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People matching "Mathematics of Risk"

Dr Pedram Hekmati
Adjunct Senior Lecturer


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Professor Michael Murray
Chair of Pure Mathematics


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Associate Professor Yvonne Stokes
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Professor Mathai Varghese
Elder Professor of Mathematics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Scie


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Courses matching "Mathematics of Risk"

Computational Mathematics III

In exploring large scale, complex systems, physicists, engineers, financiers and mathematicians often formulate problems as partial differential equations or many coupled ordinary differential equations. Only rarely can these mathematical models be solved algebraically. Instead computational mathematics derives approximate models that form the basis of computer predictions. Such models predict the climate, the weather, option prices, industrial processes, engineering devices, blood flow, epidemiology and more. This course develops sound stable computational methods for exploring large-scale systems. Topics covered are: the numerical solution and stability of ordinary differential equations, using explicit and implicit methods; finite-difference and spectral methods applied to boundary value problems and certain partial differential equations, including Laplace's equation, the heat equation and the wave equation; stability analysis of these schemes; modern Krylov and multigrid methods are used to solve large systems of linear equations such as those that arise from finite-difference schemes; continuation methods.

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Engineering Mathematics IIA

Mathematical models are used to understand, predict and optimise engineering systems. Many of these systems are deterministic and are modelled using differential equations. Others are random in nature and are analysed using probability theory and statistics. This course provides an introduction to differential equations and their solutions and to probability and statistics, and relates the theory to physical systems and simple real world applications. Topics covered are: Ordinary differential equations, including first and second order equations and series solutions; Fourier series; partial differential equations, including the heat equation, the wave equation, Laplace's equation and separation of variables; probability and statistical methods, including sampling and probability, descriptive statistics, random variables and probability distributions, mean and variance, linear combinations of random variables, statistical inference for means and proportions and linear regression.

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Engineering Mathematics IIB

This course provides an introduction to vector analysis and complex calculus, which is relevant to physics and engineering problems in two or more dimensions, such as solid and fluid mechanics, electromagnetism and thermodynamics. The course also introduces Laplace transform methods for solving differential equations, which have application to engineering problems such as circuit analysis and control. Topics covered are: Vector calculus: vector fields; gradient, divergence and curl; line, surface and volume integrals; integral theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes with applications; orthogonal curvilinear coordinates. Complex analysis: elementary functions of a complex variable; complex differentiation; complex contour integrals; Laurent series; residue theorem. Laplace transforms: transforms of derivatives and integrals; shifting theorems; convolution; applications to differential equations.

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Introduction to Financial Mathematics I

Algebra: Matrices and linear equations. Optimisation problems: solutions by graphical and algebraic methods. Functions and Annuities: linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions; simple and compound interest, annuities and amortization of loans. Continuous rates of change and the derivative.

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Mathematics for Information Technology I

This course provides an introduction to a number of areas of discrete mathematics with wide applicability. Areas of application include: computer logic, analysis of algorithms, telecommunications, gambling and public key cryptography. In addition it introduces a number of fundamental concepts which are useful in Statistics, Computer Science and further studies in Mathematics. Topics covered are: Discrete mathematics: sets, relations, logic, graphs, mathematical induction and difference equations; probability and permutations and combinations; information security and encryption: prime numbers, congruences.

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Mathematics IA

This course together with MATHS 1012 Mathematics IB, provides an introduction to the basic mathematical concepts and techniques of calculus, linear algebra and probability, emphasising their inter-relationships and applications to the financial area; introduces students to the use of computers in mathematics; and develops problem solving skills with both theoretical and practical problems. Topics covered are: Calculus:functions of one variable, differentiation, the definite integral, and techniques of integration. Algebra: Linear equations, matrices, the real vector space determinants, optimisation, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; applications of linear algebra.

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Mathematics IB

This course, together with MATHS 1011 Mathematics IA, provides an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of calculus and linear algebra, emphasising their inter-relationships and applications to engineering, the sciences and financial areas; introduces students to the use of computers in mathematics; and develops problem solving skills with both theoretical and practical problems. Topics covered are: Calculus: Applications of the derivative; functions of two variables; Taylor series; differential equations. Algebra: The real vector space, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations and applications of linear algebra.

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Mathematics IM

This course provides the necessary additional mathematics to prepare students for MATHS 1011 Mathematics IA. The course contains an introduction to basic concepts and techniques of calculus and linear algebra, emphasising their inter-relationships and applications to the sciences and financial areas; introduces students to the use of computers in mathematics; and develops problem solving skills with a particular emphasis on applications. Topics covered are: Calculus: differential calculus with applications; an introduction to differential equations; Algebra: complex numbers; vectors, linear equations and matrices; applications of linear algebra.

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Events matching "Mathematics of Risk"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
Making tertiary mathematics more interesting
15:10 Fri 24 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Emeritus Neville de Mestre, Faculty of Information Technology, Bond University

For the past few decades, calculus and linear algebra have provided the basis for many university courses in mathematics, science or engineering. However there are other courses, which could be given to motivate the students, particularly those with only a passing love of mathematics. One possible course could show the essential features of how mathematicians solve problems using many different analytical, cerebral and computer skills. In this seminar I will describe such a one-semester course (2 lectures, 2 labs each week), which includes hands-on problem solving and students eventually creating their own problems. One or two exciting problems at first-year level will be developed in detail.
Inconsistent Mathematics
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Chris Mortensen

The Theory of Inconsistency arose historically from a number of sources, such as the semantic paradoxes including The Liar and the set-theoretic paradoxes including Russell's. But these sources are rather too closely connected with Foundationalism: the view that mathematics has a foundation such as logic or set theory or category theory etc. It soon became apparent that inconsistent mathematical structures are of interest in their own right and do not depend on the existence of foundations. This paper will survey some of the results in inconsistent mathematics and discuss the bearing on various philosophical positions including Platonism, Logicism, Hilbert's Formalism, and Brouwer's Intuitionism.
Mathematics of underground mining.
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Hyam Rubinstein

Underground mining infrastructure involves an interesting range of optimisation problems with geometric constraints. In particular, ramps, drives and tunnels have gradient within a certain prescribed range and turning circles (curvature) are also bounded. Finally obstacles have to be avoided, such as faults, ore bodies themselves and old workings. A group of mathematicians and engineers at Uni of Melb and Uni of SA have been working on this problem for a number of years. I will summarise what we have found and the challenges of working in the mining industry.
Homological algebra and applications - a historical survey
15:10 Fri 19 May, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Amnon Neeman

Homological algebra is a curious branch of mathematics; it is a powerful tool which has been used in many diverse places, without any clear understanding why it should be so useful. We will give a list of applications, proceeding chronologically: first to topology, then to complex analysis, then to algebraic geometry, then to commutative algebra and finally (if we have time) to non-commutative algebra. At the end of the talk I hope to be able to say something about the part of homological algebra on which I have worked, and its applications. That part is derived categories.
Maths and Movie Making
15:10 Fri 13 Oct, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Michael Anderson

Mathematics underlies many of the techniques used in modern movie making. This talk will sketch out the movie visual effects pipeline, discussing how mathematics is used in the various stages and detailing some of the mathematical areas that are still being actively researched.
The talk will finish with an overview of the type of work the speaker is involved in, the steps that led him there and the opportunities for mathematicians in this new and exciting area.
Flooding in the Sundarbans
15:10 Fri 18 May, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Steve Need

Media...
The Sunderbans is a region of deltaic isles formed in the mouth of the Ganges River on the border between India and Bangladesh. As the largest mangrove forest in the world it is a world heritage site, however it is also home to several remote communities who have long inhabited some regions. Many of the inhabited islands are low-lying and are particularly vulnerable to flooding, a major hazard of living in the region. Determining suitable levels of protection to be provided to these communities relies upon accurate assessment of the flood risk facing these communities. Only recently the Indian Government commissioned a study into flood risk in the Sunderbans with a view to determine where flood protection needed to be upgraded.

Flooding due to rainfall is limited due to the relatively small catchment sizes, so the primary causes of flooding in the Sunderbans are unnaturally high tides, tropical cyclones (which regularly sweep through the bay of Bengal) or some combination of the two. Due to the link between tidal anomaly and drops in local barometric pressure, the two causes of flooding may be highly correlated. I propose stochastic methods for analysing the flood risk and present the early work of a case study which shows the direction of investigation. The strategy involves linking several components; a stochastic approximation to a hydraulic flood routing model, FARIMA and GARCH models for storm surge and a stochastic model for cyclone occurrence and tracking. The methods suggested are general and should have applications in other cyclone affected regions.

Modelling gene networks: the case of the quorum sensing network in bacteria.
15:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Adrian Koerber

The quorum sensing regulatory gene-network is employed by bacteria to provide a measure of their population-density and switch their behaviour accordingly. I will present an overview of quorum sensing in bacteria together with some of the modelling approaches I\'ve taken to describe this system. I will also discuss how this system relates to virulence and medical treatment, and the insights gained from the mathematics.
Div, grad, curl, and all that
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Mike Eastwood :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

These well-known differential operators are, of course, important in applied mathematics. This is just the tip of an iceberg. I shall indicate some of what lies beneath the surface. There are links with topology, physics, symmetry groups, finite element schemes, and more besides. This talk will touch on these different topics by means of examples. Little prior knowledge will be assumed beyond the equality of mixed partial derivatives.
Riemann's Hypothesis
15:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics building University of Adelaide :: Emeritus Prof. E. O. Tuck

Riemann's hypothesis (that all non-trivial zeros of the zeta function have real part one-half) is the most famous currently unproved conjecture in mathematics, and a \\$1M prize awaits its proof. The mathematical statement of this problem is only at about second-year undergraduate level; after all, the zeta function is much like the trigonometric sine function, and all (?) second-year students know that all zeros of the sine function are (real) integer multiples of $\\pi$. Many of the steps apparently needed to make progress on the proof are also not much more complicated than that level. Some of these elementary steps, together with numerical explorations, will be described here. Nevertheless the Riemann hypothesis has defied proof so far, and very complicated and advanced abstract mathematics (that will NOT be described here) is often brought to bear on it. Does it need abstract mathematics, or just a flash of elementary inspiration?
Regression: a backwards step?
13:10 Fri 7 Sep, 2007 :: Maths G08 :: Dr Gary Glonek

Media...
Most students of high school mathematics will have encountered the technique of fitting a line to data by least squares. Those who have taken a university statistics course will also have heard this method referred to as regression. However, it is not obvious from common dictionary definitions why this should be the case. For example, "reversion to an earlier or less advanced state or form". In this talk, the mathematical phenomenon that gave regression its name will be explained and will be shown to have implications in some unexpected contexts.
The Linear Algebra of Internet Search Engines
15:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Lesley Ward :: School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of South Australia

We often want to search the web for information on a given topic. Early web-search algorithms worked by counting up the number of times the words in a query topic appeared on each webpage. If the topic words appeared often on a given page, that page was ranked highly as a source of information on that topic. More recent algorithms rely on Link Analysis. People make judgments about how useful a given page is for a given topic, and they express these judgments through the hyperlinks they choose to put on their own webpages. Link-analysis algorithms aim to mine the collective wisdom encoded in the resulting network of links. I will discuss the linear algebra that forms the common underpinning of three link-analysis algorithms for web search. I will also present some work on refining one such algorithm, Kleinberg's HITS algorithm. This is joint work with Joel Miller, Greg Rae, Fred Schaefer, Ayman Farahat, Tom LoFaro, Tracy Powell, Estelle Basor, and Kent Morrison. It originated in a Mathematics Clinic project at Harvey Mudd College.
Groundwater: using mathematics to solve our water crisis
13:10 Wed 9 Apr, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Michael Teubner

'The driest state in the driest continent' is how South Australia used to be described. And that was before the drought! Now we have severe water restrictions, dead lawns, and dying gardens. But this need not be the case. Mathematics to the rescue! Groundwater exists below much of the Adelaide metro area. We can store winter stormwater in the ground and use it when we need it in summer. But we need mathematical models to understand where groundwater exists, where we can inject stormwater and how much can be stored, and where we can extract it: all through mathematical models. Come along and see that we don't have a water problem, we have a water management problem.
The Mathematics of String Theory
15:10 Fri 2 May, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Peter Bouwknegt :: Department of Mathematics, ANU

String Theory has had, and continues to have, a profound impact on many areas of mathematics and vice versa. In this talk I want to address some relatively recent developments. In particular I will argue, following Witten and others, that D-brane charges take values in the K-theory of spacetime, rather than in integral cohomology as one might have expected. I will also explore the mathematical consequences of a particular symmetry, called T-duality, in this context. I will give an intuitive introduction into D-branes and K-theory. No prior knowledge about either String Theory, D-branes or K-theory is required.
The limits of proof
13:10 Wed 21 May, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson

Media...
The job of the mathematician is to discover new truths about mathematical objects and their relationships. Such truths are established by proving them. This raises a fundamental question. Can every mathematical truth be proved (by a sufficiently clever being) or are there truths that will forever lie beyond the reach of proof? Mathematics can be turned on itself to investigate this question. In this talk, we will see that under certain assumptions about proofs, there are truths that cannot be proved. You must decide for yourself whether you think these assumptions are valid!
Puzzle-based learning: Introduction to mathematics
15:10 Fri 23 May, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Zbigniew Michalewicz :: School of Computer Science, University of Adelaide

Media...
The talk addresses a gap in the educational curriculum for 1st year students by proposing a new course that aims at getting students to think about how to frame and solve unstructured problems. The idea is to increase the student's mathematical awareness and problem-solving skills by discussing a variety of puzzles. The talk makes an argument that this approach - called Puzzle-Based Learning - is very beneficial for introducing mathematics, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

The new course has been approved by the University of Adelaide for Faculty of Engineering, Computer Science, and Mathematics. Many other universities are in the process of introducing such a course. The course will be offered in two versions: (a) full-semester course and (b) a unit within general course (e.g. Introduction to Engineering). All teaching materials (power point slides, assignments, etc.) are being prepared. The new textbook (Puzzle-Based Learning: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Mathematics, and Problem Solving) will be available from June 2008. The talk provides additional information on this development.

