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People matching "Index type invariants for twisted signature comple"

Dr Pedram Hekmati
Adjunct Senior Lecturer


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Dr Peter Hochs
Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, Marie Curie Fellowship


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Professor Mathai Varghese
Elder Professor of Mathematics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Scie


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Dr Hang Wang
ARC DECRA Fellow


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Events matching "Index type invariants for twisted signature comple"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
Maths and Movie Making
15:10 Fri 13 Oct, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Michael Anderson

Mathematics underlies many of the techniques used in modern movie making. This talk will sketch out the movie visual effects pipeline, discussing how mathematics is used in the various stages and detailing some of the mathematical areas that are still being actively researched.
The talk will finish with an overview of the type of work the speaker is involved in, the steps that led him there and the opportunities for mathematicians in this new and exciting area.
A Bivariate Zero-inflated Poisson Regression Model and application to some Dental Epidemiological data
14:10 Fri 27 Oct, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: University Prof Sudhir Paul

Data in the form of paired (pre-treatment, post-treatment) counts arise in the study of the effects of several treatments after accounting for possible covariate effects. An example of such a data set comes from a dental epidemiological study in Belo Horizonte (the Belo Horizonte caries prevention study) which evaluated various programmes for reducing caries. Also, these data may show extra pairs of zeros than can be accounted for by a simpler model, such as, a bivariate Poisson regression model. In such situations we propose to use a zero-inflated bivariate Poisson regression (ZIBPR) model for the paired (pre-treatment, posttreatment) count data. We develop EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the ZIBPR model. Further, we obtain exact Fisher information matrix of the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the ZIBPR model and develop a procedure for testing treatment effects. The procedure to detect treatment effects based on the ZIBPR model is compared, in terms of size, by simulations, with an earlier procedure using a zero-inflated Poisson regression (ZIPR) model of the post-treatment count with the pre-treatment count treated as a covariate. The procedure based on the ZIBPR model holds level most effectively. A further simulation study indicates good power property of the procedure based on the ZIBPR model. We then compare our analysis, of the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index data from the caries prevention study, based on the ZIBPR model with the analysis using a zero-inflated Poisson regression model in which the pre-treatment DMFT index is taken to be a covariate
Insights into the development of the enteric nervous system and Hirschsprung's disease
15:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics building University of Adelaide :: Assoc. Prof. Kerry Landman :: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

During the development of the enteric nervous system, neural crest (NC) cells must first migrate into and colonise the entire gut from stomach to anal end. The migratory precursor NC cells change type and differentiate into neurons and glia cells. These cells form the enteric nervous system, which gives rise to normal gut function and peristaltic contraction. Failure of the NC cells to invade the whole gut results in a lack of neurons in a length of the terminal intestine. This potentially fatal condition, marked by intractable constipation, is called Hirschsprung's Disease. The interplay between cell migration, cell proliferation and embryonic gut growth are important to the success of the NC cell colonisation process. Multiscale models are needed in order to model the different spatiotemporal scales of the NC invasion. For example, the NC invasion wave moves into unoccupied regions of the gut with a wave speed of around 40 microns per hour. New time-lapse techniques have shown that there is a web-like network structure within the invasion wave. Furthermore, within this network, individual cell trajectories vary considerably. We have developed a population-scale model for basic rules governing NC cell invasive behaviour incorporating the important mechanisms. The model predictions were tested experimentally. Mathematical and experimental results agreed. The results provide an understanding of why many of the genes implicated in Hirschsprung's Disease influence NC population size. Our recently developed individual cell-based model also produces an invasion wave with a well-defined wave speed; however, in addition Individual cell trajectories within the invasion wave can be extracted. Further challenges in modeling the various scales of the developmental system will be discussed.
Impulsively generated drops
15:00 Fri 27 Feb, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof William Phillips :: Swinburne University of Technology

This talk is concerned with the evolution of an unbounded inviscid fluid-fluid interface subject to an axisymmetric impulse in pressure and how inertial, interfacial and gravitational forces affect that evolution. The construct was motivated by the occurrence of lung hemorrhage resulting from ultrasonic imaging and pursues the notion that bursts of ultrasound act to expel droplets that puncture the soft air-filled sacs in the lung plural surface allowing them to fill with blood. The evolution of the free surface is described by a boundary integral formulation which is integrated forward in time numerically. As the interface evolves, it is seen, depending upon the levels of gravity and surface tension, to form either axisymmetric surface jets, waves or droplets. Moreover the droplets may be spherical, inverted tear-shaped or pancake like. Also of interest is the finite time singularity which occurs when the drop pinches off; this is seen to be of the power law type with an exponent of 2/3.
The index theorem for projective families of elliptic operators
13:10 Fri 13 Mar, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Lagrangian fibrations on holomorphic symplectic manifolds I: Holomorphic Lagrangian fibrations
13:10 Fri 5 Jun, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Justin Sawon :: Colorado State University

A compact K{\"a}hler manifold $X$ is a holomorphic symplectic manifold if it admits a non-degenerate holomorphic two-form $\sigma$. According to a theorem of Matsushita, fibrations on $X$ must be of a very restricted type: the fibres must be Lagrangian with respect to $\sigma$ and the generic fibre must be a complex torus. Moreover, it is expected that the base of the fibration must be complex projective space, and this has been proved by Hwang when $X$ is projective. The simplest example of these {\em Lagrangian fibrations\/} are elliptic K3 surfaces. In this talk we will explain the role of elliptic K3s in the classification of K3 surfaces, and the (conjectural) generalization to higher dimensions.
Nonlinear diffusion-driven flow in a stratified viscous fluid
15:00 Fri 26 Jun, 2009 :: Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Associate Prof Michael Page :: Monash University

In 1970, two independent studies (by Wunsch and Phillips) of the behaviour of a linear density-stratified viscous fluid in a closed container demonstrated a slow flow can be generated simply due to the container having a sloping boundary surface This remarkable motion is generated as a result of the curvature of the lines of constant density near any sloping surface, which in turn enables a zero normal-flux condition on the density to be satisfied along that boundary. When the Rayleigh number is large (or equivalently Wunsch's parameter $R$ is small) this motion is concentrated in the near vicinity of the sloping surface, in a thin `buoyancy layer' that has many similarities to an Ekman layer in a rotating fluid.

A number of studies have since considered the consequences of this type of `diffusively-driven' flow in a semi-infinite domain, including in the deep ocean and with turbulent effects included. More recently, Page & Johnson (2008) described a steady linear theory for the broader-scale mass recirculation in a closed container and demonstrated that, unlike in previous studies, it is possible for the buoyancy layer to entrain fluid from that recirculation. That work has since been extended (Page & Johnson, 2009) to the nonlinear regime of the problem and some of the similarities to and differences from the linear case will be described in this talk. Simple and elegant analytical solutions in the limit as $R \to 0$ still exist in some situations, and they will be compared with numerical simulations in a tilted square container at small values of $R$. Further work on both the unsteady flow properties and the flow for other geometrical configurations will also be described.

Generalizations of the Stein-Tomas restriction theorem
13:10 Fri 7 Aug, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

The Stein-Tomas restriction theorem says that the Fourier transform of a function in L^p(R^n) restricts to an L^2 function on the unit sphere, for p in some range [1, 2(n+1)/(n+3)]. I will discuss geometric generalizations of this result, by interpreting it as a property of the spectral measure of the Laplace operator on R^n, and then generalizing to the Laplace-Beltrami operator on certain complete Riemannian manifolds. It turns out that dynamical properties of the geodesic flow play a crucial role in determining whether a restriction-type theorem holds for these manifolds.
From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
Defect formulae for integrals of pseudodifferential symbols: applications to dimensional regularisation and index theory
13:10 Fri 4 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Sylvie Paycha :: Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France

The ordinary integral on L^1 functions on R^d unfortunately does not extend to a translation invariant linear form on the whole algebra of pseudodifferential symbols on R^d, forcing to work with ordinary linear extensions which fail to be translation invariant. Defect formulae which express the difference between various linear extensions, show that they differ by local terms involving the noncommutative residue. In particular, we shall show how integrals regularised by a "dimensional regularisation" procedure familiar to physicists differ from Hadamard finite part (or "cut-off" regularised) integrals by a residue. When extended to pseudodifferential operators on closed manifolds, these defect formulae express the zeta regularised traces of a differential operator in terms of a residue of its logarithm. In particular, we shall express the index of a Dirac type operator on a closed manifold in terms of a logarithm of a generalized Laplacian, thus giving an a priori local description of the index and shall discuss further applications.
Irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n)
13:10 Fri 16 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

Berger's classification of irreducibly represented Lie groups that can occur as holonomy groups of semi-Riemannian manifolds is a remarkable result of modern differential geometry. What is remarkable about it is that it is so short and that only so few types of geometry can occur. In Riemannian signature this is even more remarkable, taking into account that any representation of a compact Lie group admits a positive definite invariant scalar product. Hence, for any not too small n there is an abundance of irreducible subgroups of SO(n). We show that in other signatures the situation is quite different with, for example, SO(1,n) having no proper irreducible subgroups. We will show how this and the corresponding result about irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n) follows from the Karpelevich-Mostov theorem. (This is joint work with Antonio J. Di Scala, Politecnico di Torino.)
Analytic torsion for twisted de Rham complexes
13:10 Fri 30 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

We define analytic torsion for the twisted de Rham complex, consisting of differential forms on a compact Riemannian manifold X with coefficients in a flat vector bundle E, with a differential given by a flat connection on E plus a closed odd degree differential form on X. The definition in our case is more complicated than in the case discussed by Ray-Singer, as it uses pseudodifferential operators. We show that this analytic torsion is independent of the choice of metrics on X and E, establish some basic functorial properties, and compute it in many examples. We also establish the relationship of an invariant version of analytic torsion for T-dual circle bundles with closed 3-form flux. This is joint work with Siye Wu.
Eigen-analysis of fluid-loaded compliant panels
15:10 Wed 9 Dec, 2009 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Prof Tony Lucey :: Curtin University of Technology

This presentation concerns the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) that occurs between a fluid flow and an arbitrarily deforming flexible boundary considered to be a flexible panel or a compliant coating that comprises the wetted surface of a marine vehicle. We develop and deploy an approach that is a hybrid of computational and theoretical techniques. The system studied is two-dimensional and linearised disturbances are assumed. Of particular novelty in the present work is the ability of our methods to extract a full set of fluid-structure eigenmodes for systems that have strong spatial inhomogeneity in the structure of the flexible wall.

