case of bounded symmetric domains. On the other hand, these spaces have some bounded operators obtained as the composition of a multiplier operator and a projection. These operators are highly noncommuting between each other. However, there exist large commutative C*-algebras generated by some of these Toeplitz operators very much related to Lie groups. I will construct an example of such C*-algebras and provide a fairly explicit simultaneous diagonalization of the generating Toeplitz operators.
Family gauge theory and characteristic classes of bundles of 4-manifolds
13:10 Fri 16 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hokuto Konno :: University of Tokyo

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I will define a non-trivial characteristic class of bundles of 4-manifolds using families of Seiberg-Witten equations. The basic idea of the construction is to consider an infinite dimensional analogue of the Euler class used in the usual theory of characteristic classes. I will also explain how to prove the non-triviality of this characteristic class. If time permits, I will mention a relation between our characteristic class and positive scalar curvature metrics.
Complexity of 3-Manifolds
15:10 Fri 23 Mar, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: A/Prof Stephan Tillmann :: University of Sydney

In this talk, I will give a general introduction to complexity of 3-manifolds and explain the connections between combinatorics, algebra, geometry, and topology that arise in its study. The complexity of a 3-manifold is the minimum number of tetrahedra in a triangulation of the manifold. It was defined and first studied by Matveev in 1990. The complexity is generally difficult to compute, and various upper and lower bounds have been derived during the last decades using fundamental group, homology or hyperbolic volume. Effective bounds have only been found in joint work with Jaco, Rubinstein and, more recently, Spreer. Our bounds not only allowed us to determine the first infinite classes of minimal triangulations of closed 3-manifolds, but they also lead to a structure theory of minimal triangulations of 3-manifolds.
Index of Equivariant Callias-Type Operators
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hao Guo :: University of Adelaide

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Suppose M is a smooth Riemannian manifold on which a Lie group G acts properly and isometrically. In this talk I will explore properties of a particular class of G-invariant operators on M, called G-Callias-type operators. These are Dirac operators that have been given an additional Z_2-grading and a perturbation so as to be "invertible outside of a cocompact set in M". It turns out that G-Callias-type operators are equivariantly Fredholm and so have an index in the K-theory of the maximal group C*-algebra of G. This index can be expressed as a KK-product of a class in K-homology and a class in the K-theory of the Higson G-corona. In fact, one can show that the K-theory of the Higson G-corona is highly non-trivial, and thus the index theory of G-Callias-type operators is not obviously trivial. As an application of the index theory of G-Callias-type operators, I will mention an obstruction to the existence of G-invariant metrics of positive scalar curvature on M.
Braid groups and higher representation theory
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Tony Licata :: Australian National University

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The Artin braid group arise in a number of different parts of mathematics. The goal of this talk will be to explain how basic group-theoretic questions about the Artin braid group can be answered using some modern tools of linear and homological algebra, with an eye toward proving some open conjectures about other groups.
Knot homologies
15:10 Fri 4 May, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Dr Anthony Licata :: Australian National University

The last twenty years have seen a lot of interaction between low-dimensional topology and representation theory. One facet of this interaction concerns "knot homologies," which are homological invariants of knots; the most famous of these, Khovanov homology, comes from the higher representation theory of sl_2. The goal of this talk will be to give a gentle introduction to this subject to non-experts by telling you a bit about Khovanov homology.
Obstructions to smooth group actions on 4-manifolds from families Seiberg-Witten theory
13:10 Fri 25 May, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

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Let X be a smooth, compact, oriented 4-manifold and consider the following problem. Let G be a group which acts on the second cohomology of X preserving the intersection form. Can this action of G on H^2(X) be lifted to an action of G on X by diffeomorphisms? We study a parametrised version of Seiberg-Witten theory for smooth families of 4-manifolds and obtain obstructions to the existence of such lifts. For example, we construct compact simply-connected 4-manifolds X and involutions on H^2(X) that can be realised by a continuous involution on X, or by a diffeomorphism, but not by an involutive diffeomorphism for any smooth structure on X.
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.
Min-max theory for hypersurfaces of prescribed mean curvature
11:10 Fri 17 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Jonathan Zhu :: Harvard University