For further information see http://www.PuzzleBasedlearning.edu.au/

Betti's Reciprocal Theorem for Inclusion and Contact Problems
15:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Enrico Betti (1823-1892) is recognized in the mathematics community for his pioneering contributions to topology. An equally important contribution is his formulation of the reciprocity theorem applicable to elastic bodies that satisfy the classical equations of linear elasticity. Although James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) proposed a law of reciprocal displacements and rotations in 1864, the contribution of Betti is acknowledged for its underlying formal mathematical basis and generality. The purpose of this lecture is to illustrate how Betti's reciprocal theorem can be used to full advantage to develop compact analytical results for certain contact and inclusion problems in the classical theory of elasticity. Inclusion problems are encountered in number of areas in applied mechanics ranging from composite materials to geomechanics. In composite materials, the inclusion represents an inhomogeneity that is introduced to increase either the strength or the deformability characteristics of resulting material. In geomechanics, the inclusion represents a constructed material region, such as a ground anchor, that is introduced to provide load transfer from structural systems. Similarly, contact problems have applications to the modelling of the behaviour of indentors used in materials testing to the study of foundations used to distribute loads transmitted from structures. In the study of conventional problems the inclusions and the contact regions are directly loaded and this makes their analysis quite straightforward. When the interaction is induced by loads that are placed exterior to the indentor or inclusion, the direct analysis of the problem becomes inordinately complicated both in terns of formulation of the integral equations and their numerical solution. It is shown by a set of selected examples that the application of Betti's reciprocal theorem leads to the development of exact closed form solutions to what would otherwise be approximate solutions achievable only through the numerical solution of a set of coupled integral equations.
Something cool about primes
13:10 Wed 13 Aug, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: Mr David Butler

So far this year in the undergraduate seminars, we have seen how mathematics is useful for solving important problems, and how mathematics can be used to uncover profound truths. In this seminar I will show you something about prime numbers that is neither useful nor profound. I just think it is extremely cool.
Mathematical modelling of blood flow in curved arteries
15:10 Fri 12 Sep, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Jennifer Siggers :: Imperial College London

Atherosclerosis, characterised by plaques, is the most common arterial disease. Plaques tend to develop in regions of low mean wall shear stress, and regions where the wall shear stress changes direction during the course of the cardiac cycle. To investigate the effect of the arterial geometry and driving pressure gradient on the wall shear stress distribution we consider an idealised model of a curved artery with uniform curvature. We assume that the flow is fully-developed and seek solutions of the governing equations, finding the effect of the parameters on the flow and wall shear stress distribution. Most previous work assumes the curvature ratio is asymptotically small; however, many arteries have significant curvature (e.g. the aortic arch has curvature ratio approx 0.25), and in this work we consider in particular the effect of finite curvature.

We present an extensive analysis of curved-pipe flow driven by a steady and unsteady pressure gradients. Increasing the curvature causes the shear stress on the inside of the bend to rise, indicating that the risk of plaque development would be overestimated by considering only the weak curvature limit.

Unsolvable problems in mathematics
15:10 Fri 3 Jul, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Greg Hjorth :: University of Melbourne

In the 1900 International Congress of Mathematicians David Hilbert proposed a list of 23 landmark mathematical problems. The first of these problems was shown by Paul Cohen in 1963 to be undecidable—which is to say, in informal language, that it was in principle completely unsolvable. The tenth problem was shown by Yuri Matiyasevich to be unsolvable in 1970. These developments would very likely have been profoundly surprising, perhaps even disturbing, to Hilbert. I want to review some of the general history of unsolvable problems. As much as reasonably possible in the time allowed, I hope to give the audience a sense of why the appearance of unsolvable problems in mathematics was inevitable, and perhaps even desirable.
From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
The Monster
12:10 Thu 10 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Dr David Parrott :: University of Adelaide

Media...
The simple groups are the building blocks of all finite groups. The classification of finite simple groups is a towering achievement of 20th century mathematics. In addition to 18 infinite families of finite simple groups, there are 26 sporadic groups. The biggest sporadic group, dubbed The Monster, has about 10^54 elements. The talk will give a glimpse of this deep area of mathematics.
Understanding hypersurfaces through tropical geometry
12:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Dr Mohammed Abouzaid :: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Given a polynomial in two or more variables, one may study the zero locus from the point of view of different mathematical subjects (number theory, algebraic geometry, ...). I will explain how tropical geometry allows to encode all topological aspects by elementary combinatorial objects called "tropical varieties." Mohammed Abouzaid received a B.S. in 2002 from the University of Richmond, and a Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Chicago under the supervision of Paul Seidel. He is interested in symplectic topology and its interactions with algebraic geometry and differential topology, in particular the homological mirror symmetry conjecture. Since 2007 he has been a postdoctoral fellow at MIT, and a Clay Mathematics Institute Research Fellow.
Stable commutator length
13:40 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Danny Calegari :: California Institute of Technology

Stable commutator length answers the question: "what is the simplest surface in a given space with prescribed boundary?" where "simplest" is interpreted in topological terms. This topological definition is complemented by several equivalent definitions - in group theory, as a measure of non-commutativity of a group; and in linear programming, as the solution of a certain linear optimization problem. On the topological side, scl is concerned with questions such as computing the genus of a knot, or finding the simplest 4-manifold that bounds a given 3-manifold. On the linear programming side, scl is measured in terms of certain functions called quasimorphisms, which arise from hyperbolic geometry (negative curvature) and symplectic geometry (causal structures). In these talks we will discuss how scl in free and surface groups is connected to such diverse phenomena as the existence of closed surface subgroups in graphs of groups, rigidity and discreteness of symplectic representations, bounding immersed curves on a surface by immersed subsurfaces, and the theory of multi- dimensional continued fractions and Klein polyhedra. Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory. He received a B.A. in 1994 from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley under the joint supervision of Andrew Casson and William Thurston. From 2000 to 2002 he was Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University, after which he joined the Caltech faculty; he became Richard Merkin Professor in 2007.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Buildings
15:10 Fri 9 Oct, 2009 :: MacBeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Guyan Robertson :: University of Newcastle, UK

Buildings were created by J. Tits in order to give a systematic geometric interpretation of simple Lie groups (and of simple algebraic groups). Buildings have since found applications in many areas of mathematics. This talk will give an informal introduction to these beautiful objects.
Is the price really right?
12:10 Thu 22 Oct, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Mr Sam Cohen :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Making decisions when outcomes are uncertain is a common problem we all face. In this talk I will outline some recent developments on this question from the mathematics of finance-the theory of risk measures and nonlinear expectations. I will also talk about how decisions are currently made in the finance industry, and how some simple mathematics can show where these systems are open to abuse.
Finite and infinite words in number theory
15:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Amy Glen :: Murdoch University

A 'word' is a finite or infinite sequence of symbols (called 'letters') taken from a finite non-empty set (called an 'alphabet'). In mathematics, words naturally arise when one wants to represent elements from some set (e.g., integers, real numbers, p-adic numbers, etc.) in a systematic way. For instance, expansions in integer bases (such as binary and decimal expansions) or continued fraction expansions allow us to associate with every real number a unique finite or infinite sequence of digits.

In this talk, I will discuss some old and new results in Combinatorics on Words and their applications to problems in Number Theory. In particular, by transforming inequalities between real numbers into (lexicographic) inequalities between infinite words representing their binary expansions, I will show how combinatorial properties of words can be used to completely describe the minimal intervals containing all fractional parts {x*2^n}, for some positive real number x, and for all non-negative integers n. This is joint work with Jean-Paul Allouche (Universite Paris-Sud, France).

The exceptional Lie group G_2 and rolling balls
15:10 Fri 19 Feb, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Pawel Nurowski :: University of Warsaw

In this talk, after a brief history of how the exceptional Lie group G_2 was discovered, I present various appearances of this group in mathematics. Its physical realisation as a symmetry group of a simple mechanical system will also be discussed.
Exploratory experimentation and computation
15:10 Fri 16 Apr, 2010 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Jonathan Borwein :: University of Newcastle

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The mathematical research community is facing a great challenge to re-evaluate the role of proof in light of the growing power of current computer systems, of modern mathematical computing packages, and of the growing capacity to data-mine on the Internet. Add to that the enormous complexity of many modern capstone results such as the Poincare conjecture, Fermat's last theorem, and the Classification of finite simple groups. As the need and prospects for inductive mathematics blossom, the requirement to ensure the role of proof is properly founded remains undiminished. I shall look at the philosophical context with examples and then offer some of five bench-marking examples of the opportunities and challenges we face.
"The Emperor's New Mind": computers, minds, physics and biology
11:10 Wed 21 Apr, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: Prof Tony Roberts :: University of Adelaide

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In the mid-1990s the computer 'Deep Blue' beat Kasparov, the world chess champion. Will computers soon overtake us humans in other endeavours of intelligence? Roger Penrose's thesis is that human intelligence is far more subtle than has previously been imagined, that the quest for human-like artificial intelligence in computers, the holy grail of artificial intelligence, is hopeless. The argument ranges from icily clear mathematics of computation, through the amazing shadows of quantum physics, and thence to new conjectures in biology.
Spot the difference: how to tell when two things are the same (and when they're not!)
13:10 Wed 19 May, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

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High on a mathematician's to-do list is classifying objects and structures that arise in mathematics. We see patterns in things and want to know what other sorts of things behave similarly. This poses several problems. How can you tell when two seemingly different mathematical objects are the same? Can you even tell when two seemingly similar mathematical objects are the same? In fact, what does "the same" even mean? How can you tell if two things are the same when you can't even see them! In this talk, we will take a walk through some areas of maths known as algebraic topology and category theory and I will show you some of the ways mathematicians have devised to tell when two things are "the same".
The mathematics of theoretical inference in cognitive psychology
15:10 Fri 11 Jun, 2010 :: Napier LG24 :: Prof John Dunn :: University of Adelaide

The aim of psychology in general, and of cognitive psychology in particular, is to construct theoretical accounts of mental processes based on observed changes in performance on one or more cognitive tasks. The fundamental problem faced by the researcher is that these mental processes are not directly observable but must be inferred from changes in performance between different experimental conditions. This inference is further complicated by the fact that performance measures may only be monotonically related to the underlying psychological constructs. State-trace analysis provides an approach to this problem which has gained increasing interest in recent years. In this talk, I explain state-trace analysis and discuss the set of mathematical issues that flow from it. Principal among these are the challenges of statistical inference and an unexpected connection to the mathematics of oriented matroids.
Counting lattice points in polytopes and geometry
15:10 Fri 6 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Dr Paul Norbury :: University of Melbourne

Counting lattice points in polytopes arises in many areas of pure and applied mathematics. A basic counting problem is this: how many different ways can one give change of 1 dollar into 5,10, 20 and 50 cent coins? This problem counts lattice points in a tetrahedron, and if there also must be exactly 10 coins then it counts lattice points in a triangle. The number of lattice points in polytopes can be used to measure the robustness of a computer network, or in statistics to test independence of characteristics of samples. I will describe the general structure of lattice point counts and the difficulty of calculations. I will then describe a particular lattice point count in which the structure simplifies considerably allowing one to calculate easily. I will spend a brief time at the end describing how this is related to the moduli space of Riemann surfaces.
Index theory in Mathematics and Physics
15:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

This lecture is a personal (and partly historical) overview in non-technical terms of the topic described in the title, from first year linear algebra to von Neumann algebras.
Triangles, maps and curvature
13:10 Wed 8 Sep, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