We first present the approach and some results of the system in which an ideal, zero-pressure gradient, flow interacts with a flexible plate held at both its ends. We use a combination of boundary-element and finite-difference methods to express the FSI system as a single matrix equation in the interfacial variable. This is then couched in state-space form and standard methods used to extract the system eigenvalues. It is then shown how the incorporation of spatial inhomogeneity in the stiffness of the plate can be either stabilising or destabilising. We also show that adding a further restraint within the streamwise extent of a homogeneous panel can trigger an additional type of hydroelastic instability at low flow speeds. The mechanism for the fluid-to-structure energy transfer that underpins this instability can be explained in terms of the pressure-signal phase relative to that of the wall motion and the effect on this relationship of the added wall restraint.

We then show how the ideal-flow approach can be conceptually extended to include boundary-layer effects. The flow field is now modelled by the continuity equation and the linearised perturbation momentum equation written in velocity-velocity form. The near-wall flow field is spatially discretised into rectangular elements on an Eulerian grid and a variant of the discrete-vortex method is applied. The entire fluid-structure system can again be assembled as a linear system for a single set of unknowns - the flow-field vorticity and the wall displacements - that admits the extraction of eigenvalues. We then show how stability diagrams for the fully-coupled finite flow-structure system can be assembled, in doing so identifying classes of wall-based or fluid-based and spatio-temporal wave behaviour.

Hartogs-type holomorphic extensions
13:10 Tue 15 Dec, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Roman Dwilewicz :: Missouri University of Science and Technology

We will review holomorphic extension problems starting with the famous Hartogs extension theorem (1906), via Severi-Kneser-Fichera-Martinelli theorems, up to some recent (partial) results of Al Boggess (Texas A&M Univ.), Zbigniew Slodkowski (Univ. Illinois at Chicago), and the speaker. The holomorphic extension problems for holomorphic or Cauchy-Riemann functions are fundamental problems in complex analysis of several variables. The talk will be very elementary, with many figures, and accessible to graduate and even advanced undergraduate students.
Proper holomorphic maps from strongly pseudoconvex domains to q-convex manifolds
13:10 Fri 5 Feb, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

(Joint work with B. Drinovec Drnovsek, Amer. J. Math., in press.) I will discuss the existence of closed complex subvarieties of a complex manifold X that are proper holomorphic images of strongly pseudoconvex Stein domains. The main sufficient condition is expressed in terms of the Morse indices and of the number of positive Levi eigenvalues of an exhaustion function on X. Examples show that our condition cannot be weakened in general. I will describe optimal results for subvarieties of this type in complements of compact complex submanifolds with Griffiths positive normal bundle; in the projective case these generalize classical theorems of Remmert, Bishop and Narasimhan concerning proper holomorphic maps and embeddings to complex Euclidean spaces.
Conformal structures with G_2 ambient metrics
13:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

The n-sphere considered as a conformal manifold can be viewed as the projectivisation of the light cone in n+2 Minkowski space. A construction that generalises this picture to arbitrary conformal classes is the ambient metric introduced by C. Fefferman and R. Graham. In the talk, I will explain the Fefferman-Graham ambient metric construction and how it detects the existence of certain metrics in the conformal class. Then I will present conformal classes of signature (3,2) for which the 7-dimensional ambient metric has the noncompact exceptional Lie group G_2 as its holonomy. This is joint work with P. Nurowski, Warsaw University.
Topological chaos in two and three dimensions
15:10 Fri 18 Jun, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Matt Finn :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Research into two-dimensional laminar fluid mixing has enjoyed a renaissance in the last decade since the realisation that the Thurston–Nielsen theory of surface homeomorphisms can assist in designing efficient "topologically chaotic" batch mixers. In this talk I will survey some tools used in topological fluid kinematics, including braid groups, train-tracks, dynamical systems and topological index formulae. I will then make some speculations about topological chaos in three dimensions.
On affine BMW algebras
13:10 Fri 25 Jun, 2010 :: Napier 208 :: Prof Arun Ram :: University of Melbourne

I will describe a family of algebras of tangles (which give rise to link invariants following the methods of Reshetikhin-Turaev and Jones) and describe some aspects of their structure and their representation theory. The main goal will be to explain how to use universal Verma modules for the symplectic group to compute the representation theory of affine BMW (Birman-Murakami-Wenzl) algebras.
Eynard-Orantin invariants and enumerative geometry
13:10 Fri 6 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Paul Norbury :: University of Melbourne

As a tool for studying enumerative problems in geometry Eynard and Orantin associate multilinear differentials to any plane curve. Their work comes from matrix models but does not require matrix models (for understanding or calculations). In some sense they describe deformations of complex structures of a curve and conjectural relationships to deformations of Kahler structures of an associated object. I will give an introduction to their invariants via explicit examples, mainly to do with the moduli space of Riemann surfaces, in which the plane curve has genus zero.
A spatial-temporal point process model for fine resolution multisite rainfall data from Roma, Italy
14:10 Thu 19 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: A/Prof Paul Cowpertwait :: Auckland University of Technology

A point process rainfall model is further developed that has storm origins occurring in space-time according to a Poisson process. Each storm origin has a random radius so that storms occur as circular regions in two-dimensional space, where the storm radii are taken to be independent exponential random variables. Storm origins are of random type z, where z follows a continuous probability distribution. Cell origins occur in a further spatial Poisson process and have arrival times that follow a Neyman-Scott point process. Cell origins have random radii so that cells form discs in two-dimensional space. Statistical properties up to third order are derived and used to fit the model to 10 min series taken from 23 sites across the Roma region, Italy. Distributional properties of the observed annual maxima are compared to equivalent values sampled from series that are simulated using the fitted model. The results indicate that the model will be of use in urban drainage projects for the Roma region.
Index theory in the noncommutative world
13:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

The aim of the talk is to give an overview of the noncommutative geometry approach to index theory.
Index theory in Mathematics and Physics
15:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

This lecture is a personal (and partly historical) overview in non-technical terms of the topic described in the title, from first year linear algebra to von Neumann algebras.
A classical construction for simplicial sets revisited
13:10 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Glasgow

Simplicial sets became popular in the 1950s as a combinatorial way to study the homotopy theory of topological spaces. They are more robust than the older notion of simplicial complexes, which were introduced for the same purpose. In this talk, which will be as introductory as possible, we will review some classical functors arising in the theory of simplicial sets, some well-known, some not-so-well-known. We will re-examine the proof of an old theorem of Kan in light of these functors. We will try to keep all jargon to a minimum.
On some applications of higher Quillen K'-theory
13:10 Fri 3 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: University of Adelaide

In my previous talk I introduced a functor from the category of k-algebras (k field) to abelian groups, called KQ-theory. In this talk I will explain its relationship with topological (homological) T-dualities and twisted K-theory.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Dirac operators in geometry, topology, representation theory, and physics
10:00 Mon 18 Oct, 2010 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Dan Freed :: University of Texas, Austin

Lecture Series by Dan Freed (University of Texas, Austin). Dirac introduced his eponymous operator to describe electrons in quantum theory. It was rediscovered by Atiyah and Singer in their study of the index problem on manifolds. In these lectures we explore new theorems and applications. Several of these also involve K-theory in its recent twisted and differential variations. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage: http://www.iga.adelaide.edu.au/workshops/WorkshopOct2010/
Queues with skill based routing under FCFS–ALIS regime
15:10 Fri 11 Feb, 2011 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gideon Weiss :: The University of Haifa, Israel

We consider a system where jobs of several types are served by servers of several types, and a bipartite graph between server types and job types describes feasible assignments. This is a common situation in manufacturing, call centers with skill based routing, matching of parent-child in adoption or matching in kidney transplants etc. We consider the case of first come first served policy: jobs are assigned to the first available feasible server in order of their arrivals. We consider two types of policies for assigning customers to idle servers - a random assignment and assignment to the longest idle server (ALIS) We survey some results for four different situations:

  • For a loss system we find conditions for reversibility and insensitivity.
  • For a manufacturing type system, in which there is enough capacity to serve all jobs, we discuss a product form solution and waiting times.
  • For an infinite matching model in which an infinite sequence of customers of IID types, and infinite sequence of servers of IID types are matched according to first come first, we obtain a product form stationary distribution for this system, which we use to calculate matching rates.
  • For a call center model with overload and abandonments we make some plausible observations.

This talk surveys joint work with Ivo Adan, Rene Caldentey, Cor Hurkens, Ed Kaplan and Damon Wischik, as well as work by Jeremy Visschers, Rishy Talreja and Ward Whitt.