We describe the construction of closed prescribed mean curvature (PMC) hypersurfaces using min-max methods. Our theory allows us to show the existence of closed PMC hypersurfaces in a given closed Riemannian manifold for a generic set of ambient prescription functions. This set includes, in particular, all constant functions as well as analytic functions if the manifold is real analytic. The described work is joint with Xin Zhou.
Discrete fluxes and duality in gauge theory
11:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Siye Wu :: National Tsinghua University

We explore the notions of discrete electric and magnetic fluxes introduced by 't Hooft in the late 1970s. After explaining their physics origin, we consider the description in mathematical terminology. We finally study their role in duality.
Geometry and Topology of Crystals
11:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Vanessa Robins :: Australian National University

This talk will cover some highlights of the mathematical description of crystal structure from the platonic polyhedra of ancient Greece to the current picture of crystallographic groups as orbifolds. Modern materials synthesis raises fascinating questions about the enumeration and classification of periodic interwoven or entangled frameworks, that might be addressed by techniques from 3-manifold topology and knot theory.
Topological Data Analysis
15:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: Dr Vanessa Robins :: Australian National University

Topological Data Analysis has grown out of work focussed on deriving qualitative and yet quantifiable information about the shape of data. The underlying assumption is that knowledge of shape - the way the data are distributed - permits high-level reasoning and modelling of the processes that created this data. The 0-th order aspect of shape is the number pieces: "connected components" to a topologist; "clustering" to a statistician. Higher-order topological aspects of shape are holes, quantified as "non-bounding cycles" in homology theory. These signal the existence of some type of constraint on the data-generating process. Homology lends itself naturally to computer implementation, but its naive application is not robust to noise. This inspired the development of persistent homology: an algebraic topological tool that measures changes in the topology of a growing sequence of spaces (a filtration). Persistent homology provides invariants called the barcodes or persistence diagrams that are sets of intervals recording the birth and death parameter values of each homology class in the filtration. It captures information about the shape of data over a range of length scales, and enables the identification of "noisy" topological structure. Statistical analysis of persistent homology has been challenging because the raw information (the persistence diagrams) are provided as sets of intervals rather than functions. Various approaches to converting persistence diagrams to functional forms have been developed recently, and have found application to data ranging from the distribution of galaxies, to porous materials, and cancer detection.
Noncommutative principal G-bundles
11:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Keith Hannabuss :: University of Oxford

Noncommutative geometry provides greater flexibility for studying some problems. This seminar will survey some work on noncommutative principal G-bundles. These were classified for abelian groups some years ago, but nonabelian groups require a different approach, using tools developed for a totally different reason in the 1980s. This uncovers links with ergodic theory, quantum groups and the Yang-Baxter equation.
Exceptional quantum symmetries
11:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

I will survey our current understanding of "quantum symmetries", the mathematical models of topological order, in particular through the formalism of fusion categories. Our very limited classification results to date point to nearly all examples being built out of data coming from finite groups, quantum groups at roots of unity, and cohomological data. However, there are a small number of "exceptional" quantum symmetries that so far appear to be disconnected from the world of classical symmetries as studied in representation theory and group theory. I'll give an update on recent progress understanding these examples.
Interactive theorem proving for mathematicians
15:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

Mathematicians use computers to write their proofs (LaTeX), and to do their calculations (Sage, Mathematica, Maple, Matlab, etc, as well as custom code for simulations or searches). However today we rarely use computers to help us to construct and understand proofs. There is a long tradition in computer science of interactive and automatic theorem proving; particularly today these are important tools in engineering correct software, as well as in optimisation and compilation. There have been some notable examples of formalisation of modern mathematics (e.g. the odd order theorem, the Kepler conjecture, and the four-colour theorem). Even in these cases, huge engineering efforts were required to translate the mathematics to a form a computer could understand. Moreover, in most areas of research there is a huge gap between the interests of human mathematicians and the abilities of computer provers. Nevertheless, I think it's time for mathematicians to start getting interested in interactive theorem provers! It's now possible to write proofs, and write tools that help write proofs, in languages which are expressive enough to encompass most of modern mathematics, and ergonomic enough to use for general purpose programming. I'll give an informal introduction to dependent type theory (the logical foundation of many modern theorem provers), some examples of doing mathematics in such a system, and my experiences working with mathematics students in these systems.
Twisted K-theory of compact Lie groups and extended Verlinde algebras
11:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