Euclidean space is flat but the real world is curved. This causes lots of problems for sailors, surveyors, mapmakers, and even geometers. In the talk I will explain how the notion of curvature evolved in mathematics starting off from practical applications such as geodesy and cartography and yielding less practical applications in modern physics.
Totally disconnected, locally compact groups
15:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

Locally compact groups occur in many branches of mathematics. Their study falls into two cases: connected groups, which occur as automorphisms of smooth structures such as spheres for example; and totally disconnected groups, which occur as automorphisms of discrete structures such as trees. The talk will give an overview of the currently developing structure theory of totally disconnected locally compact groups. Techniques for analysing totally disconnected groups will be described that correspond to the familiar Lie group methods used to treat connected groups. These techniques played an essential role in the recent solution of a problem raised by R. Zimmer and G. Margulis concerning commensurated subgroups of arithmetic groups.
The mathematics of smell
15:10 Wed 29 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Michael Borgas :: CSIRO Light Metals Flagship; Marine and Atmospheric Research; Centre for Australian Weather and Clim

The sense of smell is important in nature, but the least well understood of our senses. A mathematical model of smell, which combines the transmission of volatile-organic-compound chemical signals (VOCs) on the wind, transduced by olfactory receptors in our noses into neural information, and assembled into our odour perception, is useful. Applications include regulations for odour nuisance, like German VDI protocols for calibrated noses, to the design of modern chemical sensors for extracting information from the environment and even for the perfume industry. This talk gives a broad overview of turbulent mixing in surface layers of the atmosphere, measurements of VOCs with PTR-MS (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers), our noses, and integrated environmental models of the Alumina industry (a source of odour emissions) to help understand the science of smell.
How are weather forecasts made?... and what role does mathematics play?
12:10 Mon 7 Mar, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mika Peace :: University of Adelaide

Have you ever wondered where the weather forecast for the next seven days comes from? Come and find out! We will look at the basic laws of meteorology, leading in to the primitive equations, which are solved on supercomputers to produce the weather forecasts we see every day. We will finish by using the current numerical weather prediction charts to forecast our weather for the next few days.
To which extent the model of Black-Scholes can be applied in the financial market?
12:10 Mon 21 Mar, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

Black and Scholes have introduced a new approach to model the stock price dynamics about three decades ago. The so called Black Scholes model seems to be very adapted to the nature of market prices, mainly because the usage of the Brownian motion and the mathematical properties that follow from. Like every theoretical model, put in practice, it does not appear to be flawless, that means that new adaptations and extensions should be made so that engineers and marketers could utilise the Black Scholes models to trade and hedge risk on the market. A more detailed description with application will be given in the talk.
Nanotechnology: The mathematics of gas storage in metal-organic frameworks.
12:10 Mon 28 Mar, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Wei Xian Lim :: University of Adelaide

Have you thought about what sort of car you would be driving in the future? Would it be a hybrid, solar, hydrogen or electric car? I would like to be driving a hydrogen car because my field of research may aid in their development! In my presentation I will introduce you to the world of metal-organic frameworks, which are an exciting new class of materials that have great potential in applications such as hydrogen gas storage. I will also discuss about the mathematical model that I am using to model the performance of metal-organic frameworks based on beryllium.
Modelling of Hydrological Persistence in the Murray-Darling Basin for the Management of Weirs
12:10 Mon 4 Apr, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Aiden Fisher :: University of Adelaide

The lakes and weirs along the lower Murray River in Australia are aggregated and considered as a sequence of five reservoirs. A seasonal Markov chain model for the system will be implemented, and a stochastic dynamic program will be used to find optimal release strategies, in terms of expected monetary value (EMV), for the competing demands on the water resource given the stochastic nature of inflows. Matrix analytic methods will be used to analyse the system further, and in particular enable the full distribution of first passage times between any groups of states to be calculated. The full distribution of first passage times can be used to provide a measure of the risk associated with optimum EMV strategies, such as conditional value at risk (CVaR). The sensitivity of the model, and risk, to changing rainfall scenarios will be investigated. The effect of decreasing the level of discretisation of the reservoirs will be explored. Also, the use of matrix analytic methods facilitates the use of hidden states to allow for hydrological persistence in the inflows. Evidence for hydrological persistence of inflows to the lower Murray system, and the effect of making allowance for this, will be discussed.
How to value risk
12:10 Mon 11 Apr, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Leo Shen :: University of Adelaide

A key question in mathematical finance is: given a future random payoff X, what is its value today? If X represents a loss, one can ask how risky is X. To mitigate risk it must be modelled and quantified. The finance industry has used Value-at-Risk and conditional Value-at-Risk as measures. However, these measures are not time consistent and Value-at-Risk can penalize diversification. A modern theory of risk measures is being developed which is related to solutions of backward stochastic differential equations in continuous time and stochastic difference equations in discrete time. I first review risk measures used in mathematical finance, including static and dynamic risk measures. I recall results relating to backward stochastic difference equations (BSDEs) associated with a single jump process. Then I evaluate some numerical examples of the solutions of the backward stochastic difference equations and related risk measures. These concepts are new. I hope the examples will indicate how they might be used.
Why is a pure mathematician working in biology?
15:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 lecture theatre :: Associate Prof Andrew Francis :: University of Western Sydney

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A pure mathematician working in biology should be a contradiction in terms. In this talk I will describe how I became interested in working in biology, coming from an algebraic background. I will also describe some areas of evolutionary biology that may benefit from an algebraic approach. Finally, if time permits I will reflect on the sometimes difficult distinction between pure and applied mathematics, and perhaps venture some thoughts on mathematical research in general.
When statistics meets bioinformatics
12:10 Wed 11 May, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Prof Patty Solomon :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Bioinformatics is a new field of research which encompasses mathematics, computer science, biology, medicine and the physical sciences. It has arisen from the need to handle and analyse the vast amounts of data being generated by the new genomics technologies. The interface of these disciplines used to be information-poor, but is now information-mega-rich, and statistics plays a central role in processing this information and making it intelligible. In this talk, I will describe a published bioinformatics study which claimed to have developed a simple test for the early detection of ovarian cancer from a blood sample. The US Food and Drug Administration was on the verge of approving the test kits for market in 2004 when demonstrated flaws in the study design and analysis led to its withdrawal. We are still waiting for an effective early biomarker test for ovarian cancer.
The Extended-Domain-Eigenfunction Method: making old mathematics work for new problems
15:10 Fri 13 May, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Stan Miklavcic :: University of South Australia

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Standard analytical solutions to elliptic boundary value problems on asymmetric domains are rarely, if ever, obtainable. Several years ago I proposed a solution technique to cope with such complicated domains. It involves the embedding of the original domain into one with simple boundaries where the classical eigenfunction solution approach can be used. The solution in the larger domain, when restricted to the original domain is then the solution of the original boundary value problem. In this talk I will present supporting theory for this idea, some numerical results for the particular case of the Laplace equation and the Stokes flow equations in two-dimensions and discuss advantages and limitations of the proposal.
Statistical challenges in molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 lecture theatre :: Dr Barbara Holland :: University of Tasmania

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This talk will give an introduction to the ways that mathematics and statistics gets used in the inference of evolutionary (phylogenetic) trees. Taking a model-based approach to estimating the relationships between species has proven to be an enormously effective, however, there are some tricky statistical challenges that remain. The increasingly plentiful amount of DNA sequence data is a boon, but it is also throwing a spotlight on some of the shortcomings of current best practice particularly in how we (1) assess the reliability of our phylogenetic estimates, and (2) how we choose appropriate models. This talk will aim to give a general introduction this area of research and will also highlight some results from two of my recent PhD students.
Statistical modelling in economic forecasting: semi-parametrically spatio-temporal approach
12:10 Mon 23 May, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dawlah Alsulami :: University of Adelaide

How to model spatio-temporal variation of housing prices is an important and challenging problem as it is of vital importance for both investors and policy makersto assess any movement in housing prices. In this seminar I will talk about the proposed model to estimate any movement in housing prices and measure the risk more accurately.
Permeability of heterogeneous porous media - experiments, mathematics and computations
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2011 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Permeability is a key parameter important to a variety of applications in geological engineering and in the environmental geosciences. The conventional definition of Darcy flow enables the estimation of permeability at different levels of detail. This lecture will focus on the measurement of surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone, using a surface permeameter. The paper discusses the theoretical developments, the solution of the resulting triple integral equations and associated computational treatments that enable the mapping of the near surface permeability of the cuboidal region. This data combined with a kriging procedure is used to develop results for the permeability distribution at the interior of the cuboidal region. Upon verification of the absence of dominant pathways for fluid flow through the cuboidal region, estimates are obtained for the "Effective Permeability" of the cuboid using estimates proposed by Wiener, Landau and Lifschitz, King, Matheron, Journel et al., Dagan and others. The results of these estimates are compared with the geometric mean, derived form the computational estimates.
From group action to Kontsevich's Swiss-Cheese conjecture through categorification
15:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

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The Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture is a deep generalization of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains which plays an important role in the deformation quantization theory. Categorification is a method of thinking about mathematics by replacing set theoretical concepts by some higher dimensional objects. Categorification is somewhat of an art because there is no exact recipe for doing this. It is, however, a very powerful method of understanding (and producing) many deep results starting from simple facts we learned as undergraduate students. In my talk I will explain how Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture can be easily understood as a special case of categorification of a very familiar statement: an action of a group G (more generally, a monoid) on a set X is the same as group homomorphism from G to the group of automorphisms of X (monoid of endomorphisms of X in the case of a monoid action).
Probability density estimation by diffusion
15:10 Fri 10 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Dirk Kroese :: University of Queensland

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One of the beautiful aspects of Mathematics is that seemingly disparate areas can often have deep connections. This talk is about the fundamental connection between probability density estimation, diffusion processes, and partial differential equations. Specifically, we show how to obtain efficient probability density estimators by solving partial differential equations related to diffusion processes. This new perspective leads, in combination with Fast Fourier techniques, to very fast and accurate algorithms for density estimation. Moreover, the diffusion formulation unifies most of the existing adaptive smoothing algorithms and provides a natural solution to the boundary bias of classical kernel density estimators. This talk covers topics in Statistics, Probability, Applied Mathematics, and Numerical Mathematics, with a surprise appearance of the theta function. This is joint work with Zdravko Botev and Joe Grotowski.
Object oriented data analysis
14:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Object Oriented Data Analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of Functional Data Analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal components analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie Groups and Symmetric Spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for Object Oriented Data Analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. Even in situations where Euclidean analysis makes sense, there are statistical challenges because of the High Dimension Low Sample Size problem, which motivates a new type of asymptotics leading to non-standard mathematical statistics.
Heads of Mathematics
12:00 Thu 7 Jul, 2011 :: N132 Engineering North :: School outreach event

This collaboration with MASA is aimed at high school teachers of mathematics. A mixture of workshops, lectures and discussion sessions is given to expose the teachers to new ideas for teaching mathematics.
The Selberg integral
15:10 Fri 5 Aug, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ole Warnaar :: University of Queensland

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In this talk I will give a gentle introduction to the mathematics surrounding the Selberg integral. Selberg's integral, which first appeared in two rather unusual papers by Atle Selberg in the 1940s, has become famous as much for its association with (other) mathematical greats such as Enrico Bombieri and Freeman Dyson as for its importance in algebra (Coxeter groups), geometry (hyperplane arrangements) and number theory (the Riemann hypothesis). In this talk I will review the remarkable history of the Selberg integral and discuss some of its early applications. Time permitting I will end the talk by describing some of my own, ongoing work on Selberg integrals related to Lie algebras.
Textbooks go interactive but are they any better?
12:10 Mon 15 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Patrick Korbel :: University of Adelaide

Textbooks remain a central part of mathematics lessons in secondary schools. However, while textbooks are still formatted in the traditional way, they are including increasingly more sophisticated software packages to assist teachers and students. I will be demonstrating the different software packages available to students included with two South Australian textbooks. I will talk about how these new features fit into the current classroom environment and some of their potential positives and negatives. I would also like to encourage people to share their own experiences with textbooks, especially if they were used in a novel way or you have experience of mathematics classes in another country.
MiS information night
16:00 Tue 23 Aug, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli

Mathematicians in Schools (MiS) is a CSIRO-supported endeavour that entails partnerships between mathematicians and high-schools. This relationship helps promote mathematics to high-school students. The MiS information night will consist of participants in established partnerships discussing their experiences and also an opportunity to ask about future participation.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
10:00 Mon 5 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli

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Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage.
Can statisticians do better than random guessing?
12:10 Tue 20 Sep, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Inge Koch :: School of Mathematical Sciences