What is a p-adic number?
12:10 Mon 28 Feb, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

The p-adic numbers are: (a) something that visiting seminar speakers invoke when the want to frighten the audience; (b) a fascinating and useful concept in modern algebra; (c) alphabetically just before q-adic numbers? In this talk I hope to convince the audience that option (b) is worth considering. I will begin by reviewing how we get from integers via rational numbers to the real number system. Then we'll look at how this process can be "twisted" to produce something new.
Bioinspired computation in combinatorial optimization: algorithms and their computational complexity
15:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Frank Neumann :: The University of Adelaide

Media...
Bioinspired computation methods, such as evolutionary algorithms and ant colony optimization, are being applied successfully to complex engineering and combinatorial optimization problems. The computational complexity analysis of this type of algorithms has significantly increased the theoretical understanding of these successful algorithms. In this talk, I will give an introduction into this field of research and present some important results that we achieved for problems from combinatorial optimization. These results can also be found in my recent textbook "Bioinspired Computation in Combinatorial Optimization -- Algorithms and Their Computational Complexity".
Tilings in the plane
12:10 Wed 16 Mar, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Susan Barwick :: University of Adelaide

Media...
We show that there are only three regular tilings of the plane, that is, tilings using a regular polygon tile, with tile vertices touching. We also classify the semiregular tilings; tilings using more than one type of regular polygon. These tilings all have many symmetries, in particular, we can translate the tiling, and it still looks the same. Sir Roger Penrose constructed a set of aperiodic tiles; a tiling using these Penrose tiles has no translational symmetry, that is, a translated copy will never match the original. We look at some of the interesting properties of these tiles.
Lattices in exotic groups
15:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

Media...
A lattice in a locally compact group G is a discrete subgroup of cofinite volume. Lattices in Lie groups are well-studied, but little is known about lattices in other, "exotic", locally compact groups. Examples of exotic groups include isometry groups of trees, buildings, polyhedral complexes and CAT(0) spaces, and Kac-Moody groups. We will survey known results, which include both rigidity and surprising examples of flexibility, and discuss the wide range of tools used to investigate lattices in these non-classical settings.
Centres of cyclotomic Hecke algebras
13:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: A/Prof Andrew Francis :: University of Western Sydney

The cyclotomic Hecke algebras, or Ariki-Koike algebras $H(R,q)$, are deformations of the group algebras of certain complex reflection groups $G(r,1,n)$, and also are quotients of the ubiquitous affine Hecke algebra. The centre of the affine Hecke algebra has been understood since Bernstein in terms of the symmetric group action on the weight lattice. In this talk I will discuss the proof that over an arbitrary unital commutative ring $R$, the centre of the affine Hecke algebra maps \emph{onto} the centre of the cyclotomic Hecke algebra when $q-1$ is invertible in $R$. This is the analogue of the fact that the centre of the Hecke algebra of type $A$ is the set of symmetric polynomials in Jucys-Murphy elements (formerly known as he Dipper-James conjecture). Key components of the proof include the relationship between the trace functions on the affine Hecke algebra and on the cyclotomic Hecke algebra, and the link to the affine braid group. This is joint work with John Graham and Lenny Jones.
The Cauchy integral formula
12:10 Mon 9 May, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I will explain a simple method used for calculating the Hilbert transform of an analytic function, and provide some assurance that this isn't a bad thing to do in spite of the somewhat ominous presence of infinite areas. As it turns out this type of integral is not without an application, as will be demonstrated by one application to a problem in fluid mechanics.
Routing in equilibrium
15:10 Tue 21 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Timothy Griffin :: University of Cambridge

Media...
Some path problems cannot be modelled using semirings because the associated algebraic structure is not distributive. Rather than attempting to compute globally optimal paths with such structures, it may be sufficient in some cases to find locally optimal paths --- paths that represent a stable local equilibrium. For example, this is the type of routing system that has evolved to connect Internet Service Providers (ISPs) where link weights implement bilateral commercial relationships between them. Previous work has shown that routing equilibria can be computed for some non-distributive algebras using algorithms in the Bellman-Ford family. However, no polynomial time bound was known for such algorithms. In this talk, we show that routing equilibria can be computed using Dijkstra's algorithm for one class of non-distributive structures. This provides the first polynomial time algorithm for computing locally optimal solutions to path problems.
Object oriented data analysis
14:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Object Oriented Data Analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of Functional Data Analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal components analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie Groups and Symmetric Spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for Object Oriented Data Analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. Even in situations where Euclidean analysis makes sense, there are statistical challenges because of the High Dimension Low Sample Size problem, which motivates a new type of asymptotics leading to non-standard mathematical statistics.
Object oriented data analysis of tree-structured data objects
15:10 Fri 1 Jul, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The field of Object Oriented Data Analysis has made a lot of progress on the statistical analysis of the variation in populations of complex objects. A particularly challenging example of this type is populations of tree-structured objects. Deep challenges arise, which involve a marriage of ideas from statistics, geometry, and numerical analysis, because the space of trees is strongly non-Euclidean in nature. These challenges, together with three completely different approaches to addressing them, are illustrated using a real data example, where each data point is the tree of blood arteries in one person's brain.
Twisted Morava K-theory
13:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

Morava's extraordinary K-theories K(n) are a family of generalized cohomology theories which behave in some ways like K-theory (indeed, K(1) is mod 2 K-theory). Their construction exploits Quillen's description of cobordism in terms of formal group laws and Lubin-Tate's methods in class field theory for constructing abelian extensions of number fields. Constructed from homotopy-theoretic methods, they do not admit a geometric description (like deRham cohomology, K-theory, or cobordism), but are nonetheless subtle, computable invariants of topological spaces. In this talk, I will give an introduction to these theories, and explain how it is possible to define an analogue of twisted K-theory in this setting. Traditionally, K-theory is twisted by a three-dimensional cohomology class; in this case, K(n) admits twists by (n+2)-dimensional classes. This work is joint with Hisham Sati.
Cohomology of higher-rank graphs and twisted C*-algebras
13:10 Fri 16 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

Higher-rank graphs and their $C^*$-algebras were introduced by Kumjian and Pask in 2000. They have provided a rich source of tractable examples of $C^*$-algebras, the most elementary of which are the commutative algebras $C(\mathbb{T}^k)$ of continuous functions on $k$-tori. In this talk we shall describe how to define the homology and cohomology of a higher-rank graph, and how to associate to each higher-rank graph $\Lambda$ and $\mathbb{T}$-valued cocycle on $\Lambda$ a twisted higher-rank graph $C^*$-algebra. As elementary examples, we obtain all noncommutative tori. This is a preleminary report on ongoing joint work with Alex Kumjian and David Pask.
The Makerbot - desktop printing in 3D - and some of the maths that makes it work
12:10 Thu 13 Oct, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Matt Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences

For many years industry has used CNC (computer numerically controlled) machines to craft specialist items. CNC machines traditionally mill out metal objects with arbitrary shapes, but they are expensive, large and dangerous. In recent years a new type of CNC machine has appeared - a 3D printer - which makes 3D objects by printing layers of plastic. These can be made safe, cheap, and small enough to fit on a desktop. I will show off my 3D printer, and explain some of the maths that goes into it.
Dirac operators on classifying spaces
13:10 Fri 28 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

The Dirac operator was introduced by Paul Dirac in 1928 as the formal square root of the D'Alembert operator. Thirty years later it was rediscovered in Euclidean signature by Atiyah and Singer in their seminal work on index theory. In this talk I will describe efforts to construct a Dirac type operator on the classifying space for odd complex K-theory. Ultimately the aim is to produce a projective family of Fredholm operators realising elements in twisted K-theory of a certain moduli stack.
Metric geometry in data analysis
13:10 Fri 11 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Facundo Memoli :: University of Adelaide

The problem of object matching under invariances can be studied using certain tools from metric geometry. The central idea is to regard objects as metric spaces (or metric measure spaces). The type of invariance that one wishes to have in the matching is encoded by the choice of the metrics with which one endows the objects. The standard example is matching objects in Euclidean space under rigid isometries: in this situation one would endow the objects with the Euclidean metric. More general scenarios are possible in which the desired invariance cannot be reflected by the preservation of an ambient space metric. Several ideas due to M. Gromov are useful for approaching this problem. The Gromov-Hausdorff distance is a natural candidate for doing this. However, this metric leads to very hard combinatorial optimization problems and it is difficult to relate to previously reported practical approaches to the problem of object matching. I will discuss different variations of these ideas, and in particular will show a construction of an L^p version of the Gromov-Hausdorff metric, called the Gromov-Wassestein distance, which is based on mass transportation ideas. This new metric directly leads to quadratic optimization problems on continuous variables with linear constraints. As a consequence of establishing several lower bounds, it turns out that several invariants of metric measure spaces turn out to be quantitatively stable in the GW sense. These invariants provide practical tools for the discrimination of shapes and connect the GW ideas to a number of pre-existing approaches.
Stability analysis of nonparallel unsteady flows via separation of variables
15:30 Fri 18 Nov, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Georgy Burde :: Ben-Gurion University

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The problem of variables separation in the linear stability equations, which govern the disturbance behavior in viscous incompressible fluid flows, is discussed. Stability of some unsteady nonparallel three-dimensional flows (exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations) is studied via separation of variables using a semi-analytical, semi-numerical approach. In this approach, a solution with separated variables is defined in a new coordinate system which is sought together with the solution form. As the result, the linear stability problems are reduced to eigenvalue problems for ordinary differential equations which can be solved numerically. In some specific cases, the eigenvalue problems can be solved analytically. Those unique examples of exact (explicit) solution of the nonparallel unsteady flow stability problems provide a very useful test for methods used in the hydrodynamic stability theory. Exact solutions of the stability problems for some stagnation-type flows are presented.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
The Lorentzian conformal analogue of Calabi-Yau manifolds
13:10 Fri 16 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Helga Baum :: Humboldt University