In a series of recent papers, Freed, Hopkins and Teleman put forth a deep result which identifies the twisted K -theory of a compact Lie group G with the representation theory of its loop group LG. Under suitable conditions, both objects can be enhanced to the Verlinde algebra, which appears in mathematical physics as the Frobenius algebra of a certain topological quantum field theory, and in algebraic geometry as the algebra encoding information of moduli spaces of G-bundles over Riemann surfaces. The Verlinde algebra for G with nice connectedness properties have been well-known. However, explicit descriptions of such for disconnected G are lacking. In this talk, I will discuss the various aspects of the Freed-Hopkins-Teleman Theorem and partial results on an extension of the Verlinde algebra arising from a disconnected G. The talk is based on work in progress joint with David Baraglia and Varghese Mathai.
Random walks
15:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Kais Hamza :: Monash University

A random walk is arguably the most basic stochastic process one can define. It is also among the most intuitive objects in the theory of probability and stochastic processes. For these and other reasons, it is one of the most studied processes or rather family of processes, finding applications in all areas of science, technology and engineering. In this talk, I will start by recalling some of the classical results for random walks and then discuss some of my own recent explorations in this area of research that has maintained relevance for decades.
An Introduction to Ricci Flow
11:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Miles Simon :: University of Magdeburg

In these three talks we give an introduction to Ricci flow and present some applications thereof. After introducing the Ricci flow we present some theorems and arguments from the theory of linear and non-linear parabolic equations. We explain why this theory guarantees that there is always a solution to the Ricci flow for a short time for any given smooth initial metric on a compact manifold without boundary. We calculate evolution equations for certain geometric quantities, and present some examples of maximum principle type arguments. In the last lecture we present some geometric results which are derived with the help of the Ricci flow.

News matching "Representation theory"

ARC success
The School of Mathematical Sciences was again very successful in attracting Australian Research Council funding for 2008. Recipients of ARC Discovery Projects are (with staff from the School highlighted):

Prof NG Bean; Prof PG Howlett; Prof CE Pearce; Prof SC Beecham; Dr AV Metcalfe; Dr JW Boland: WaterLog - A mathematical model to implement recommendations of The Wentworth Group.

2008-2010: $645,000

Prof RJ Elliott: Dynamic risk measures. (Australian Professorial Fellowship)

2008-2012: $897,000

Dr MD Finn: Topological Optimisation of Fluid Mixing.

2008-2010: $249,000

Prof PG Bouwknegt; Prof M Varghese; A/Prof S Wu: Dualities in String Theory and Conformal Field Theory in the context of the Geometric Langlands Program.

2008-2010: $240,000

The latter grant is held through the ANU Posted Wed 26 Sep 07.