In the finance or credit risk area, a bank may want to assess whether a client is going to default, or be able to meet the repayments. In the assessment of benign or malignant tumours, a correct diagnosis is required. In these and similar examples, we make decisions based on data. The classical t-tests provide a tool for making such decisions. However, many modern data sets have more variables than observations, and the classical rules may not be any better than random guessing. We consider Fisher's rule for classifying data into two groups, and show that it can break down for high-dimensional data. We then look at ways of overcoming some of the weaknesses of the classical rules, and I show how these "post-modern" rules perform in practice.
Estimating transmission parameters for the swine flu pandemic
15:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Kathryn Glass :: Australian National University

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Following the onset of a new strain of influenza with pandemic potential, policy makers need specific advice on how fast the disease is spreading, who is at risk, and what interventions are appropriate for slowing transmission. Mathematical models play a key role in comparing interventions and identifying the best response, but models are only as good as the data that inform them. In the early stages of the 2009 swine flu outbreak, many researchers estimated transmission parameters - particularly the reproduction number - from outbreak data. These estimates varied, and were often biased by data collection methods, misclassification of imported cases or as a result of early stochasticity in case numbers. I will discuss a number of the pitfalls in achieving good quality parameter estimates from early outbreak data, and outline how best to avoid them. One of the early indications from swine flu data was that children were disproportionately responsible for disease spread. I will introduce a new method for estimating age-specific transmission parameters from both outbreak and seroprevalence data. This approach allows us to take account of empirical data on human contact patterns, and highlights the need to allow for asymmetric mixing matrices in modelling disease transmission between age groups. Applied to swine flu data from a number of different countries, it presents a consistent picture of higher transmission from children.
Mathematical opportunities in molecular space
15:10 Fri 28 Oct, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Aaron Thornton :: CSIRO

The study of molecular motion, interaction and space at the nanoscale has become a powerful tool in the area of gas separation, storage and conversion for efficient energy solutions. Modeling in this field has typically involved highly iterative computational algorithms such as molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics. Mathematical formulae in the form of analytical solutions to this field offer a range of useful and insightful advantages including optimization, bifurcation analysis and standardization. Here we present a few case scenarios where mathematics has provided insight and opportunities for further investigation.
Quasimodo's Cipher
15:10 Fri 4 Nov, 2011 :: Room change: Horace Lamb lecture theatre :: Dr Burkard Polster :: Monash University

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I thought to see the fairies in the fields, but I saw only the evil elephants with their black backs. Woe! How that sight awed me! The elves danced all around and about while I heard voices calling clearly.... Puzzled? Curious? Come and join in the chase for the key to this cipher message, learn about the beautiful mathematics underlying the ancient art of ringing the changes, and find out what all this has to do with juggling.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
Forecasting electricity demand distributions using a semiparametric additive model
15:10 Fri 16 Mar, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Rob Hyndman :: Monash University

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Electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in short-term load allocation and long-term planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. Planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels, therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. Electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. I will describe a comprehensive forecasting solution designed to take all the available information into account, and to provide forecast distributions from a few hours ahead to a few decades ahead. We use semi-parametric additive models to estimate the relationships between demand and the covariates, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then we forecast the demand distributions using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The model is being used by the state energy market operators and some electricity supply companies to forecast the probability distribution of electricity demand in various regions of Australia. It also underpinned the Victorian Vision 2030 energy strategy.
Fluid mechanics: what's maths got to do with it?
13:10 Tue 20 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Jim Denier :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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We've all heard about the grand challenges in mathematics. There was the Poincare Conjecture, which has now been resolved. There is the Riemann Hypothesis which many are seeking to prove. But one of the most intriguing is the so called "Navier-Stokes Equations" problem, intriguing because it not only involves some wickedly difficult mathematics but also involves questions about our deep understanding of nature as encountered in the flow of fluids. This talk will introduce the problem (without the wickedly difficult mathematics) and discuss some of the consequences of its resolution.
Financial risk measures - the theory and applications of backward stochastic difference/differential equations with respect to the single jump process
12:10 Mon 26 Mar, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Bin Shen :: University of Adelaide

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This is my PhD thesis submitted one month ago. Chapter 1 introduces the backgrounds of the research fields. Then each chapter is a published or an accepted paper. Chapter 2, to appear in Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Difference Equations with respect to the single jump process in discrete time. Chapter 3, published in Stochastic Analysis and Applications, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Differential Equations with respect to the single jump process in continuous time. Chapter 2 and 3 consist of Part I Theory. Chapter 4, published in Expert Systems With Applications, gives some examples about how to measure financial risks by the theory established in Chapter 2. Chapter 5, accepted by Journal of Applied Probability, considers the question of an optimal transaction between two investors to minimize their risks. It's the applications of the theory established in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 and 5 consist of Part II Applications.
Index type invariants for twisted signature complexes
13:10 Fri 11 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Atiyah-Patodi-Singer proved an index theorem for non-local boundary conditions in the 1970's that has been widely used in mathematics and mathematical physics. A key application of their theory gives the index theorem for signature operators on oriented manifolds with boundary. As a consequence, they defined certain secondary invariants that were metric independent. I will discuss some recent work with Benameur where we extend the APS theory to signature operators twisted by an odd degree closed differential form, and study the corresponding secondary invariants.
The classification of Dynkin diagrams
12:10 Mon 21 May, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

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The idea of continuous symmetry is often described in mathematics via Lie groups. These groups can be classified by their root systems: collections of vectors satisfying certain symmetry properties. The root systems are described in a concise way by Dynkin diagrams, and it turns out, roughly speaking, that there are only seven possible shapes for a Dynkin diagram. In this talk I'll describe some simple examples of Lie groups, explain what a root system is, and show how a Dynkin diagram encodes this information. Then I'll give a very brief sketch of the methods used to classify Dynkin diagrams.
The change of probability measure for jump processes
12:10 Mon 28 May, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

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In financial derivatives pricing theory, it is very common to change the probability measure from historical measure "real world" into a Risk-Neutral measure as a development of the non arbitrage condition. Girsanov theorem is the most known example of this technique and is used when prices randomness is modelled by Brownian motions. Other genuine candidates for modelling market randomness that have proved efficiency in recent literature are jump process, so how can a change of measure be performed for such processes? This talk will address this question by introducing the non arbitrage condition, discussing Girsanov theorem for diffusion and jump processes and presenting a concrete example.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
Inquiry-based learning: yesterday and today
15:30 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Ron Douglas :: Texas A&M University

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The speaker will report on a project to develop and promote approaches to mathematics instruction closely related to the Moore method -- methods which are called inquiry-based learning -- as well as on his personal experience of the Moore method. For background, see the speaker's article in the May 2012 issue of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society. To download the article, click on "Media" above.
The Four Colour Theorem
11:10 Mon 23 Jul, 2012 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Vincent Schlegel :: University of Adelaide

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Arguably the most famous problem in discrete mathematics, the Four Colour Theorem was first conjectured in 1852 by South African mathematician Francis Guthrie. For 124 years, it defied many attempts to prove and disprove it. I will talk briefly about some of the rich history of this result, including some of the graph-theoretic techniques used in the 1976 Appel-Haken proof.
Boundary-layer transition and separation over asymmetrically textured spherical surfaces
12:30 Mon 27 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Adam Tunney :: University of Adelaide

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The game of cricket is unique among ball sports by the ignorant exploitation of \thetitle in the practice of swing bowling, often referred to as a "mysterious art". I will talk a bit about the Magnus effect exploited in inferior sports, the properties of a cricket ball that allow swing bowling, and the explanation of three modes of swing (conventional, contrast and reverse). Following that there will be some discussion on how I plan to use mathematics to turn this "art" into science.
Examples of counterexamples
13:10 Tue 4 Sep, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Pedram Hekmati :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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This aims to be an example of an exemplary talk on examples of celebrated counterexamples in mathematics. A famous example, for example, is Euler's counterexample to Fermat's conjecture in number theory.
Knot Theory
12:10 Mon 10 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Konrad Pilch :: University of Adelaide

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The ancient Chinese used it, the Celts had this skill in spades, it was a big skill of seafarers and pirates, and even now we need it if only to be able to wear shoes! This talk will be about Knot Theory. Knot theory has a colourful and interesting past and I will touch on the why, the what and the when of knots in mathematics. I shall also discuss the major problems concerning knots including the different methods of classification of knots, the unresolved questions about knots, and why have they even been studied. It will be a thorough immersion that will leave you knotted!
Quantisation commutes with reduction
15:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University Hannover

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The "Quantisation commutes with reduction" principle is an idea from physics, which has powerful applications in mathematics. It basically states that the ways in which symmetry can be used to simplify a physical system in classical and quantum mechanics, are compatible. This provides a strong link between the areas in mathematics used to describe symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics: symplectic geometry and representation theory, respectively. It has been proved in the 1990s that quantisation indeed commutes with reduction, under the important assumption that all spaces and symmetry groups involved are compact. This talk is an introduction to this principle and, if time permits, its mathematical relevance.
Krylov Subspace Methods or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love GMRes
12:10 Mon 17 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

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Many problems within applied mathematics require the solution of a linear system of equations. For instance, models of arterial umbilical blood flow are obtained through a finite element approximation, resulting in a linear, n x n system. For small systems the solution is (almost) trivial, but what happens when n is large? Say, n ~ 10^6? In this case matrix inversion is expensive (read: completely impractical) and we seek approximate solutions in a reasonable time. In this talk I will discuss the basic theory underlying Krylov subspace methods; a class of non-stationary iterative methods which are currently the methods-of-choice for large, sparse, linear systems. In particular I will focus on the method of Generalised Minimum RESiduals (GMRes), which is of the most popular for nonsymmetric systems. It is hoped that through this presentation I will convince you that a) solving linear systems is not necessarily trivial, and that b) my lack of any tangible results is not (entirely) a result of my own incompetence.
Rescaling the coalescent
12:30 Mon 8 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Adam Rohrlach :: University of Adelaide

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Recently I gave a short talk about how researchers use mathematics to estimate the time since a species' most recent common ancestor. I also pointed out why this generally doesn't work when a population hasn't had a constant population size. Then I quickly changed the subject. In this talk I aim to reintroduce the Coalescent Model, show how it works in general, and finally how researcher's deal with varying a population size.
Moduli spaces of instantons in algebraic geometry and physics
15:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ugo Bruzzo :: International School for Advanced Studies Trieste

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I will give a quick introduction to the notion of instanton, stressing its role in physics and in mathematics. I will also show how algebraic geometry provides powerful tools to study the geometry of the moduli spaces of instantons.
Mathematics in Popular Culture: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly
12:30 Mon 22 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Patrick Korbel :: University of Adelaide

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A slightly unusual (for this School at least) and hopefully entertaining look at representations of mathematics and mathematicians in popular culture. Do these representations affect people's perceptions of mathematics and its mysterious practitioners? What examples of positive and negative representations are there? Should we care and should it affect our enjoyment those texts? All these questions and many more will remain hopelessly unanswered as we try to cover examples such as Numb3rs, Mean Girls, A Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, 21, The Simpsons and Futurama. Feel free to come prepared with your own examples of egregious crimes against mathematics or refreshing beacons of hope.
Fair and Loathing in State Parliament
12:10 Mon 29 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Casey Briggs :: University of Adelaide

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The South Australian electoral system has a history of bias, malapportionment and perceived unfairness. These days, it is typical of most systems across Australia, except with one major difference - a specific legislated criterion designed to force the system to be 'fair'. In reality, fairness is a hard concept to define, and an even harder concept to enforce. In this talk I will briefly take you through the history of South Australian electoral reform, the current state of affairs and my proposed research. There will be very little in the way of rigorous mathematics. No knowledge of politics is assumed, but an understanding of the process of voting would be useful.
The Mathematics of Secrets
14:10 Mon 8 Apr, 2013 :: 210 Napier Building :: Dr Naomi Benger :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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One very important application of number theory is the implementation of public key cryptosystems that we use today. I will introduce elementary number theory, Fermat's theorem and use these to explain how ElGamal encryption and digital signatures work.
Filtering Theory in Modelling the Electricity Market
12:10 Mon 6 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ahmed Hamada :: University of Adelaide

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In mathematical finance, as in many other fields where applied mathematics is a powerful tool, we assume that a model is good enough when it captures different sources of randomness affecting the quantity of interests, which in this case is the electricity prices. The power market is very different from other markets in terms of the randomness sources that can be observed in the prices feature and evolution. We start from suggesting a new model that simulates the electricity prices, this new model is constructed by adding a periodicity term, a jumps terms and a positives mean reverting term. The later term is driven by a non-observable Markov process. So in order to prices some financial product, we have to use some of the filtering theory to deal with the non-observable process, these techniques are gaining very much of interest from practitioners and researchers in the field of financial mathematics.
Invariant Theory: The 19th Century and Beyond
15:10 Fri 21 Jun, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Jarod Alper :: Australian National University