Calabi-Yau manifolds are Riemannian manifolds with holonomy group SU(m). They are Ricci-flat and Kahler and admit a 2-parameter family of parallel spinors. In the talk we will discuss the Lorentzian conformal analogue of this situation. If on a manifold a class of conformally equivalent metrics [g] is given, then one can consider the holonomy group of the conformal manifold (M,[g]), which is a subgroup of O(p+1,q+1) if the metric g has signature (p,q). There is a close relation between algebraic properties of the conformal holonomy group and the existence of Einstein metrics in the conformal class as well as to the existence of conformal Killing spinors. In the talk I will explain classification results for conformal holonomy groups of Lorentzian manifolds. In particular, I will describe Lorentzian manifolds (M,g) with conformal holonomy group SU(1,m), which can be viewed as the conformal analogue of Calabi-Yau manifolds. Such Lorentzian metrics g, known as Fefferman metrics, appear on S^1-bundles over strictly pseudoconvex CR spin manifolds and admit a 2-parameter family of conformal Killing spinors.
The entropy of an overlapping dynamical system
15:10 Fri 23 Mar, 2012 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Michael Barnsley :: Australian National University

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The term "overlapping" refers to a certain fairly simple type of piecewise continuous function from the unit interval to itself and also to a fairly simple type of iterated function system (IFS) on the unit interval. A correspondence between these two classes of objects is used to: 1. find a necessary and sufficient condition for a fractal transformation from the attractor of one overlapping IFS to the attractor of another overlapping IFS to be a homeomorphism and 2. find a formula for the topological entropy of the dynamical system associated with an overlapping function. These results suggest a new method for analysing clocks, weather systems and prime numbers.
New examples of totally disconnected, locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

I will attempt to explain what a totally disconnected, locally compact group is, and then describe some new work with George Willis on an attempt to create new examples based on Baumslag-Solitar groups, which are well known, tried and tested examples/counterexamples in geometric/combinatorial group theory. I will describe how to compute invariants of scale and flat rank for these groups.
Correcting Errors in RSA Private Keys
12:10 Mon 23 Apr, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Wilko Henecka :: University of Adelaide

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Let pk=(N,e) be an RSA public key with corresponding secret key sk=(d,p,q,...). Assume that we obtain partial error-free information of sk, e.g., assume that we obtain half of the most significant bits of p. Then there are well-known algorithms to recover the full secret key. As opposed to these algorithms that allow for correcting erasures of the key sk, we present for the first time a heuristic probabilistic algorithm that is capable of correcting errors in sk provided that e is small. That is, on input of a full but error-prone secret key sk' we reconstruct the original sk by correcting the faults. More precisely, consider an error rate of d in [0,1), where we flip each bit in sk with probability d resulting in an erroneous key sk'. Our Las-Vegas type algorithm allows to recover sk from sk' in expected time polynomial in logN with success probability close to 1, provided that d is strictly less than 0.237. We also obtain a polynomial time Las-Vegas factorization algorithm for recovering the factorization (p,q) from an erroneous version with error rate d strictly less than 0.084.
A Problem of Siegel
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Brent Everitt :: University of York

The first explicit examples of orientable hyperbolic 3-manifolds were constructed by Weber, Siefert, and Lobell in the early 1930's. In the subsequent decades the world of hyperbolic n-manifolds has grown into an extraordinarily rich one. Its sociology is best understood through the eyes of invariants, and for hyperbolic manifolds the most important invariant is volume. Viewed this way the n-dimensional hyperbolic manifolds, for fixed n, look like a well-ordered subset of the reals (a discrete set even, when n is not 3). So we are naturally led to the (manifold) Siegel problem: for a given n, determine the minimum possible volume obtained by an orientable hyperbolic n-manifold. It is a problem with a long and venerable history. In this talk I will describe a unified solution to the problem in low even dimensions, one of which at least is new. Joint work with John Ratcliffe and Steve Tschantz (Vanderbilt).
Index type invariants for twisted signature complexes
13:10 Fri 11 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Atiyah-Patodi-Singer proved an index theorem for non-local boundary conditions in the 1970's that has been widely used in mathematics and mathematical physics. A key application of their theory gives the index theorem for signature operators on oriented manifolds with boundary. As a consequence, they defined certain secondary invariants that were metric independent. I will discuss some recent work with Benameur where we extend the APS theory to signature operators twisted by an odd degree closed differential form, and study the corresponding secondary invariants.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
K-theory and unbounded Fredholm operators
13:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Jerry Kaminker :: University of California, Davis

There are several ways of viewing elements of K^1(X). One of these is via families of unbounded self-adjoint Fredholm operators on X. Each operator will have discrete spectrum, with infinitely many positive and negative eigenvalues of finite multiplicity. One can associate to such a family a geometric object, its graph, and the Chern character and other invariants of the family can be studied from this perspective. By restricting the dimension of the eigenspaces one may sometimes use algebraic topology to completely determine the family up to equivalence. This talk will describe the general framework and some applications to families on low-dimensional manifolds where the methods work well. Various notions related to spectral flow, the index gerbe and Berry phase play roles which will be discussed. This is joint work with Ron Douglas.
Drawing of Viscous Threads with Temperature-dependent Viscosity
14:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North N218 :: Dr Jonathan Wylie :: City University of Hong Kong

The drawing of viscous threads is important in a wide range of industrial applications and is a primary manufacturing process in the optical fiber and textile industries. Most of the materials used in these processes have viscosities that vary extremely strongly with temperature. We investigate the role played by viscous heating in the drawing of viscous threads. Usually, the effects of viscous heating and inertia are neglected because the parameters that characterize them are typically very small. However, by performing a detailed theoretical analysis we surprisingly show that even very small amounts of viscous heating can lead to a runaway phenomena. On the other hand, inertia prevents runaway, and the interplay between viscous heating and inertia results in very complicated dynamics for the system. Even more surprisingly, in the absence of viscous heating, we find that a new type of instability can occur when a thread is heated by a radiative heat source. By analyzing an asymptotic limit of the Navier-Stokes equation we provide a theory that describes the nature of this instability and explains the seemingly counterintuitive behavior.
The fundamental theorems of invariant theory, classical and quantum
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: The University of Sydney

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Let V = C^n, and let (-,-) be a non-degenerate bilinear form on V , which is either symmetric or anti-symmetric. Write G for the isometry group of (V , (-,-)); thus G = O_n (C) or Sp_n (C). The first fundamental theorem (FFT) provides a set of generators for End_G(V^{\otimes r} ) (r = 1, 2, . . . ), while the second fundamental theorem (SFT) gives all relations among the generators. In 1937, Brauer formulated the FFT in terms of his celebrated 'Brauer algebra' B_r (\pm n), but there has hitherto been no similar version of the SFT. One problem has been the generic non-semisimplicity of B_r (\pm n), which caused H Weyl to call it, in his work on invariants 'that enigmatic algebra'. I shall present a solution to this problem, which shows that there is a single idempotent in B_r (\pm n), which describes all the relations. The proof is through a new 'Brauer category', in which the fundamental theorems are easily formulated, and where a calculus of tangles may be used to prove these results. There are quantum analogues of the fundamental theorems which I shall also discuss. There are numerous applications in representation theory, geometry and topology. This is joint work with Ruibin Zhang.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
13:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University, Hannover

Traditionally, the geometric quantisation of an action by a compact Lie group on a compact symplectic manifold is defined as the equivariant index of a certain Dirac operator. This index is a well-defined formal difference of finite-dimensional representations, since the Dirac operator is elliptic and the manifold and the group in question are compact. From a mathematical and physical point of view however, it is very desirable to extend geometric quantisation to noncompact groups and manifolds. Defining a suitable index is much harder in the noncompact setting, but several interesting results in this direction have been obtained. I will review the difficulties connected to noncompact geometric quantisation, and some of the solutions that have been proposed so far, mainly in connection to the "quantisation commutes with reduction" principle. (An introduction to this principle will be given in my talk at the Colloquium on the same day.)
Twisted analytic torsion and adiabatic limits
13:10 Wed 5 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Ryan Mickler :: University of Adelaide

We review Mathai-Wu's recent extension of Ray-Singer analytic torsion to supercomplexes. We explore some new results relating these two torsions, and how we can apply the adiabatic spectral sequence due to Forman and Farber's analytic deformation theory to compute some spectral invariants of the complexes involved, answering some questions that were posed in Mathai-Wu's paper.
Variation of Hodge structure for generalized complex manifolds
13:10 Fri 7 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Dr David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

Generalized complex geometry combines complex and symplectic geometry into a single framework, incorporating also holomorphic Poisson and bi-Hermitian structures. The Dolbeault complex naturally extends to the generalized complex setting giving rise to Hodge structures in twisted cohomology. We consider the variations of Hodge structure and period mappings that arise from families of generalized complex manifolds. As an application we prove a local Torelli theorem for generalized Calabi-Yau manifolds.
Twistor space for rolling bodies
12:10 Fri 15 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Pawel Nurowski :: University of Warsaw