Sam Cohen wins prize for best student talk at ANZIAM 2009
Congratulations to Mr Sam Cohen, a PhD student within the School, who was awarded the T. M. Cherry Prize for the best student paper at the 2009 meeting of ANZIAM for his talk on A general theory of backward stochastic difference equations. Posted Fri 6 Feb 09.
ARC Grant successes
Congratulations to Tony Roberts, Charles Pearce, Robert Elliot, Andrew Metcalfe and all their collaborators on their success in the current round of ARC grants. The projects are "Development of innovative technologies for oil production based on the advanced theory of suspension flows in porous media" (Tony Roberts et al.), "Perturbation and approximation methods for linear operators with applications to train control, water resource management and evolution of physical systems" (Charles Pearce et al.), "Risk Measures and Management in Finance and Actuarial Science Under Regime-Switching Models" (Robert Elliott et al.) and "A new flood design methodology for a variable and changing climate" (Andrew Metcalfe et al.) Posted Mon 26 Oct 09.
ARC Grant successes
The School of Mathematical Sciences has again had outstanding success in the ARC Discovery and Linkage Projects schemes. Congratulations to the following staff for their success in the Discovery Project scheme: Prof Nigel Bean, Dr Josh Ross, Prof Phil Pollett, Prof Peter Taylor, New methods for improving active adaptive management in biological systems, $255,000 over 3 years; Dr Josh Ross, New methods for integrating population structure and stochasticity into models of disease dynamics, $248,000 over three years; A/Prof Matt Roughan, Dr Walter Willinger, Internet traffic-matrix synthesis, $290,000 over three years; Prof Patricia Solomon, A/Prof John Moran, Statistical methods for the analysis of critical care data, with application to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Database, $310,000 over 3 years; Prof Mathai Varghese, Prof Peter Bouwknegt, Supersymmetric quantum field theory, topology and duality, $375,000 over 3 years; Prof Peter Taylor, Prof Nigel Bean, Dr Sophie Hautphenne, Dr Mark Fackrell, Dr Malgorzata O'Reilly, Prof Guy Latouche, Advanced matrix-analytic methods with applications, $600,000 over 3 years. Congratulations to the following staff for their success in the Linkage Project scheme: Prof Simon Beecham, Prof Lee White, A/Prof John Boland, Prof Phil Howlett, Dr Yvonne Stokes, Mr John Wells, Paving the way: an experimental approach to the mathematical modelling and design of permeable pavements, $370,000 over 3 years; Dr Amie Albrecht, Prof Phil Howlett, Dr Andrew Metcalfe, Dr Peter Pudney, Prof Roderick Smith, Saving energy on trains - demonstration, evaluation, integration, $540,000 over 3 years Posted Fri 29 Oct 10.
New Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science
Professor Mathai Varghese, Professor of Pure Mathematics and ARC Professorial Fellow within the School of Mathematical Sciences, was elected to the Australian Academy of Science. Professor Varghese's citation read "for his distinguished for his work in geometric analysis involving the topology of manifolds, including the Mathai-Quillen formalism in topological field theory.". Posted Tue 30 Nov 10.
ARC Future Fellowship success
Associate Professor Zudi Lu has been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship. Associate Professor Lu, and Associate Professor in Statistics, will use the support provided by his Future Fellowship to further improve the theory and practice of econometric modelling of nonlinear spatial time series. Congratulations Zudi. Posted Thu 12 May 11.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
(5–9 September 2011) Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage Posted Wed 27 Jul 11.

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ARC Grant Success
Congratulations to the following staff who were successful in securing funding from the Australian Research Council Discovery Projects Scheme. Associate Professor Finnur Larusson awarded $270,000 for his project Flexibility and symmetry in complex geometry; Dr Thomas Leistner, awarded $303,464 for his project Holonomy groups in Lorentzian geometry, Professor Michael Murray Murray and Dr Daniel Stevenson (Glasgow), awarded $270,000 for their project Bundle gerbes: generalisations and applications; Professor Mathai Varghese, awarded $105,000 for his project Advances in index theory and Prof Anthony Roberts and Professor Ioannis Kevrekidis (Princeton) awarded $330,000 for their project Accurate modelling of large multiscale dynamical systems for engineering and scientific simulation and analysis Posted Tue 8 Nov 11.
Dualities in field theories and the role of K-theory
Between Monday 19 and Friday 23 March 2012, the Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a lecture series by Professor Jonathan Rosenberg from the University of Maryland. There will be additional talks by other invited speakers. Posted Tue 6 Dec 11.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project is expected to enhance Australia’s position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project will enhance Australia's position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Publications matching "Representation theory"