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A central theme in 19th century mathematics was invariant theory, which was viewed as a bridge between geometry and algebra. David Hilbert revolutionized the field with two seminal papers in 1890 and 1893 with techniques such as Hilbert's basis theorem, Hilbert's Nullstellensatz and Hilbert's syzygy theorem that spawned the modern field of commutative algebra. After Hilbert's groundbreaking work, the field of invariant theory remained largely inactive until the 1960's when David Mumford revitalized the field by reinterpreting Hilbert's ideas in the context of algebraic geometry which ultimately led to the influential construction of the moduli space of smooth curves. Today invariant theory remains a vital research area with connections to various mathematical disciplines: representation theory, algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, combinatorics and nonlinear differential operators. The goal of this talk is to provide an introduction to invariant theory with an emphasis on Hilbert's and Mumford's contributions. Time permitting, I will explain recent research with Maksym Fedorchuk and David Smyth which exploits the ideas of Hilbert, Mumford as well as Kempf to answer a classical question concerning the stability of algebraic curves.
Quantization, Representations and the Orbit Philosophy
15:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

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This talk will be about the mathematics of quantization and about representation theory, where the concept of quantization seems to be especially relevant. It was discovered by Kirillov in the 1960's that the representation theory of nilpotent Lie groups (such as the group that encodes Heisenberg's commutation relations) can be beautifully and efficiently described using a vocabulary drawn from geometry and quantum mechanics. The description was soon adapted to other classes of Lie groups, and the expectation that it ought to apply almost universally has come to be called the "orbit philosophy." But despite early successes, the orbit philosophy is in a decidedly unfinished state. I'll try to explain some of the issues and some possible new directions.
An Overview of Mathematics in the Australian Curriculum
12:10 Mon 5 Aug, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Patrick Korbel :: University of Adelaide

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I will be doing an overview of mathematics in the new Australian Curriculum from Foundation (Reception) to Year 12 for those not familiar with new curriculum.
How to see in many dimensions
14:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof. Michael Murray :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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The human brain has evolved to be able to think intuitively in three dimensions. Unfortunately the real world is at least four and maybe 10, 11 or 26 dimensional. In this talk I will show how mathematics can be used to develop your ability to think in more than three dimensions.
How the leopard got his spots
14:10 Mon 14 Oct, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Ed Green :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Patterns are everywhere in nature, whether they be the spots and stripes on animals' coats, or the intricate arrangement of different cell types in a tissue. But how do these patterns arise? Whilst every cell contains a plan of the organism in its genes, the cells need to organise themselves so that each knows what it should do to achieve this plan. Mathematics can help biologists explore how different types of signals might be used to control the patterning process. In this talk, I will introduce two simple mathematical theories of biological pattern formation: Turing patterns where, surprisingly, the essential ingredient for producing the pattern is diffusion, which usually tends to make things more uniform; and the Keller-Segel model, which provides a simple mechanism for the formation of multicellular structures from isolated single cells. These mathematical models can be used to explain how tissues develop, and why there are many spotted animals with a stripy tail, but no stripy animals with a spotted tail.
Developing Multiscale Methodologies for Computational Fluid Mechanics
12:10 Mon 11 Nov, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Hammad Alotaibi :: University of Adelaide

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Recently the development of multiscale methods is one of the most fertile research areas in mathematics, physics, engineering and computer science. The need for multiscale modeling comes usually from the fact that the available macroscale models are not accurate enough, and the microscale models are not efficient enough. By combining both viewpoints, one hopes to arrive at a reasonable compromise between accuracy and efficiency. In this seminar I will give an overview of the recent efforts on developing multiscale methods such as patch dynamics scheme which is used to address an important class of time dependent multiscale problems.
The limits of proof
14:10 Wed 2 Apr, 2014 :: Hughes Lecture Room 322 :: Assoc. Prof. Finnur Larusson :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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The job of the mathematician is to discover new truths about mathematical objects and their relationships. Such truths are established by proving them. This raises a fundamental question. Can every mathematical truth be proved (by a sufficiently clever being) or are there truths that will forever lie beyond the reach of proof? Mathematics can be turned on itself to investigate this question. In this talk, we will see that under certain assumptions about proofs, there are truths that cannot be proved. You must decide for yourself whether you think these assumptions are valid!
The Mandelbrot Set
12:10 Mon 5 May, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Bowman :: University of Adelaide

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The Mandelbrot set is an icon of modern mathematics, an image which fires the popular imagination when accompanied by the words 'chaos' and 'fractal'. However, few could give even a vague definition of this mysterious set and fewer still know the mathematical meaning behind it. In this talk we will be looking at the role that the Mandelbrot set plays in complex dynamics, the study of iterated complex valued functions. We shall discuss attracting and repelling cycles and how they are related to the different components of the Mandelbrot set.
Computing with groups
15:10 Fri 30 May, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Heiko Dietrich :: Monash University

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Groups are algebraic structures which show up in many branches of mathematics and other areas of science; Computational Group Theory is on the cutting edge of pure research in group theory and its interplay with computational methods. In this talk, we consider a practical aspect of Computational Group Theory: how to represent a group in a computer, and how to work with such a description efficiently. We will first recall some well-established methods for permutation group; we will then discuss some recent progress for matrix groups.
Not nots, knots.
12:10 Mon 16 Jun, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Luke Keating-Hughes :: University of Adelaide

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Although knot theory does not ordinarily arise in classical mathematics, the study of knots themselves proves to be very intricate and is certainly an area with promise for new developments. Ultimately, the study of knots boils down to problems of classification and when two knots are seen to be 'equivalent'. In this seminar we will first talk about some basic definitions and properties of knots, then move on to calculating the knot polynomial - a powerful invariant on knots.
All's Fair in Love and Statistics
12:35 Mon 28 Jul, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Annie Conway :: University of Adelaide

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Earlier this year Wired.com published an article about a "math genius" who found true love after scraping and analysing data from a dating site. In this talk I will be investigating the actual mathematics that he used, in particular methods for clustering categorical data, and whether or not the approach was successful.
Fast computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions on bounded plane domains
15:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

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I will describe a new method for numerically computing eigenfunctions and eigenvalues on certain plane domains, derived from the so-called "scaling method" of Vergini and Saraceno. It is based on properties of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map on the domain, which relates a function f on the boundary of the domain to the normal derivative (at the boundary) of the eigenfunction with boundary data f. This is a topic of independent interest in pure mathematics. In my talk I will try to emphasize the inteplay between theory and applications, which is very rich in this situation. This is joint work with numerical analyst Alex Barnett (Dartmouth).
Mathematics: a castle in the sky?
14:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr. David Roberts :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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At university you are exposed to more rigorous mathematics than at school, exemplified by definitions such as those of real numbers individually or as a whole. However, what does mathematics ultimately rest on? Definitions depend on things defined earlier, and this process must stop at some point. Mathematicians expended a lot of energy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries trying to pin down the absolutely fundamental ideas of mathematics, with unexpected results. The results of these efforts are called foundations and are still an area of active research today. This talk will explain what foundations are, some of the historical setting in which they arose, and several of the various systems on which mathematics can be built -- and why most of the mathematics you will do only uses a tiny portion of it!
The Mathematics behind Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping
12:10 Mon 13 Oct, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Skene :: University of Adelaide

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Simultaneous localisation and mapping (or SLAM) is a process where individual images of an environment are taken and compared against one another. This comparison allows a map of the environment and changes in the location the images were taken to be determined. This presentation discusses the relevance of SLAM in making a motorised platform autonomous, the process of a SLAM algorithm, and the all important mathematics that makes a SLAM algorithm work. The resulting algorithm is then tested against using a real world motorised platform.
What happens when you eat pizza?: the science and mathematics behind digestion
14:10 Mon 27 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr. Sarthok Sircar :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Our stomach is an inferno with acidic juices that are strong enough to bore a hole through our hands. Ever wondered why the stomach does not digest itself ? The answer lies in an interesting defence mechanism along the stomach lining which also aids in digestion of food. In this talk I will present this mechanism and briefly present the physics, chemistry, biology and (off course !) the mathematics to describe this system. The talk may also answer your queries regarding heart-burn especially when you eat a lot of free-food !!
The Mathematics behind the Ingkarni Wardli Quincunx
12:10 Mon 23 Mar, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Andrew Pfeiffer :: University of Adelaide

The quincunx is a fun machine on the ground floor of Ingkarni Wardli. Hopefully you've had a chance to play with it at some point. Perhaps you were waiting for your coffee, or just procrastinating. However, you may have no idea what I'm talking about. If so, read on. To operate the quincunx, you turn a handle and push balls into a sea of needles. The needles then pseudo-randomly direct each ball into one of eight bins. On the quincunx, there is a page of instructions that makes some mathematical claims. For example, it claims that the balls should look roughly like a normal distribution. In this talk, I will discuss some of the mathematics behind the quincunx. I will also seek to make the claims of the quincunx more precise.
IGA Workshop on Symmetries and Spinors: Interactions Between Geometry and Physics
09:30 Mon 13 Apr, 2015 :: Conference Room 7.15 on Level 7 of the Ingkarni Wardli building :: J. Figueroa-O'Farrill (University of Edinburgh), M. Zabzine (Uppsala University), et al

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The interplay between physics and geometry has lead to stunning advances and enriched the internal structure of each field. This is vividly exemplified in the theory of supergravity, which is a supersymmetric extension of Einstein's relativity theory to the small scales governed by the laws of quantum physics. Sophisticated mathematics is being employed for finding solutions to the generalised Einstein equations and in return, they provide a rich source for new exotic geometries. This workshop brings together world-leading scientists from both, geometry and mathematical physics, as well as young researchers and students, to meet and learn about each others work.
Did the Legend of Zelda unfold in our Solar System?
12:10 Mon 27 Apr, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Adam Rohrlach :: University of Adelaide

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Well, obviously not. We can see the other planets, and they're not terribly conducive to Elven based life. Still, I aim to exhaustively explore the topic, all the while avoiding conventional logic and reasoning. Clearly, one could roll out any number of 'telescope' based proofs, and 'video game characters aren't really real, even after a million wishes' arguments, but I want to tackle this hotly debated issue using physics (the ugly cousin of actual mathematics). Armed with a remedial understanding of year 12 physics, from the acclaimed 2000 South Australian syllabus, I can think of no one better qualified, or possibly willing, to give this talk.
An Engineer-Mathematician Duality Approach to Finite Element Methods
12:10 Mon 18 May, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Jordan Belperio :: University of Adelaide

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The finite element method has been a prominently used numerical technique for engineers solving solid mechanics, electro-magnetic and heat transfer problems for over 30 years. More recently the finite element method has been used to solve fluid mechanics problems, a field where finite difference methods are more commonly used. In this talk, I will introduce the basic mathematics behind the finite element method, the similarity between the finite element method and finite difference method and comparing how engineers and mathematicians use finite element methods. I will then demonstrate two solutions to the wave equation using the finite element method.
Can mathematics help save energy in computing?
15:10 Fri 22 May, 2015 :: Engineering North N132 :: Prof Markus Hegland :: ANU

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Recent development of computational hardware is characterised by two trends: 1. High levels of duplication of computational capabilities in multicore, parallel and GPU processing, and, 2. Substantially faster development of the speed of computational technology compared to communication technology

A consequence of these two trends is that energy costs of modern computing devices from mobile phones to supercomputers are increasingly dominated by communication costs. In order to save energy one would thus need to reduce the amount of data movement within the computer. This can be achieved by recomputing results instead of communicating them. The resulting increase in computational redundancy may also be used to make the computations more robust against hardware faults. Paradoxically, by doing more (computations) we do use less (energy).

This talk will first discuss for a simple example how a mathematical understanding can be applied to improve computational results using extrapolation. Then the problem of energy consumption in computational hardware will be considered. Finally some recent work will be discussed which shows how redundant computing is used to mitigate computational faults and thus to save energy.