We consider a configuration space of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, and identify it with an open subset U of R^5, equipped with a generic distribution D of 2-planes. We will discuss symmetry properties of the pair (U,D) and will mention that, in the case of the two solids being balls, when changing the ratio of their radii, the dimension of the group of local symmetries unexpectedly jumps from 6 to 14. This occurs for only one such ratio, and in such case the local group of symmetries of the pair (U,D) is maximal. It is maximal not only among the balls with various radii, but more generally among all (U,D)s corresponding to configuration spaces of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting. This maximal group is isomorphic to the split real form of the exceptional Lie group G2. In the remaining part of the talk we argue how to identify the space U from the pair (U,D) defined above with the bundle T of totally null real 2-planes over a 4-manifold equipped with a split signature metric. We call T the twistor bundle for rolling bodies. We show that the rolling distribution D, can be naturally identified with an appropriately defined twistor distribution on T. We use this formulation of the rolling system to find more surfaces which, when rigidly rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, have the local group of symmetries isomorphic to the exceptional group G2.
Neuronal excitability and canards
15:10 Fri 10 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Martin Wechselberger :: University of Sydney

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The notion of excitability was first introduced in an attempt to understand firing properties of neurons. It was Alan Hodgkin who identified three basic types (classes) of excitable axons (integrator, resonator and differentiator) distinguished by their different responses to injected steps of currents of various amplitudes. Pioneered by Rinzel and Ermentrout, bifurcation theory explains repetitive (tonic) firing patterns for adequate steady inputs in integrator (type I) and resonator (type II) neuronal models. In contrast, the dynamic behavior of differentiator (type III) neurons cannot be explained by standard dynamical systems theory. This third type of excitable neuron encodes a dynamic change in the input and leads naturally to a transient response of the neuron. In this talk, I will show that "canards" - peculiar mathematical creatures - are well suited to explain the nature of transient responses of neurons due to dynamic (smooth) inputs. I will apply this geometric theory to a simple driven FitzHugh-Nagumo/Morris-Lecar type neural model and to a more complicated neural model that describes paradoxical excitation due to propofol anesthesia.
A new approach to pointwise heat kernel upper bounds on doubling metric measure spaces
12:10 Fri 7 Jun, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Thierry Coulhon :: Australian National University

On doubling metric measure spaces endowed with a Dirichlet form and satisfying the Davies-Gaffney estimate, we show some characterisations of pointwise upper bounds of the heat kernel in terms of one-parameter weighted inequalities which correspond respectively to the Nash inequality and to a Gagliardo-Nirenberg type inequality when the volume growth is polynomial. This yields a new and simpler proof of the well-known equivalence between classical heat kernel upper bounds and the relative Faber-Krahn inequalities. We are also able to treat more general pointwise estimates where the heat kernel rate of decay is not necessarily governed by the volume growth. This is a joint work with Salahaddine Boutayeb and Adam Sikora.
Subfactors and twisted equivariant K-theory
12:10 Fri 2 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof David E. Evans :: Cardiff University

The most basic structure of chiral conformal field theory (CFT) is the Verlinde ring. Freed-Hopkins-Teleman have expressed the Verlinde ring for the CFTs associated to loop groups as twisted equivariant K-theory. In joint work with Terry Gannon, we build on their work to express K-theoretically the structures of full CFT. In particular, the modular invariant partition functions (which essentially parametrise the possible full CFTs) have a rich interpretation within von Neumann algebras (subfactors), which has led to the developments of structures of full CFT such as the full system (fusion ring of defect lines), nimrep (cylindrical partition function), alpha-induction etc.
The logarithmic singularities of the Green functions of the conformal powers of the Laplacian
11:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

Green functions play an important role in conformal geometry. In this talk, we shall explain how to compute explicitly the logarithmic singularities of the Green functions of the conformal powers of the Laplacian. These operators are the Yamabe and Paneitz operators, as well as the conformal fractional powers of the Laplacian arising from scattering theory for Poincare-Einstein metrics. The results are formulated in terms of Weyl conformal invariants defined via the ambient metric of Fefferman-Graham.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

In this talk we shall report on a program of using the recent framework of twisted spectral triples to study conformal geometry from a noncommutative geometric perspective. One result is a local index formula in conformal geometry taking into account the action of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms. Another result is a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality for twisted spectral triples. Geometric applications include a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality in conformal geometry. There are also noncommutative versions for spectral triples over noncommutative tori and duals of discrete cocompact subgroups of semisimple Lie groups satisfying the Baum-Connes conjecture. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Conformal geometry in four variables and a special geometry in five
12:10 Fri 20 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Dennis The :: Australian National University

Starting with a split signature 4-dimensional conformal manifold, one can build a 5-dimensional bundle over it equipped with a 2-plane distribution. Generically, this is a (2,3,5)-distribution in the sense of Cartan's five variables paper, an aspect that was recently pursued by Daniel An and Pawel Nurowski (finding new examples concerning the geometry of rolling bodies where the (2,3,5)-distribution has G2-symmetry). I shall explain how to understand some elementary aspects of this "twistor construction" from the perspective of parabolic geometry. This is joint work with Michael Eastwood and Katja Sagerschnig.
Symmetry gaps for geometric structures
15:10 Fri 20 Sep, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dennis The :: Australian National University

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Klein's Erlangen program classified geometries based on their (transitive) groups of symmetries, e.g. Euclidean geometry is the quotient of the rigid motion group by the subgroup of rotations. While this perspective is homogeneous, Riemann's generalization of Euclidean geometry is in general very "lumpy" - i.e. there exist Riemannian manifolds that have no symmetries at all. A common generalization where a group still plays a dominant role is Cartan geometry, which first arose in Cartan's solution to the equivalence problem for geometric structures, and which articulates what a "curved version" of a flat (homogeneous) model means. Parabolic geometries are Cartan geometries modelled on (generalized) flag varieties (e.g. projective space, isotropic Grassmannians) which are well-known objects from the representation theory of semisimple Lie groups. These curved versions encompass a zoo of interesting geometries, including conformal, projective, CR, systems of 2nd order ODE, etc. This interaction between differential geometry and representation theory has proved extremely fruitful in recent years. My talk will be an example-based tour of various types of parabolic geometries, which I'll use to outline some of the main aspects of the theory (suppressing technical details). The main thread throughout the talk will be the symmetry gap problem: For a given type of Cartan geometry, the maximal symmetry dimension is realized by the flat model, but what is the next possible ("submaximal") symmetry dimension? I'll sketch a recent solution (in joint work with Boris Kruglikov) for a wide class of parabolic geometries which gives a combinatorial recipe for reading the submaximal symmetry dimension from a Dynkin diagram.
Classification Using Censored Functional Data
15:10 Fri 18 Oct, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Aurore Delaigle :: University of Melbourne

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We consider classification of functional data. This problem has received a lot of attention in the literature in the case where the curves are all observed on the same interval. A difficulty in applications is that the functional curves can be supported on quite different intervals, in which case standard methods of analysis cannot be used. We are interested in constructing classifiers for curves of this type. More precisely, we consider classification of functions supported on a compact interval, in cases where the training sample consists of functions observed on other intervals, which may differ among the training curves. We propose several methods, depending on whether or not the observable intervals overlap by a significant amount. In the case where these intervals differ a lot, our procedure involves extending the curves outside the interval where they were observed. We suggest a new nonparametric approach for doing this. We also introduce flexible ways of combining potential differences in shapes of the curves from different populations, and potential differences between the endpoints of the intervals where the curves from each population are observed.
Localised index and L^2-Lefschetz fixed point formula
12:10 Fri 25 Oct, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

In this talk we introduce a class of localised indices for the Dirac type operators on a complete Riemannian manifold, where a discrete group acts properly, co-compactly and isometrically. These localised indices, generalising the L^2-index of Atiyah, are obtained by taking Hattori-Stallings traces of the higher index for the Dirac type operators. We shall talk about some motivation and applications for working on localised indices. The talk is related to joint work with Bai-Ling Wang.
Braids, conformal module and entropy
12:10 Fri 8 Nov, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Burglind Joricke :: Australian National University

I will discuss two invariants of conjugacy classes of braids. The first invariant is the conformal module which implicitly occurred already in a paper of Gorin and Lin in connection with their interest in Hilbert's 13th problem. The second is a popular dynamical invariant, the entropy. It appeared in connection with Thurston's theory of surface homeomorphisms. It turns out that these invariants are related: They are inversely proportional. In a preparatory talk (at 10:10 am) I will give a brief introduction to some aspects of braid theory and to entropy.
Reductive group actions and some problems concerning their quotients
12:10 Fri 17 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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We will gently introduce the concept of a complex reductive group and the notion of the quotient Z of a complex vector space V on which our complex reductive group G acts linearly. There is the quotient mapping p from V to Z. The quotient is an affine variety with a stratification coming from the group action. Let f be an automorphism of Z. We consider the following questions (and give some answers). 1) Does f preserve the stratification of Z, i.e., does it permute the strata? 2) Is there a lift F of f? This means that F maps V to V and p(F(v))=f(p(v)) for all v in V. 3) Can we arrange that F is equivariant? We show that 1) is almost always true, that 2) is true in a lot of cases and that a twisted version of 3) then holds.
The density property for complex manifolds: a strong form of holomorphic flexibility
12:10 Fri 24 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