Publications
Non-commutative correspondences, duality and D-branes in bivariant K-theory
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 13 (497–552) 2009
Portfolio risk minimization and differential games
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications In Press (–) 2009
The maximum size of the intersection of two ovoids
Butler, David, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 116 (242–245) 2009
D-branes, KK-theory and duality on noncommutative spaces
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Print Edition) 103 (1–13) 2008
Nonclassical symmetry solutions for reaction-diffusion equations with explicity spatial dependence
Hajek, Bronwyn; Edwards, M; Broadbridge, P; Williams, G, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications 67 (2541–2552) 2007
Special tensors in the deformation theory of quadratic algebras for the classical Lie algebras
Eastwood, Michael; Somberg, P; Soucek, V, Journal of Geometry and Physics 57 (2539–2546) 2007
T-Duality in type II string theory via noncommutative geometry and beyond
Varghese, Mathai, Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement 171 (237–257) 2007
Duality symmetry and the form fields of M-theory
Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Print Edition) 6 (0–10) 2006
Dynamic portfolio allocation, the dual theory of choice and probability distortion functions
Hamada, M; Sherris, M; Van Der Hoek, John, Astin Bulletin 31 (187–217) 2006
Flock generalized quadrangles and tetradic sets of elliptic quadrics of PG(3, q)
Barwick, Susan; Brown, Matthew; Penttila, T, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 113 (273–290) 2006
The elliptic curves in gauge theory, string theory, and cohomology
Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Print Edition) 3 (0–19) 2006
Yang-Mills theory for bundle gerbes
Varghese, Mathai; Roberts, David, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 39 (6039–6044) 2006
K-theory
Varghese, Mathai, chapter in Encyclopedia of mathematical physics (Elsevier Academic Press) 246–254, 2006
Equivalence of spectral projections in semiclassical limit and a vanishing theorem for higher traces in K-theory
Kordyukov, Y; Varghese, Mathai; Shubin, M, Journal fur die Reine und Angewandte Mathematik 581 (193–236) 2005
M-theory and characteristic classes
Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 8 (020-1–020-8) 2005
Risk-sensitive filtering and smoothing for continuous-time Markov processes
Malcolm, William; Elliott, Robert; James, M, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 51 (1731–1738) 2005
Type II string theory and modularity
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 8 (038-1–038-30) 2005
Type IIB string theory, S-duality, and generalized cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Nuclear Physics B 715 (639–664) 2005
Updating the parameters of a threshold scheme by minimal broadcast
Barwick, Susan; Jackson, Wen-Ai; Martin, K, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 51 (620–633) 2005
A sufficient condition for the uniform exponential stability of time-varying systems with noise
Grammel, G; Maizurna, Isna, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications 56 (951–960) 2004
Geometrical contributions to secret sharing theory
Jackson, Wen-Ai; Martin, K; O'Keefe, Christine, Journal of Geometry 79 (102–133) 2004
Kirillov theory for a class of discrete nilpotent groups
Tandra, Haryono; Moran, W, Canadian Journal of Mathematics-Journal Canadien de Mathematiques 56 (883–896) 2004
M-theory, type IIA superstrings, and elliptic cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 8 (345–394) 2004
Some relations between twisted K-theory and E8 gauge theory
Varghese, Mathai; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 3 (WWW 1–WWW 22) 2004
Subquadrangles of order s of generalized quadrangles of order (s, s2), Part I
Brown, Matthew; Thas, J, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 106 (15–32) 2004
Subquadrangles of order s of generalized quadrangles of order (s, s2), Part II
Brown, Matthew; Thas, J, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 106 (33–48) 2004
Measure Theory and Filtering: Introduction and Applications
Aggoun, L; Elliott, Robert, (Cambridge University Press) 2004
Euler and his contribution to number theory
Glen, Amy; Scott, Paul, Australian Mathematics Teacher 1 (2–5) 2004
Some relations between twisted K-theory and E-8 gauge theory
Mathai, V; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) (WWW1–WWW22) 2004
A general fractional white noise theory and applications to finance
Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, Mathematical Finance 13 (301–330) 2003