Big things are weird
12:10 Mon 25 May, 2015 :: Napier LG29 :: Luke Keating-Hughes :: University of Adelaide

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The pyramids of Giza, the depths of the Mariana trench, the massive Einstein Cross Quasar; all of these things are big and weird. Big weird things aren't just apparent in the physical world though, they appear in mathematics too! In this talk I will try to motivate a mathematical big thing and then show that it is weird. In particular, we will introduce the necessary topology and homotopy theory in order to show that although all finite dimensional spheres are (almost canonically) non-contractible spaces - an infinite dimensional sphere IS contractible! This result's significance will then be explained in the context of Kuiper's Theorem if time permits.
Science in sport: Mathematics, player tracking and machine learning
12:10 Mon 3 Aug, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Lachlan Bubb :: University of Adelaide

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Are elite athletes really getting that much bigger and faster? Probably not. So how are we getting better at sport? Probably smart people. How? Show up and you'll probably find out.
Modelling terrorism risk - can we predict future trends?
12:10 Mon 10 Aug, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Stephen Crotty :: University of Adelaide

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As we are all aware, the incidence of terrorism is increasing in the world today. This is confirmed when viewing terrorism events since 1970 as a time series. Can we model this increasing trend and use it to predict terrorism events in the future? Probably not, but we'll give it a go anyway.
Seeing the Unseeable
13:10 Mon 24 Aug, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Prof. Mike Eastwood :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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How do we know what's inside the earth? How do we know what's inside sick humans? We are all familiar with sophisticated scanning devices: this talk will explain roughly how they work and something of the mathematics built into them.
Mathematics in the Moonlight
13:10 Mon 14 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr Giang Nguyen :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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While everyone remembers that Neil Amstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, not many know the name of the second astronaut to do so. Possibly even smaller is the number of people who have heard of the mathematics that guided Apollo 11 to the moon and back. In this talk, we shall explore this mathematics.
Typhoons and Tigers
12:10 Fri 23 Oct, 2015 :: Hughes Lecture Room 322 :: Assoc. Prof. Andrew Metcalfe :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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The Sundarbans, situated on the north coast of India and south west Bangladesh, are one of the world's largest mangrove regions (4100 square kilometres). In India, there are over 4 million inhabitants on the deltaic islands in the region. There is a diverse flora and fauna, and it is the only remaining habitat of the Bengal tiger. The Sundarbans is an UNESCO World Heritage Site and International Biodiversity Reserve. However, the Sundarbans are prone to flooding from the cyclones that regularly develop in the Bay of Bengal. In this talk I shall describe a stochastic model for the flood risk and explain how this can be used to make decisions about flood mitigation strategies and to provide estimates of the increase in flood risk due to rising sea levels and climate change.
The Mathematics of Crime
15:10 Fri 23 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Prof Andrea Bertozzi :: UCLA

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Law enforcement agencies across the US have discovered that partnering with a team of mathematicians and social scientists from UCLA can help them determine where crime is likely to occur. Dr. Bertozzi will talk about the fascinating story behind her participation on the UCLA team that developed a “predictive policing” computer program that zeros-in on areas that have the highest probability of crime. In addition, the use of mathematics in studying gang crimes and other criminal activities will also be discussed. Commercial use of the "predictive-policing" program allows communities to put police officers in the right place at the right time, stopping crime before it happens.
Use of epidemic models in optimal decision making
15:00 Thu 19 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Tim Kinyanjui :: School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester

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Epidemic models have proved useful in a number of applications in epidemiology. In this work, I will present two areas that we have used modelling to make informed decisions. Firstly, we have used an age structured mathematical model to describe the transmission of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in a developed country setting and to explore different vaccination strategies. We found that delayed infant vaccination has significant potential in reducing the number of hospitalisations in the most vulnerable group and that most of the reduction is due to indirect protection. It also suggests that marked public health benefit could be achieved through RSV vaccine delivered to age groups not seen as most at risk of severe disease. The second application is in the optimal design of studies aimed at collection of household-stratified infection data. A design decision involves making a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used study designs are considered: cross-sectional and cohort. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information for each design. We found that for the cross-sectional designs, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity while the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing data collection studies.
A Semi-Markovian Modeling of Limit Order Markets
13:00 Fri 11 Dec, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Anatoliy Swishchuk :: University of Calgary

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R. Cont and A. de Larrard (SIAM J. Financial Mathematics, 2013) introduced a tractable stochastic model for the dynamics of a limit order book, computing various quantities of interest such as the probability of a price increase or the diffusion limit of the price process. As suggested by empirical observations, we extend their framework to 1) arbitrary distributions for book events inter-arrival times (possibly non-exponential) and 2) both the nature of a new book event and its corresponding inter-arrival time depend on the nature of the previous book event. We do so by resorting to Markov renewal processes to model the dynamics of the bid and ask queues. We keep analytical tractability via explicit expressions for the Laplace transforms of various quantities of interest. Our approach is justified and illustrated by calibrating the model to the five stocks Amazon, Apple, Google, Intel and Microsoft on June 21st 2012. As in Cont and Larrard, the bid-ask spread remains constant equal to one tick, only the bid and ask queues are modelled (they are independent from each other and get reinitialized after a price change), and all orders have the same size. (This talk is based on our joint paper with Nelson Vadori (Morgan Stanley)).
What is your favourite (4 dimensional) shape?
12:10 Mon 4 Apr, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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This is a circle, it lives in R^2: [picture of a circle]. This is a sphere, it lives in R^3: [picture of a sphere] In this talk I will (attempt to) give you a picture of what the next shape in this sequence (in R^4) looks like. I will also explain how all of this is related to a very important area of modern mathematics called topology.
Sard Theorem for the endpoint map in sub-Riemannian manifolds
12:10 Fri 29 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Alessandro Ottazzi :: University of New South Wales

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Sub-Riemannian geometries occur in several areas of pure and applied mathematics, including harmonic analysis, PDEs, control theory, metric geometry, geometric group theory, and neurobiology. We introduce sub-Riemannian manifolds and give some examples. Therefore we discuss some of the open problems, and in particular we focus on the Sard Theorem for the endpoint map, which is related to the study of length minimizers. Finally, we consider some recent results obtained in collaboration with E. Le Donne, R. Montgomery, P. Pansu and D. Vittone.
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
Student Performance Issues in First Year University Calculus
15:10 Fri 10 Jun, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Christine Mangelsdorf :: University of Melbourne

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MAST10006 Calculus 2 is the largest subject in the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Melbourne, accounting for about 2200 out of 7400 first year enrolments. Despite excellent and consistent feedback from students on lectures, tutorials and teaching materials, scaled failure rates in Calculus 2 averaged an unacceptably high 29.4% (with raw failure rates reaching 40%) by the end of 2014. To understand the issues behind the poor student performance, we studied the exam papers of students with grades of 40-49% over a three-year period. In this presentation, I will present data on areas of poor performance in the final exam, show samples of student work, and identify possible causes for their errors. Many of the performance issues are found to relate to basic weaknesses in the students’ secondary school mathematical skills that inhibit their ability to successfully complete Calculus 2. Since 2015, we have employed a number of approaches to support students’ learning that significantly improved student performance in assessment. I will discuss the changes made to assessment practices and extra support materials provided online and in person, that are driving the improvement.
The mystery of colony collapse: Mathematics and honey bee loss
15:10 Fri 16 Sep, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Mary Myerscough :: University of Sydney

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Honey bees are vital to the production of many foods which need to be pollinated by insects. Yet in many parts of the world honey bee colonies are in decline. A crucial contributor to hive well-being is the health, productivity and longevity of its foragers. When forager numbers are depleted due to stressors in the colony (such as disease or malnutrition) or in the environment (such as pesticides) there is a significant effect, not only on the amount of food (nectar and pollen) that can be collected but also on the colony's capacity to raise brood (eggs, larvae and pupae) to produce new adult bees to replace lost or aged bees. We use a set of differential equation models to explore the effect on the hive of high forager death rates. In particular we examine what happens when bees become foragers at a comparatively young age and how this can lead to a sudden rapid decline of adult bees and the death of the colony.
Minimal surfaces and complex analysis
12:10 Fri 24 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Antonio Alarcon :: University of Granada

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A surface in the Euclidean space R^3 is said to be minimal if it is locally area-minimizing, meaning that every point in the surface admits a compact neighborhood with the least area among all the surfaces with the same boundary. Although the origin of minimal surfaces is in physics, since they can be realized locally as soap films, this family of surfaces lies in the intersection of many fields of mathematics. In particular, complex analysis in one and several variables plays a fundamental role in the theory. In this lecture we will discuss the influence of complex analysis in the study of minimal surfaces.
Algae meet the mathematics of multiplicative multifractals
12:10 Tue 2 May, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Professor Tony Roberts :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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There is much that is fragmented and rough in the world around us: clouds and landscapes are examples, as is algae. We need fractal geometry to encompass these. In practice we need multifractals: a composite of interwoven sets, each with their own fractal structure. Multiplicative multifractals have known properties. Optimising a fit between them and the data then empowers us to quantify subtle details of fractal geometry in applications, such as in algae distribution.
What are operator algebras and what are they good for?
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Prof Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

Back in the early 1900s when people were first grappling with the new ideas of quantum mechanics and looking for mathematical techniques to study them, they found themselves, unavoidably, dealing with what have now become known as operator algebras. As a research area, operator algebras has come a very long way since then, and has spread out to touch on many other areas of mathematics, as well as maintaining its links with mathematical physics. I'll try to convey roughly what operator algebras are, and describe some of the highlights of their career thus far, particularly the more recent ones.
Plumbing regular closed polygonal curves
12:10 Mon 22 May, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Dr Barry Cox :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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In 1980 the following puzzle appeared in Mathematics Magazine: A certain mathematician, in order to make ends meet, moonlights as an apprentice plumber. One night, as the mathematician contemplated a pile of straight pipes of equal lengths and right-angled elbows, the following question occurred to this mathematician: ``For which positive integers n could I form a closed polygonal curve using n such straight pipes and n elbows?'' It turns out that it is possible for any even number n greater than or equal to 4 and any odd number n greater than or equal to 7. However the case n=7 is particularly interesting because it can be done one of two ways and the problem is related to that of determining all the possible conformations of the molecule cyclo-heptane, although the angles in cyclo-heptane are not right angles. This raises the questions: ``Do the two solutions to the maths puzzle with right-angles correspond to the two principal conformations of cyclo-heptane?'', and ``How many solutions/conformations exist for other elbow angles?'' These and other issues will be discussed.
Mathematics is Biology's Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered "an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or "motifs"), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Mathematics is Biology'€™s Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered “an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or “motifs”), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Conway's Rational Tangle
12:10 Tue 15 Aug, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Hang Wang :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Many researches in mathematics essentially feature some classification problems. In this context, invariants are created in order to associate algebraic quantities, such as numbers and groups, to elements of interested classes of geometric objects, such as surfaces. A key property of an invariant is that it does not change under ``allowable moves'' which can be specified in various geometric contexts. We demonstrate these lines of ideas by rational tangles, a notion in knot theory. A tangle is analogous to a link except that it has free ends. Conway's rational tangles are the simplest tangles that can be ``unwound'' under a finite sequence of two simple moves, and they arise as building blocks for knots. A numerical invariant will be introduced for Conway's rational tangles and it provides the only known example of a complete invariant in knot theory.
Braid groups and higher representation theory
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Tony Licata :: Australian National University

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The Artin braid group arise in a number of different parts of mathematics. The goal of this talk will be to explain how basic group-theoretic questions about the Artin braid group can be answered using some modern tools of linear and homological algebra, with an eye toward proving some open conjectures about other groups.
Interactive theorem proving for mathematicians
15:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

Mathematicians use computers to write their proofs (LaTeX), and to do their calculations (Sage, Mathematica, Maple, Matlab, etc, as well as custom code for simulations or searches). However today we rarely use computers to help us to construct and understand proofs. There is a long tradition in computer science of interactive and automatic theorem proving; particularly today these are important tools in engineering correct software, as well as in optimisation and compilation. There have been some notable examples of formalisation of modern mathematics (e.g. the odd order theorem, the Kepler conjecture, and the four-colour theorem). Even in these cases, huge engineering efforts were required to translate the mathematics to a form a computer could understand. Moreover, in most areas of research there is a huge gap between the interests of human mathematicians and the abilities of computer provers. Nevertheless, I think it's time for mathematicians to start getting interested in interactive theorem provers! It's now possible to write proofs, and write tools that help write proofs, in languages which are expressive enough to encompass most of modern mathematics, and ergonomic enough to use for general purpose programming. I'll give an informal introduction to dependent type theory (the logical foundation of many modern theorem provers), some examples of doing mathematics in such a system, and my experiences working with mathematics students in these systems.

News matching "Mathematics of Risk"

Usenet Conference
Associate Professor Matt Roughan (Applied Mathematics) has been invited to Co-Chair the Association for Computing Machinery Usenet Internet Measurement Conference. Posted Mon 15 Jan 07.
Dr Yvonne Stokes wins Michell Medal
Dr Yvonne Stokes (Applied Mathematics) was awarded the 2007 J.H. Michell Medal of ANZIAM. The award is made annually to an outstanding new researcher, one who is in the first ten years of their research career. Read Yvonne's citation here. Posted Mon 5 Mar 07.
ARC success
The School of Mathematical Sciences was again very successful in attracting Australian Research Council funding for 2008. Recipients of ARC Discovery Projects are (with staff from the School highlighted):

Prof NG Bean; Prof PG Howlett; Prof CE Pearce; Prof SC Beecham; Dr AV Metcalfe; Dr JW Boland: WaterLog - A mathematical model to implement recommendations of The Wentworth Group.