Compared with the real differentiable case, complex manifolds in general are more rigid, their groups of holomorphic diffeomorphisms are rather small (in general trivial). A long known exception to this behavior is affine n-space C^n for n at least 2. Its group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is infinite dimensional. In the late 1980s Andersen and Lempert proved a remarkable theorem which stated in its generalized version due to Forstneric and Rosay that any local holomorphic phase flow given on a Runge subset of C^n can be locally uniformly approximated by a global holomorphic diffeomorphism. The main ingredient in the proof was formalized by Varolin and called the density property: The Lie algebra generated by complete holomorphic vector fields is dense in the Lie algebra of all holomorphic vector fields. In these manifolds a similar local to global approximation of Andersen-Lempert type holds. It is a precise way of saying that the group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is large. In the talk we will explain how this notion is related to other more recent flexibility notions in complex geometry, in particular to the notion of a Oka-Forstneric manifold. We will give examples of manifolds with the density property and sketch applications of the density property. If time permits we will explain criteria for the density property developed by Kaliman and the speaker.
Holomorphic null curves and the conformal Calabi-Yau problem
12:10 Tue 28 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

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I shall describe how methods of complex analysis can be used to give new results on the conformal Calabi-Yau problem concerning the existence of bounded metrically complete minimal surfaces in real Euclidean 3-space R^3. We shall see in particular that every bordered Riemann surface admits a proper complete holomorphic immersion into the ball of C^2, and a proper complete embedding as a holomorphic null curve into the ball of C^3. Since the real and the imaginary parts of a holomorphic null curve in C^3 are conformally immersed minimal surfaces in R^3, we obtain a bounded complete conformal minimal immersion of any bordered Riemann surface into R^3. The main advantage of our methods, when compared to the existing ones in the literature, is that we do not need to change the conformal type of the Riemann surface. (Joint work with A. Alarcon, University of Granada.)
The structuring role of chaotic stirring on pelagic ecosystems
11:10 Fri 28 Feb, 2014 :: B19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Francesco d'Ovidio :: Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI)

The open ocean upper layer is characterized by a complex transport dynamics occuring over different spatiotemporal scales. At the scale of 10-100 km - which covers the so called mesoscale and part of the submesoscale - in situ and remote sensing observations detect strong variability in physical and biogeochemical fields like sea surface temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll concentration. The calculation of Lyapunov exponent and other nonlinear diagnostics applied to the surface currents have allowed to show that an important part of this tracer variability is due to chaotic stirring. Here I will extend this analysis to marine ecosystems. For primary producers, I will show that stable and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic points embedded in the surface velocity field are able to structure the phytoplanktonic community in fluid dynamical niches of dominant types, where competition can locally occur during bloom events. By using data from tagged whales, frigatebirds, and elephant seals, I will also show that chaotic stirring affects the behaviour of higher trophic levels. In perspective, these relations between transport structures and marine ecosystems can be the base for a biodiversity index constructued from satellite information, and therefore able to monitor key aspects of the marine biodiversity and its temporal variability at the global scale.
Moduli spaces of contact instantons
12:10 Fri 28 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

In dimensions greater than four there are several notions of higher Yang-Mills instantons. This talk concerns one such case, contact instantons, defined for 5-dimensional contact manifolds. The geometry transverse to the Reeb foliation turns out to be important in understanding the moduli space. For example, we show the dimension of the moduli space is the index of a transverse elliptic complex. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati.
A generalised Kac-Peterson cocycle
11:10 Thu 17 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

The Kac-Peterson cocycle appears in the study of highest weight modules of infinite dimensional Lie algebras and determines a central extension. The vanishing of its cohomology class is tied to the existence of a cubic Dirac operator whose square is a quadratic Casimir element. I will introduce a closely related Lie algebra cocycle that comes about when constructing spin representations and gives rise to a Banach Lie group with a highly nontrivial topology. I will also explain how to make sense of the cubic Dirac operator in this setting and discuss its relation to twisted K-theory. This is joint work with Jouko Mickelsson.
Optimal transportation and Monge-Ampere type equation
15:10 Fri 13 Jun, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Xu-Jia Wang :: Centre for Mathematics and its Applications, Australian National University

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The optimal transportation is to find an optimal mapping of transferring one mass density to another one such that the total cost is minimised. This problem was first introduced by Monge in 1781. Monge's cost function is propositional to the distance the mass is transferred, namely c(x,y)=|x-y|, but more general costs are allowed. The optimal transportation has found a variety of applications and has been extensively studied since then. In 1940s Kantorovich introduced a dual functional, by which one can determine the optimal mapping through the associated potential function, for a large class of cost functions. The potential function satisfies a Monge-Ampere type equation, which is a fully nonlinear partial differential equation arising also in geometric problems related to the Gauss curvature, and has been studied by Aleksandrov, Calabi, Nirenberg, Pogorelov, Cheng-Yau, and Caffarelli, among many others. In this talk we will first introduce the optimal transportation and review the existence of optimal mappings. We then focus on the regularity of the optimal mappings. By studying the associated Monge-Ampere equation, sharp conditions on the cost function have been found by the speaker and his collaborators. For Monge's cost function |x-y|, which does not satisfy the sharp conditions, we have also obtained the existence of optimal mappings, and established interesting regularity and singularity results for the mapping.
The Bismut-Chern character as dimension reduction functor and its twisting
12:10 Fri 4 Jul, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Fei Han :: National University of Singapore

The Bismut-Chern character is a loop space refinement of the Chern character. It plays an essential role in the interpretation of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem from the point of view of loop space. In this talk, I will first briefly review the construction of the Bismut-Chern character and show how it can be viewed as a dimension reduction functor in the Stolz-Teichner program on supersymmetric quantum field theories. I will then introduce the construction of the twisted Bismut-Chern character, which represents our joint work with Varghese Mathai.
Modelling the mean-field behaviour of cellular automata
12:10 Mon 4 Aug, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kale Davies :: University of Adelaide

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Cellular automata (CA) are lattice-based models in which agents fill the lattice sites and behave according to some specified rule. CA are particularly useful when modelling cell behaviour and as such many people consider CA model in which agents undergo motility and proliferation type events. We are particularly interested in predicting the average behaviour of these models. In this talk I will show how a system of differential equations can be derived for the system and discuss the difficulties that arise in even the seemingly simple case of a CA with motility and proliferation.
Spherical T-duality
01:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

I will talk on a new variant of T-duality, called spherical T-duality, which relates pairs of the form (P,H) consisting of a principal SU(2)-bundle P --> M and a 7-cocycle H on P. Intuitively spherical T-duality exchanges H with the second Chern class c_2(P). This is precisely true when M is compact oriented and dim(M) is at most 4. When M is higher dimensional, not all pairs (P,H) admit spherical T-duals and even when they exist, the spherical T-duals are not always unique. We will try and explain this phenomenon. Nonetheless, we prove that all spherical T-dualities induce a degree-shifting isomorphism on the 7-twisted cohomologies of the bundles and, when dim(M) is at most 7, also their integral twisted cohomologies and, when dim(M) is at most 4, even their 7-twisted K-theories. While the complete physical relevance of spherical T-duality is still being explored, it does provide an identification between conserved charges in certain distinct IIB supergravity and string compactifications. This is joint work with Peter Bouwknegt and Jarah Evslin.
The FKMM invariant in low dimension
12:10 Fri 12 Sep, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Kiyonori Gomi (Shinshu University)

On a space with involutive action, the natural notion of vector bundles is equivariant vector bundles. But, there is an important variant called `Real' vector bundles in the sense of Atiyah, and, its cousin, `symplectic' or `Quaternionic' vector bundles in the sense of Dupont. The FKMM invariant is an invariant of `symplectic' vector bundles originally introduced by Furuta, Kametani, Matsue and Minami. The subject of my talk is recent development of this invariant in my joint work with Giuseppe De Nittis: The classifications of `symplectic' vector bundles in low dimension and the descriptions of some Z/2-invariants by using the FKMM invariant.
Exploration vs. Exploitation with Partially Observable Gaussian Autoregressive Arms
15:00 Mon 29 Sep, 2014 :: Engineering North N132 :: Julia Kuhn :: The University of Queensland & The University of Amsterdam

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We consider a restless bandit problem with Gaussian autoregressive arms, where the state of an arm is only observed when it is played and the state-dependent reward is collected. Since arms are only partially observable, a good decision policy needs to account for the fact that information about the state of an arm becomes more and more obsolete while the arm is not being played. Thus, the decision maker faces a tradeoff between exploiting those arms that are believed to be currently the most rewarding (i.e. those with the largest conditional mean), and exploring arms with a high conditional variance. Moreover, one would like the decision policy to remain tractable despite the infinite state space and also in systems with many arms. A policy that gives some priority to exploration is the Whittle index policy, for which we establish structural properties. These motivate a parametric index policy that is computationally much simpler than the Whittle index but can still outperform the myopic policy. Furthermore, we examine the many-arm behavior of the system under the parametric policy, identifying equations describing its asymptotic dynamics. Based on these insights we provide a simple heuristic algorithm to evaluate the performance of index policies; the latter is used to optimize the parametric index.
Optimally Chosen Quadratic Forms for Partitioning Multivariate Data
13:10 Tue 14 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Assoc. Prof. Inge Koch :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Quadratic forms are commonly used in linear algebra. For d-dimensional vectors they have a matrix representation, Q(x) = x'Ax, for some symmetric matrix A. In statistics quadratic forms are defined for d-dimensional random vectors, and one of the best-known quadratic forms is the Mahalanobis distance of two random vectors. In this talk we want to partition a quadratic form Q(X) = X'MX, where X is a random vector, and M a symmetric matrix, that is, we want to find a d-dimensional random vector W such that Q(X) = W'W. This problem has many solutions. We are interested in a solution or partition W of X such that pairs of corresponding variables (X_j, W_j) are highly correlated and such that W is simpler than the given X. We will consider some natural candidates for W which turn out to be suboptimal in the sense of the above constraints, and we will then exhibit the optimal solution. Solutions of this type are useful in the well-known T-square statistic. We will see in examples what these solutions look like.
Geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory to study travelling waves in: 1) a model for tumor invasion; and 2) a model for wound healing angiogenesis.
15:10 Fri 17 Oct, 2014 :: EM 218 Engineering & Mathematics Building :: Dr Petrus (Peter) van Heijster :: QUT