Chern character in twisted K-theory: Equivariant and holomorphic cases
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 236 (161–186) 2003
Edge of the wedge theory in hypo-analytic manifolds
Eastwood, Michael; Graham, C, Communications in Partial Differential Equations 28 (2003–2028) 2003
Type-1 D-branes in an H-flux and twisted KO-theory
Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 11 (www 1–www 22) 2003
On a convexity problem arising in queueing theory and electromagnetism
Peake, M; Pearce, Charles, Sixth International Conference on Nonlinear Functional Analysis and Applications, Gyeongsang National University 01/09/00
Axial anomaly and topological charge in lattice gauge theory with overlap dirac operator
Adams, Damian, Annals of Physics 296 (131–151) 2002
Families index theory for Overlap lattice Dirac operator. I
Adams, Damian, Nuclear Physics B 624 (469–484) 2002
Families index theory, gauge fixing, and topology of the space of lattice-gauge fields: a summary
Adams, Damian, Nuclear Physics B-Proceedings Supplements 109A (77–80) 2002
The Andr/Bruck and Bose representation of conics in Baer subplanes of PG(2, q2)
Quinn, Catherine, Journal of Geometry 74 (123–138) 2002
The universal gerbe, Dixmier-Douady class, and gauge theory
Carey, Alan; Mickelsson, J, Letters in Mathematical Physics 59 (47–60) 2002
Twisted K-theory and K-theory of bundle gerbes
Bouwknegt, Pier; Carey, Alan; Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 228 (17–45) 2002
On an extremal problem arising in queueing theory and telecommunications
Peake, M; Pearce, Charles, chapter in Optimization and Related Topics (Kluwer Academic Publishers) 119–134, 2001
On positivity of the Kadison constant and noncommutative Bloch theory
Varghese, Mathai, The Fifth Pacific Rim Geometry Conference, Sendai, Japan 25/07/00
Csiszr f-divergence, Ostrowski's inequality and mutual information
Dragomir, S; Gluscevic, Vido; Pearce, Charles, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications 47 (2375–2386) 2001
Linearised cavity theory with smooth detachment
Haese, Peter, Australian Mathematical Society Gazette 28 (187–193) 2001
On the continuum limit of fermionic topological charge in lattice gauge theory
Adams, David, Journal of Mathematical Physics 42 (5522–5533) 2001
Refinements of some bounds in information theory
Matic, M; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, The ANZIAM Journal 42 (387–398) 2001
Some constructions of small generalized polygons
Polster, Burkhard; Van Maldeghem, H, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 96 (162–179) 2001
Subquadrangles of generalized quadrangles of order (q2, q), q Even
O'Keefe, Christine; Penttila, T, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 94 (218–229) 2001
The modelling and numerical simulation of causal non-linear systems
Howlett, P; Torokhti, Anatoli; Pearce, Charles, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications 47 (5559–5572) 2001
Twisted index theory on good orbifolds, II: Fractional quantum numbers
Marcolli, M; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 217 (55–87) 2001
Introduction to Chern-Simons gauge theory on general 3-manifolds
Adams, David, chapter in Mathematical methods in physics (World Scientific Publishing) 1–43, 2000
Shannon's and related inequalities in information theory
Matic, M; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, chapter in Survey on classical inequalities (Kluwer Academic Publishers) 127–164, 2000
Twistor theory
Murray, Michael, chapter in Geometric approaches to differential equations (Cambridge University Press) 201–223, 2000
A remark of Schwarz's topological field theory
Adams, David; Prodanov, E, Letters in Mathematical Physics 51 (249–255) 2000
Bundle gerbes applied to quantum field theory
Carey, Alan; Mickelsson, J; Murray, Michael, Reviews in Mathematical Physics 12 (65–90) 2000
Bundle gerbes: stable isomorphism and local theory
Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, Journal of the London Mathematical Society 62 (925–937) 2000
D-Branes, B-Fields and twisted K-theory
Bouwknegt, Pier; Varghese, Mathai, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 3 (1–11) 2000
Global obstructions to gauge-invariance in chiral gauge theory on the lattice
Adams, David, Nuclear Physics B 589 (633–656) 2000
Notes on Seiberg-Witten-Floer theory
Carey, Alan; Wang, Bai-Ling, Contemporary Mathematics 258 (71–85) 2000
The Andre/Bruck and Bose representation in PG(2h, q): unitals and Baer subplanes
Barwick, Susan; Casse, Rey; Quinn, Catherine, Bulletin of the Belgian Mathematical Society-Simon Stevin 7 (173–197) 2000

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