2008-2010: $645,000

Prof RJ Elliott: Dynamic risk measures. (Australian Professorial Fellowship)

2008-2012: $897,000

Dr MD Finn: Topological Optimisation of Fluid Mixing.

2008-2010: $249,000

Prof PG Bouwknegt; Prof M Varghese; A/Prof S Wu: Dualities in String Theory and Conformal Field Theory in the context of the Geometric Langlands Program.

2008-2010: $240,000

The latter grant is held through the ANU Posted Wed 26 Sep 07.

Mathematics Building to be demolished
The existing mathematics building will be demolished to make way for a new 8-storey, 6-star building. The new building, which is expected to be completed for the start of semester 1, 2010, will house the Schools of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences. The demolition will begin on 10th December 2007. See the Building Life Impact web-site for more details. Posted Mon 12 Nov 07.
School to move to new accommodation
In anticipation of the demolition of the existing Mathematics building, the School of Mathematical Sciences will be moving to new temporary accommodation. As from 10th December 2007 we can be found on level 3 (School Office) and 4 of 10 Pulteney Street. Posted Mon 10 Dec 07.
Potts Medal Winner
Professor Charles Pearce, the Elder Profesor of Mathematics, was awarded the Ren Potts Medal by the Australian Society for Operations Research at its annual meeting in December. This is a national award for outstanding contributions to Operations Research in Australia. Posted Tue 22 Jan 08.
University Implementation Grant for Learning and Teaching Enhancements
Congratulations to Dr Adrian Koerber and Dr Paul McCann who have been successful in securing $40,000 funding from the University Implementation Grant for Learning and Teaching Enhancements. Their proposal "An enhanced implementation of Maple T.A. in mathematics service courses" will expand the use of Maple TA, and online assessment, further into the School large second year service courses. Posted Fri 18 Apr 08.
Open Day Innovation Fund Success
Congratulations to Associate Professor Matt Roughan, Mr David Butler and Mr Jono Tuke who have been awarded $2000 from the Open Day Innovation Fund for their project "Tactile Mathematics". Posted Fri 18 Apr 08.
Positions available in the School (5)
The School is currently seeking a Professor of Statistics, an Associate Professor of Statistics, a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics, a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and a Lecturer in Pure Mathematics. See the University's jobs website for full details, including the selection criteria. Posted Fri 23 May 08.
Teaching Fellow Position

Visiting Teaching Fellow School of Mathematical Sciences (Ref: 3808)

We are seeking a Visiting Teaching Fellow (Associate Lecturer) who will be responsible for developing better links between the University of Adelaide and secondary schools and developing new approaches for first-year undergraduate teaching. You will be required to conduct tutorials in first year mathematics and statistics subjects for up to 16 hours per week, and assist in subject assessment and curriculum development.

This position would suit an experienced mathematics teacher with strong mathematical training and an interest and recent involvement in teaching advanced mathematics units in years 11 and 12. Fixed-term position available from 19 January 2009 to 31 December 2009. Salary: (Level A) $49,053 - $66,567 per annum.Plus an employer superannuation contribution of 17% applies. (Closing date 14/11/08.)

Please see the University web site for further details.

Posted Wed 17 Sep 08.
Positions available in the School (2)
The School expects to advertise two tenurable ("tenure track") positions, one in Pure Mathematics and one in Applied Mathematics, in the coming month. Please check back regularly for further details. Posted Fri 6 Mar 09.
Mini Winter School on Geometry and Physics
The Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a Winter School on Geometry and Physics on 20-22 July 2009. There will be three days of expository lectures aimed at 3rd year and honours students interested in postgraduate studies in pure mathematics or mathematical physics. Posted Wed 24 Jun 09.

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Position available: Lecturer in Applied Mathematics
The School is currently seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics in the area of optimisation. See the University's jobs website for full details, including the selection criteria. Posted Wed 26 Aug 09.
Position available: Professor of Pure Mathematics
The School is currently seeking to appoint a Professor of Pure Mathematics. See the University's jobs website for full details, including the selection criteria. Posted Fri 18 Sep 09.

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Sam Cohen wins prize for best student talk at Aust MS 2009
Congratulations to Mr Sam Cohen, a PhD student within the School, who was awarded the B. H. Neumann Prize for the best student paper at the 2009 meeting of the Australian Mathematical Society for his talk on Dynamic Risk Measures and Nonlinear Expectations with Markov Chain noise. Posted Tue 6 Oct 09.
ARC Grant successes
Congratulations to Tony Roberts, Charles Pearce, Robert Elliot, Andrew Metcalfe and all their collaborators on their success in the current round of ARC grants. The projects are "Development of innovative technologies for oil production based on the advanced theory of suspension flows in porous media" (Tony Roberts et al.), "Perturbation and approximation methods for linear operators with applications to train control, water resource management and evolution of physical systems" (Charles Pearce et al.), "Risk Measures and Management in Finance and Actuarial Science Under Regime-Switching Models" (Robert Elliott et al.) and "A new flood design methodology for a variable and changing climate" (Andrew Metcalfe et al.) Posted Mon 26 Oct 09.
Group of Eight review
The Go8 Review of Mathematics and Quantitative Disciplines has been released and is now available on the Go8 website. Posted Sat 20 Mar 10.

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New Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science
Professor Mathai Varghese, Professor of Pure Mathematics and ARC Professorial Fellow within the School of Mathematical Sciences, was elected to the Australian Academy of Science. Professor Varghese's citation read "for his distinguished for his work in geometric analysis involving the topology of manifolds, including the Mathai-Quillen formalism in topological field theory.". Posted Tue 30 Nov 10.
Lectureships in Pure and Applied Mathematics
Two lecturer positions are now available, one in Pure Mathematics and one in Applied Mathematics. The closing date is 17th December 2010. Further details of these two positions, and how to apply, can be found here: Lecturer in Pure Mathematics and the Lecturer in Applied Mathematics Posted Tue 30 Nov 10.
Post-doctoral positions available in Applied Mathematics
Four post-doctoral positions are now available in Applied Mathematics. Further details of these positions including the application procedure and closing dates can be found here and here. Posted Wed 22 Dec 10.
Professor of Pure Mathematics
We are seeking an experienced researcher with an international reputation in an area of Pure Mathematics to join the School as a Full Professor in Pure Mathematics. You will also be an enthusiastic contributor to our teaching programs at undergraduate and postgraduate levels and be willing to take a leading role in the continued development and expansion of the School. Full details on how to apply, including the selection criteria are available on the University's jobs website. Posted Fri 3 Jun 11.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
(5–9 September 2011) Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage Posted Wed 27 Jul 11.

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Two contract positions are available
As a result of the School's success in securing two prestigious Australian Research Council Future Fellowships, we now have two limited term positions available, one in Pure Mathematics and one in Statistics. Posted Wed 14 Dec 11.
Hayden Tronnolone receives A. F. Pillow Scholarship
Please join me in congratulating Mr Hayden Tronnolone who was awarded the A. F. Pillow Applied Mathematics Top-up Scholarship at the 2012 ANZIAM conference in Warrnambool. Posted Thu 16 Feb 12.
2013 AMSI-Mahler Lecture Tour - Public Lecture

How to stack oranges in three dimensions, 24 dimensions, and beyond.

September 26, 6:00pm Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre

Professor Akshay Venkatesh, Professor of Mathematics, Stanford University

Further details here

Posted Thu 26 Sep 13.
Outstanding results in the COMAP Mathematical Contest in Modeling
Congratulations to Parsa Kavkani, Alex Tam, Leon Chea, Helen Geng and Susan Pang, who participated in this year's Mathematical Contest in Modeling, run by the Consortium for Mathematics and Its Applications (COMAP). The team with Parsa Kavkani and Alex Tam was designated an "Outstanding Winner" for Problem A (on the spreading of Ebola) and was awarded an INFORMS award for their work. Only 5 outstanding winners were selected from over 5000 entries for this problem, which is an amazing achievement. The team with Leon Chea, Helen Geng and Susan Pang was designated a "Meritorious Winner" for Problem A. There were about 640 meritorious winners out of the 5000, which is also an excellent achievement. Posted Tue 28 Apr 15.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project is expected to enhance Australia’s position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project will enhance Australia's position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Publications matching "Mathematics of Risk"