In this talk, I will present results on the existence of smooth and shock-like travelling wave solutions for two advection-reaction-diffusion models. The first model describes malignant tumour (i.e. skin cancer) invasion, while the second one is a model for wound healing angiogenesis. Numerical solutions indicate that both smooth and shock-fronted travelling wave solutions exist for these two models. I will verify the existence of both type of these solutions using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory. Moreover, I will provide numerical results on the stability of the waves and the actual observed wave speeds. This is joint work with K. Harley, G. Pettet, R. Marangell and M. Wechselberger.
Factorisations of Distributive Laws
12:10 Fri 19 Dec, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Paul Slevin :: University of Glasgow

Recently, distributive laws have been used by Boehm and Stefan to construct new examples of duplicial (paracyclic) objects, and hence cyclic homology theories. The paradigmatic example of such a theory is the cyclic homology HC(A) of an associative algebra A. It was observed by Kustermans, Murphy, and Tuset that the functor HC can be twisted by automorphisms of A. It turns out that this twisting procedure can be applied to any duplicial object defined by a distributive law. I will begin by defining duplicial objects and cyclic homology, as well as discussing some categorical concepts, then describe the construction of Boehm and Stefan. I will then define the category of factorisations of a distributive law and explain how this acts on their construction, and give some examples, making explicit how the action of this category generalises the twisting of an associative algebra.
Singular Pfaffian systems in dimension 6
12:10 Fri 20 Mar, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Pawel Nurowski :: Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences

We consider a pair of rank 3 distributions in dimension 6 with some remarkable properties. They define an analog of the celebrated nearly-Kahler structure on the 6 sphere, with the exceptional simple Lie group G2 as a group of symmetries. In our case the metric associated with the structure is pseudo-Riemannian, of split signature. The 6 manifold has a 5-dimensional boundary with interesting induced geometry. This structure on the boundary has no analog in the Riemannian case.
The twistor equation on Lorentzian Spin^c manifolds
12:10 Fri 15 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Andree Lischewski :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I consider a conformally covariant spinor field equation, called the twistor equation, which can be formulated on any Lorentzian Spin^c manifold. Its solutions have become of importance in the study of supersymmetric field theories in recent years and were named "charged conformal Killing spinors". After a short review of conformal Spin^c geometry in Lorentzian signature, I will briefly discuss the emergence of charged conformal Killing spinors in supergravity. I will then focus on special geometric structures related to the twistor equation and use charged conformal Killing spinors in order to establish a link between conformal and CR geometry.
Instantons and Geometric Representation Theory
12:10 Thu 23 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Professor Richard Szabo :: Heriot-Watt University

We give an overview of the various approaches to studying supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on ALE spaces, and their conjectural connections to two-dimensional conformal field theory via AGT-type dualities. From a mathematical perspective, this is formulated as a relationship between the equivariant cohomology of certain moduli spaces of sheaves on stacks and the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras. We introduce an orbifold compactification of the minimal resolution of the A-type toric singularity in four dimensions, and then construct a moduli space of framed sheaves which is conjecturally isomorphic to a Nakajima quiver variety. We apply this construction to derive relations between the equivariant cohomology of these moduli spaces and the representation theory of the affine Lie algebra of type A.
Dirac operators and Hamiltonian loop group action
12:10 Fri 24 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Yanli Song :: University of Toronto

A definition to the geometric quantization for compact Hamiltonian G-spaces is given by Bott, defined as the index of the Spinc-Dirac operator on the manifold. In this talk, I will explain how to generalize this idea to the Hamiltonian LG-spaces. Instead of quantizing infinite-dimensional manifolds directly, we use its equivalent finite-dimensional model, the quasi-Hamiltonian G-spaces. By constructing twisted spinor bundle and twisted pre-quantum bundle on the quasi-Hamiltonian G-space, we define a Dirac operator whose index are given by positive energy representation of loop groups. A key role in the construction will be played by the algebraic cubic Dirac operator for loop algebra. If time permitted, I will also explain how to prove the quantization commutes with reduction theorem for Hamiltonian LG-spaces under this framework.
Workshop on Geometric Quantisation
10:10 Mon 27 Jul, 2015 :: Level 7 conference room Ingkarni Wardli :: Michele Vergne, Weiping Zhang, Eckhard Meinrenken, Nigel Higson and many others

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Geometric quantisation has been an increasingly active area since before the 1980s, with links to physics, symplectic geometry, representation theory, index theory, and differential geometry and geometric analysis in general. In addition to its relevance as a field on its own, it acts as a focal point for the interaction between all of these areas, which has yielded far-reaching and powerful results. This workshop features a large number of international speakers, who are all well-known for their work in (differential) geometry, representation theory and/or geometric analysis. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in these areas to meet and learn from some of the top mathematicians in the world. Students are especially welcome. Registration is free.
Quantising proper actions on Spin-c manifolds
11:00 Fri 31 Jul, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli Level 7 Room 7.15 :: Peter Hochs :: The University of Adelaide

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For a proper action by a Lie group on a Spin-c manifold (both of which may be noncompact), we study an index of deformations of the Spin-c Dirac operator, acting on the space of spinors invariant under the group action. When applied to spinors that are square integrable transversally to orbits in a suitable sense, the kernel of this operator turns out to be finite-dimensional, under certain hypotheses of the deformation. This also allows one to show that the index has the quantisation commutes with reduction property (as proved by Meinrenken in the compact symplectic case, and by Paradan-Vergne in the compact Spin-c case), for sufficiently large powers of the determinant line bundle. Furthermore, this result extends to Spin-c Dirac operators twisted by vector bundles. A key ingredient of the arguments is the use of a family of inner products on the Lie algebra, depending on a point in the manifold. This is joint work with Mathai Varghese.
Locally homogeneous pp-waves
12:10 Fri 6 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Thomas Leistner :: The University of Adelaide

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For a certain type of Lorentzian manifolds, the so-called pp-waves, we study the conditions implied on the curvature by local homogeneity of the metric. We show that under some mild genericity assumptions, these conditions are quite strong, forcing the pp-wave to be a plane wave, and yielding a classification of homogeneous pp-waves. This also leads to a generalisation of a classical result by Jordan, Ehlers and Kundt about vacuum pp-waves in dimension 4 to arbitrary dimensions. Several examples show that our genericity assumptions are essential. This is joint work with W. Globke.
A long C^2 without holomorphic functions
12:10 Fri 29 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

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For every integer n>1 we construct a complex manifold of dimension n which is exhausted by an increasing sequence of biholomorphic images of C^n (i.e., a long C^n), but it does not admit any nonconstant holomorphic functions. We also introduce new biholomorphic invariants of a complex manifold, the stable core and the strongly stable core, and we prove that every compact strongly pseudoconvex and polynomially convex domain B in C^n is the strongly stable core of a long C^n; in particular, non-equivalent domains give rise to non-equivalent long C^n's. Thus, for any n>1 there exist uncountably many pairwise non-equivalent long C^n's. These results answer several long standing open questions. (Joint work with Luka Boc Thaler.)
A fixed point theorem on noncompact manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide / Radboud University

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For an elliptic operator on a compact manifold acted on by a compact Lie group, the Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point formula expresses its equivariant index in terms of data on fixed point sets of group elements. This can for example be used to prove Weyl’s character formula. We extend the definition of the equivariant index to noncompact manifolds, and prove a generalisation of the Atiyah-Segal-Singer formula, for group elements with compact fixed point sets. In one example, this leads to a relation with characters of discrete series representations of semisimple Lie groups. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Chern-Simons invariants of Seifert manifolds via Loop spaces
14:10 Tue 28 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Ryan Mickler :: Northeastern University

Over the past 30 years the Chern-Simons functional for connections on G-bundles over three-manfolds has lead to a deep understanding of the geometry of three-manfiolds, as well as knot invariants such as the Jones polynomial. Here we study this functional for three-manfolds that are topologically given as the total space of a principal circle bundle over a compact Riemann surface base, which are known as Seifert manifolds. We show that on such manifolds the Chern-Simons functional reduces to a particular gauge-theoretic functional on the 2d base, that describes a gauge theory of connections on an infinite dimensional bundle over this base with structure group given by the level-k affine central extension of the loop group LG. We show that this formulation gives a new understanding of results of Beasley-Witten on the computability of quantum Chern-Simons invariants of these manifolds as well as knot invariants for knots that wrap a single fiber of the circle bundle. A central tool in our analysis is the Caloron correspondence of Murray-Stevenson-Vozzo.
Twists over etale groupoids and twisted vector bundles
12:10 Fri 22 Jul, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Elizabeth Gillaspy :: University of Colorado, Boulder

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Given a twist over an etale groupoid, one can construct an associated C*-algebra which carries a good deal of geometric and physical meaning; for example, the K-theory group of this C*-algebra classifies D-brane charges in string theory. Twisted vector bundles, when they exist, give rise to particularly important elements in this K-theory group. In this talk, we will explain how to use the classifying space of the etale groupoid to construct twisted vector bundles, under some mild hypotheses on the twist and the classifying space. My hope is that this talk will be accessible to a broad audience; in particular, no prior familiarity with groupoids, their twists, or the associated C*-algebras will be assumed. This is joint work with Carla Farsi.
Calculus on symplectic manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Aug, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mike Eastwood :: University of Adelaide