Publications
On risk minimizing portfolios under a Markovian regime-switching Black-Scholes economy
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, Annals of Operations Research 1 (1–21) 2009
Portfolio risk minimization and differential games
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications In Press (–) 2009
Risk-hedging in real estate markets
Cadenillas, A; Elliott, Robert; Miao, H; Wu, Z, Asia-Pacific Financial Markets In Press (1–21) 2009
The decay of suddenly blocked flow in a curved pipe
Clarke, Robert; Denier, James, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 63 (241–257) 2009
Unsteady response of non-Newtonian blood flow through a stenosed artery in magnetic field
Ikbal, M; Chakravarty, S; Wong, Kelvin; Mazumdar, Jagan; Mandal, P, Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 230 (243–259) 2009
Elementary Calculus of Financial Mathematics
Roberts, Anthony John, (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) 2009
A markovian regime-switching stochastic differential game for portfolio risk minimization
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, 2008 American Control Conference, Washington 11/06/08
A PDE approach for risk measures for derivatives with regime switching
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T; Chan, L, Annals of Finance 4 (55–74) 2008
A self tuning model for risk estimation
Elliott, Robert; Filinkov, Alexei, Expert Systems with Applications 34 (1692–1697) 2008
Assessing the potential usefulness of IGF-related peptides and adiponectin for predicting disease risk
Belobrajdic, Damien; Priebe, I; Forbes, Briony; Flyvbjerg, A; Chen, J; Cosgrove, L; Frystyk, J; Saunders, Ian, Growth Hormone & IGF Research 18 (198–204) 2008
Holomorphic classification of four-dimensional surfaces in C3
Beloshapka, V; Ezhov, Vladimir; Schmalz, G, Izvestiya Mathematics 72 (413–427) 2008
Influence of rapid changes in a channel bottom on free-surface flows
Binder, Benjamin; Dias, F; Vanden-Broeck, J, IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 73 (254–273) 2008
Some U-Statistics in goodness-of-fit tests derived from characterizations via record values
Morris, Kerwin; Szynal, D, International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics 46 (507–582) 2008
Stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) with a conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) criterion for management of storm-water
Piantadosi, J; Metcalfe, Andrew; Howlett, P, Journal of Hydrology 348 (320–329) 2008
Stochastic linear programming and conditional value-at-risk for water resources management
Webby, Roger; Boland, J; Howlett, P; Metcalfe, Andrew, The ANZIAM Journal - On-line full-text 48 (885–898) 2008
Synchronization of neural networks based on parameter identification and via output or state coupling
Lou, X; Cui, B, Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 222 (440–457) 2008
The importance of calculating absolute rather than relative fracture risk (vol 41, pg 937, 2007)
Tucker, G; Metcalfe, Andrew; Pearce, Charles; Need, Allan; Dick, I; Prince, R; Nordin, Borje, Bone 42 (1241–1241) 2008
The mathematical modelling of rotating capillary tubes for holey-fibre manufacture
Voyce, Christopher; Fitt, A; Monro, Tanya, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 60 (69–87) 2008
Using distortions of copulas to price synthetic CDOs
Crane, Glenis Jayne; Van Der Hoek, John, Insurance Mathematics & Economics 42 (903–908) 2008
Thomas P. Branson (1953?2006) - Professor of Mathematics, University of Iowa
Chang, A; Eastwood, Michael; Gover, R; Jorgensen, P; Olafsson, G; Oersted, B; Yang, P; Peterson, L; Svidersky, O; Ugalde, W; Hong, P, Acta Applicandae Mathematicae 102 (127–129) 2008
Aspects of Dirac operators in analysis
Eastwood, Michael; Ryan, J, Milan Journal of Mathematics 75 (91–116) 2007
Computation of extensional fall of slender viscous drops by a one-dimensional eulerian method
Hajek, Bronwyn; Stokes, Yvonne; Tuck, Ernest, Siam Journal on Applied Mathematics 67 (1166–1182) 2007
Goodness-of-fit tests based on characterizations involving moments of order statistics
Morris, Kerwin; Szynal, D, International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics 38 (83–121) 2007
The Mekong-applications of value at risk (VAR) and conditional value at risk (CVAR) simulation to the benefits, costs and consequences of water resources development in a large river basin
Webby, Roger; Adamson, Peter; Boland, J; Howlett, P; Metcalfe, Andrew; Piantadosi, J, Ecological Modelling 201 (89–96) 2007
The difference between hazard and risk in the relation between bone density and fracture
Nordin, Borje; Baghurst, Peter; Metcalfe, Andrew, Calcified Tissue International 80 (349–352) 2007
The importance of calculating absolute rather than relative fracture risk
Tucker, Graeme; Metcalfe, Andrew; Pearce, Charles; Need, Allan; Dick, I; Prince, R; Nordin, Borje, Bone 41 (937–941) 2007
The twistor construction and Penrose transform in split signature
Eastwood, Michael, The Asian Journal of Mathematics 11 (103–111) 2007
A biography of J. N. Newman
Tuck, Ernest, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 58 (1–5) 2007
Cayley hypersurfaces
Eastwood, Michael; Ezhov, Vladimir, Steklov Institute of Mathematics. Proceedings 253 (221–224) 2006
Conditional value-at-risk for water management in Lake Burley Griffin
Webby, Roger; Boland, J; Howlett, P; Metcalfe, Andrew; Sritharan, T, The ANZIAM Journal 47 (C116–C136) 2006
Heat kernels and the range of the trace on completions of twisted group algebras
Varghese, Mathai, Contemporary Mathematics 398 (321–345) 2006
Kato's inequality and asymptotic spectral properties for discrete magnetic Laplacians
Dodziuk, Josef; Varghese, Mathai, Contemporary Mathematics 398 (69–82) 2006
Linear transformations on codes
Glynn, David; Gulliver, T; Gupta, M, Discrete Mathematics 306 (1871–1880) 2006
On a generalised Connes-Hochschild-Kostant-Rosenberg theorem
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Advances in Mathematics 200 (303–335) 2006
Prolongations of geometric overdetermined systems
Branson, T; Cap, A; Eastwood, Michael; Gover, A, International Journal of Mathematics 17 (641–664) 2006
Some Penrose transforms in complex differential geometry
Anco, S; Bland, J; Eastwood, Michael, Science in China Series A-Mathematics Physics Astronomy 49 (1599–1610) 2006
The instability of the flow in a suddenly blocked pipe
Jewell, Nathaniel; Denier, James, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics 59 (651–673) 2006
Resolving the multitude of microscale interactions accurately models stochastic partial differential equations
Roberts, Anthony John, London Mathematical Society. Journal of Computation and Mathematics 9 (193–221) 2006
Class-D audio amplifiers with negative feedback
Cox, Stephen; Candy, B, Siam Journal on Applied Mathematics 66 (468–488) 2005
Examples of unbounded homogeneous domains in complex space
Eastwood, Michael; Isaev, A, Science in China Series A-Mathematics Physics Astronomy 48 (248–261) 2005
Generalized quadrangles and regularity
Brown, Matthew, Discrete Mathematics 294 (25–42) 2005
Goodness-of-fit tests via characterizations
Morris, Kerwin; Szynal, D, International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics 23 (491–555) 2005
Hamiltonian dynamics and morse topology of humanoid robots
Ivancevic, V; Pearce, Charles, Global Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences (GJMMS) 1 (9–19) 2005
Higher symmetries of the Laplacian
Eastwood, Michael, Annals of Mathematics 161 (1645–1665) 2005
L2 torsion without the determinant class condition and extended L2 cohomology
Braverman, M; Carey, Alan; Farber, M; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Contemporary Mathematics 7 (421–462) 2005
On some polynomial-like inequalities of Brenner and Alzer
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics 6 (WWW 1–WWW 5) 2005
Oriented site percolation, phase transitions and probability bounds
Pearce, Charles; Fletcher, F, Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics 6 (WWW 1–WWW 15) 2005
Representations via overdetermined systems
Eastwood, Michael, Contemporary Mathematics 368 (201–210) 2005
Risk-sensitive filtering and smoothing for continuous-time Markov processes
Malcolm, William; Elliott, Robert; James, M, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 51 (1731–1738) 2005
Self-similar "stagnation point" boundary layer flows with suction or injection
King, J; Cox, Stephen, Studies in Applied Mathematics 115 (73–107) 2005
Free surface flows past surfboards and sluice gates
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J, European Journal of Applied Mathematics 16 (601–619) 2005
Preface to the Proceedings of the 7th Biennial Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference, EMAC-2005
Stacey, A; Blyth, B; Shepherd, J; Roberts, Anthony John, The ANZIAM Journal 47 (–) 2005
Some Properties of the Capacity Value Function
Chiera, Belinda; Krzesinski, A; Taylor, Peter, Siam Journal on Applied Mathematics 65 (1407–1419) 2005
A deterministic discretisation-step upper bound for state estimation via Clark transformations
Malcolm, William; Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, J.A.M.S.A. Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis 2004 (371–384) 2004
A fundamental solution for linear second-order elliptic systems with variable coefficients
Clements, David, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 49 (209–216) 2004
Kirillov theory for a class of discrete nilpotent groups
Tandra, Haryono; Moran, W, Canadian Journal of Mathematics-Journal Canadien de Mathematiques 56 (883–896) 2004
Large-Reynolds-number asymptotics of the Berman problem
Cox, Stephen; King, J, Studies in Applied Mathematics 113 (217–243) 2004
Mixing measures for a two-dimensional chaotic Stokes flow
Finn, Matthew; Cox, Stephen; Byrne, H, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 48 (129–155) 2004
Moduli of isolated hypersurface singularities
Eastwood, Michael, The Asian Journal of Mathematics 8 (305–314) 2004
Monads and bundles on rational surfaces
Buchdahl, Nicholas, Rocky Mountain Journal of Mathematics 34 (513–540) 2004
Pricing claims on non tradable assets
Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, Contemporary Mathematics 351 (103–114) 2004
Reactions to genetically modified food crops and how perception of risks and benefits influences consumers' information gathering
Wilson, Carlene; Evans, G; Leppard, Phillip; Syrette, J, Risk Analysis 24 (1311–1321) 2004
Mathematics of Financial Markets
Elliott, Robert; Kopp, P, (Springer) 2004
Arbitrage in a Discrete Version of the Wick-Fractional Black Scholes Model
Bender, C; Elliott, Robert, Mathematics of Operations Research 29 (935–945) 2004
Euler and his contribution to number theory
Glen, Amy; Scott, Paul, Australian Mathematics Teacher 1 (2–5) 2004
Two-zone model of shear dispersion in a channel using centre manifolds
Roberts, Anthony John; Strunin, D, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics 57 (363–378) 2004
Stochastic modelling of tidal anomaly for estimation of flood risk in coastal areas
Ahmer, Ingrid; Lambert, Martin; Leonard, Michael; Metcalfe, Andrew, 28th International Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium, Wollongong, NSW, Australia 10/11/03
Approximating L2 invariants and the Atiyah conjecture
Dodziuk, Josef; Linnell, P; Varghese, Mathai; Schick, T; Yates, Stuart, Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics 56 (839–873) 2003
Interpolations of Jensen's inequality
Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Tamkang Journal of Mathematics 34 (175–187) 2003
On some spectral results relating to the relative values of means
Pearce, Charles, Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics 4 (1–7) 2003
Radon and Fourier transforms for D-modules
D'Agnolo, A; Eastwood, Michael, Advances in Mathematics 180 (452–485) 2003
The geometric triangle for 3-dimensional Seiberg-Witten monopoles
Carey, Alan; Marcolli, M; Wang, Bai-Ling, Communications in Contemporary Mathematics 5 (197–250) 2003
The nonparallel evolution of nonlinear short waves in buoyant boundary layers
Denier, James; Bassom, A, Studies in Applied Mathematics 110 (139–156) 2003
A holistic finite difference approach models linear dynamics consistently
Roberts, Anthony John, Mathematics of Computation 72 (247–262) 2003
Modelling the dynamics of turbulent floods
Mei, Z; Roberts, Anthony John; Li, Z, Siam Journal on Applied Mathematics 63 (423–458) 2003
On a generalized form of risk measure
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T; Yang, H, Actuaries Australia 9 (587–623) 2003
Using the Hull and White two factor model in bank treasury risk management
Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, chapter in Mathematical finance - Bachelier Congress 2000. Selected papers from the First World Congress of the Bachelier Finance Society, Paris, June 29-July 1, 2000 (Springer-Verlag) 269–280, 2002
A comparison of linear and nonlinear computations of waves made by slender submerged bodies
Tuck, Ernest; Scullen, David, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 42 (255–264) 2002
Inequalities for lattice constrained planar convex sets
Hillock, P; Scott, Paul, Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics 3 (www 23:1–www 23:10) 2002
Ruled cubic surfaces in PG(4, q), Baer subplanes of PG(2, q2) and Hermitian curves
Casse, Rey; Quinn, Catherine, Discrete Mathematics 248 (17–25) 2002
Supporting maintenance strategies using Markov models
Al-Hassan, K; Swailes, D; Chan, J; Metcalfe, Andrew, IMA Journal of Management Mathematics 13 (17–27) 2002
Towards the inverse of a word
Clarke, Robert, Discrete Mathematics 256 (595–607) 2002
Weak UCP and perturbed monopole equations
Booss-Bavnbek, B; Marcolli, M; Wang, Bai-Ling, International Journal of Mathematics 13 (987–1008) 2002
Reanalysis of Travelling Speed and the Risk of Crash Involvement in Adelaide South Australia
Kloeden, Craig; McLean, Alexander; Glonek, Garique,
A class of non-expected utility risk measures and implications for asset allocations
Van Der Hoek, John; Sherris, M, Insurance Mathematics & Economics 28 (69–82) 2001
A classification of non-degenerate homogeneous equiaffine hypersurfaces in four complex dimensions
Eastwood, Michael; Ezhov, Vladimir, The Asian Journal of Mathematics 5 (721–740) 2001
On Boutroux's tritronque solutions of the first Painlev equation
Joshi, Nalini; Kitaev, Alexandre, Studies in Applied Mathematics 107 (253–291) 2001
On Euler trapezoid formulae
Dedic, L; Matic, M; Pecaric, Josip, Applied Mathematics and Computation 123 (37–62) 2001
Plya-type inequalities for arbitrary functions
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip; Varosanec, S, Houston Journal of Mathematics 27 (601–612) 2001
The Mx/G/1 queue with queue length dependent service times
Choi, B; Kim, Y; Shin, Y; Pearce, Charles, J.A.M.S.A. Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis 14 (399–419) 2001
Twistor results for integral transforms
Bailey, T; Eastwood, Michael, Contemporary Mathematics 278 (77–86) 2001
A generalized trapezoid inequality for functions of bounded variation
Cerone, Pietro; Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles, Turkish Journal of Mathematics 24 (147–163) 2000
Analytic continuation of vector bundles with Lp-curvature
Harris, A; Tonegawa, Y, International Journal of Mathematics 11 (29–40) 2000
Blowups and gauge fields
Buchdahl, Nicholas, Pacific Journal of Mathematics 196 (69–111) 2000
CVBEM for a class of linear crack problems
Ang, W; Clements, David; Dehghan, M, Mathematics and Mechanics of Solids 4 (369–391) 2000
Correspondences, von Neumann algebras and holomorphic L2 torsion
Carey, Alan; Farber, M; Varghese, Mathai, Canadian Journal of Mathematics-Journal Canadien de Mathematiques 52 (695–736) 2000
Deformations of carbon-fiber-reinforced yacht masts
Clements, David; Cooke, Tristrom, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 37 (11–25) 2000
Extensional fall of a very viscous fluid drop
Stokes, Yvonne; Tuck, Ernest; Schwartz, L, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics 53 (565–582) 2000
Inequalities for convex sets
Scott, Paul; Awyong, P-W, Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics 1 (1–6) 2000
Inequalities for differentiable mappings with application to special means and quadrature formulae
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Applied Mathematics Letters 13 (51–55) 2000
Multivariate Hardy-type inequalities
Hanjs, Z; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Tamkang Journal of Mathematics 31 (149–158) 2000
Nonexistence results for the Korteweg-de Vries and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equations
Joshi, Nalini; Petersen, J; Schubert, Luke Mark, Studies in Applied Mathematics 105 (361–374) 2000
Notes on Seiberg-Witten-Floer theory
Carey, Alan; Wang, Bai-Ling, Contemporary Mathematics 258 (71–85) 2000
On unbounded p-summable Fredholm modules
Carey, Alan; Phillips, J; Sukochev, Fedor, Advances in Mathematics 151 (140–163) 2000
Reciprocal link for 2 + 1-dimensional extensions of shallow water equations
Hone, Andrew, Applied Mathematics Letters 13 (37–42) 2000
Refinements of Jensen's inequality
Brnetic, I; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Tamkang Journal of Mathematics 31 (63–69) 2000
Remarks on a variable-coefficient sine-gordon equation
Hone, Andrew, Applied Mathematics Letters 13 (83–84) 2000
The unified treatment of some inequalities of Ostrowski and Simpson types
Culjak, V; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Soochow Journal of Mathematics 26 (377–390) 2000
Weak and generalized solutions to abstract stochastic equations
Melnikova, I; Filinkov, Alexei, Doklady Mathematics 62 (373–377) 2000

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