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One can use the symplectic form to construct an elliptic complex replacing the de Rham complex. Then, under suitable curvature conditions, one can form coupled versions of this complex. Finally, on complex projective space, these constructions give rise to a series of elliptic complexes with geometric consequences for the Fubini-Study metric and its X-ray transform. This talk, which will start from scratch, is based on the work of many authors but, especially, current joint work with Jan Slovak.
Product Hardy spaces associated to operators with heat kernel bounds on spaces of homogeneous type
12:10 Fri 19 Aug, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Lesley Ward :: University of South Australia

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Much effort has been devoted to generalizing the Calder'on-Zygmund theory in harmonic analysis from Euclidean spaces to metric measure spaces, or spaces of homogeneous type. Here the underlying space R^n with Euclidean metric and Lebesgue measure is replaced by a set X with general metric or quasi-metric and a doubling measure. Further, one can replace the Laplacian operator that underpins the Calderon-Zygmund theory by more general operators L satisfying heat kernel estimates. I will present recent joint work with P. Chen, X.T. Duong, J. Li and L.X. Yan along these lines. We develop the theory of product Hardy spaces H^p_{L_1,L_2}(X_1 x X_2), for 1
Geometry of pseudodifferential algebra bundles
12:10 Fri 16 Sep, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

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I will motivate the construction of pseudodifferential algebra bundles arising in index theory, and also outline the construction of general pseudodifferential algebra bundles (and the associated sphere bundles), showing that there are many that are purely infinite dimensional that do not come from usual constructions in index theory. I will also discuss characteristic classes of such bundles. This is joint work with Richard Melrose.
Hilbert schemes of points of some surfaces and quiver representations
12:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Ugo Bruzzo :: International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste

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Hilbert schemes of points on the total spaces of the line bundles O(-n) on P1 (desingularizations of toric singularities of type (1/n)(1,1)) can be given an ADHM description, and as a result, they can be realized as varieties of quiver representations.
Character Formula for Discrete Series
12:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

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Weyl character formula describes characters of irreducible representations of compact Lie groups. This formula can be obtained using geometric method, for example, from the Atiyah-Bott fixed point theorem or the Atiyah-Segal-Singer index theorem. Harish-Chandra character formula, the noncompact analogue of the Weyl character formula, can also be studied from the point of view of index theory. We apply orbital integrals on K-theory of Harish-Chandra Schwartz algebra of a semisimple Lie group G, and then use geometric method to deduce Harish-Chandra character formulas for discrete series representations of G. This is work in progress with Peter Hochs.
What is index theory?
12:10 Tue 21 Mar, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Index theory is a link between topology, geometry and analysis. A typical theorem in index theory says that two numbers are equal: an analytic index and a topological index. The first theorem of this kind was the index theorem of Atiyah and Singer, which they proved in 1963. Index theorems have many applications in maths and physics. For example, they can be used to prove that a differential equation must have a solution. Also, they imply that the topology of a space like a sphere or a torus determines in what ways it can be curved. Topology is the study of geometric properties that do not change if we stretch or compress a shape without cutting or glueing. Curvature does change when we stretch something out, so it is surprising that topology can say anything about curvature. Index theory has many surprising consequences like this.
Hyperbolic geometry and knots
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: A/Prof Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

It has been known since the early 1980s that the complement of a knot or link decomposes into geometric pieces, and the most common geometry is hyperbolic. However, the connections between hyperbolic geometry and other knot and link invariants are not well-understood. Conjectured connections have applications to quantum topology and physics, 3-manifold geometry and topology, and knot theory. In this talk, we will describe several results relating the hyperbolic geometry of a knot or link to other invariants, and their implications.
Real bundle gerbes
12:10 Fri 19 May, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Michael Murray :: University of Adelaide

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Bundle gerbe modules, via the notion of bundle gerbe K-theory provide a realisation of twisted K-theory. I will discuss the existence or Real bundle gerbes which are the corresponding objects required to construct Real twisted K-theory in the sense of Atiyah. This is joint work with Richard Szabo (Heriot-Watt), Pedram Hekmati (Auckland) and Raymond Vozzo which appeared in arXiv:1608.06466.
Schubert Calculus on Lagrangian Grassmannians
12:10 Tue 23 May, 2017 :: EM 213 :: Hiep Tuan Dang :: National centre for theoretical sciences, Taiwan

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The Lagrangian Grassmannian $LG = LG(n,2n)$ is the projective complex manifold which parametrizes Lagrangian (i.e. maximal isotropic) subspaces in a symplective vector space of dimension $2n$. This talk is mainly devoted to Schubert calculus on $LG$. We first recall the definition of Schubert classes in this context. Then we present basic results which are similar to the classical formulas due to Pieri and Giambelli. These lead to a presentation of the cohomology ring of $LG$. Finally, we will discuss recent results related to the Schubert structure constants and Gromov-Witten invariants of $LG$.
Conway's Rational Tangle
12:10 Tue 15 Aug, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Hang Wang :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Many researches in mathematics essentially feature some classification problems. In this context, invariants are created in order to associate algebraic quantities, such as numbers and groups, to elements of interested classes of geometric objects, such as surfaces. A key property of an invariant is that it does not change under ``allowable moves'' which can be specified in various geometric contexts. We demonstrate these lines of ideas by rational tangles, a notion in knot theory. A tangle is analogous to a link except that it has free ends. Conway's rational tangles are the simplest tangles that can be ``unwound'' under a finite sequence of two simple moves, and they arise as building blocks for knots. A numerical invariant will be introduced for Conway's rational tangles and it provides the only known example of a complete invariant in knot theory.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 18 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

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A pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous space $M$ of finite volume can be presented as $M=G/H$, where $G$ is a Lie group acting transitively and isometrically on $M$, and $H$ is a closed subgroup of $G$. The condition that $G$ acts isometrically and thus preserves a finite measure on $M$ leads to strong algebraic restrictions on $G$. In the special case where $G$ has no compact semisimple normal subgroups, it turns out that the isotropy subgroup $H$ is a lattice, and that the metric on $M$ comes from a bi-invariant metric on $G$. This result allows us to recover Zeghib’s classification of Lorentzian compact homogeneous spaces, and to move towards a classification for metric index 2. As an application we can investigate which pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces of finite volume are Einstein spaces. Through the existence questions for lattice subgroups, this leads to an interesting connection with the theory of transcendental numbers, which allows us to characterize the Einstein cases in low dimensions. This talk is based on joint works with Oliver Baues, Yuri Nikolayevsky and Abdelghani Zeghib.
Time-reversal symmetric topology from physics
12:10 Fri 25 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: University of Adelaide

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Time-reversal plays a crucial role in experimentally discovered topological insulators (2008) and semimetals (2015). This is mathematically interesting because one is forced to use "Quaternionic" characteristic classes and differential topology --- a previously ill-motivated generalisation. Guided by physical intuition, an equivariant Poincare-Lefschetz duality, Euler structures, and a new type of monopole with torsion charge, will be introduced.
Topology as a tool in algebra
15:10 Fri 8 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Zsuzsanna Dancso :: University of Sydney

Topologists often use algebra in order to understand the shape of a space: invariants such as homology and cohomology are basic, and very successful, examples of this principle. Although topology is used as a tool in algebra less often, I will describe a recurring pattern on the border of knot theory and quantum algebra where this is possible. We will explore how the tangled topology of "flying circles in R^3" is deeply related to a famous problem in Lie theory: the Kashiwara-Vergne (KV) problem (first solved in 2006 by Alekseev-Meinrenken). I will explain how this relationship illuminates the intricate algebra of the KV problem.
End-periodic K-homology and spin bordism
12:10 Fri 20 Oct, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Michael Hallam :: University of Adelaide

This talk introduces new "end-periodic" variants of geometric K-homology and spin bordism theories that are tailored to a recent index theorem for even-dimensional manifolds with periodic ends. This index theorem, due to Mrowka, Ruberman and Saveliev, is a generalisation of the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem for manifolds with odd-dimensional boundary. As in the APS index theorem, there is an (end-periodic) eta invariant that appears as a correction term for the periodic end. Invariance properties of the standard relative eta invariants are elegantly expressed using K-homology and spin bordism, and this continues to hold in the end-periodic case. In fact, there are natural isomorphisms between the standard K-homology/bordism theories and their end-periodic versions, and moreover these isomorphisms preserve relative eta invariants. The study is motivated by results on positive scalar curvature, namely obstructions and distinct path components of the moduli space of PSC metrics. Our isomorphisms provide a systematic method for transferring certain results on PSC from the odd-dimensional case to the even-dimensional case. This work is joint with Mathai Varghese.
How oligomerisation impacts steady state gradient in a morphogen-receptor system
15:10 Fri 20 Oct, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Mr Phillip Brown :: University of Adelaide

In developmental biology an important process is cell fate determination, where cells start to differentiate their form and function. This is an element of the broader concept of morphogenesis. It has long been held that cell differentiation can occur by a chemical signal providing positional information to 'undecided' cells. This chemical produces a gradient of concentration that indicates to a cell what path it should develop along. More recently it has been shown that in a particular system of this type, the chemical (protein) does not exist purely as individual molecules, but can exist in multi-protein complexes known as oligomers. Mathematical modelling has been performed on systems of oligomers to determine if this concept can produce useful gradients of concentration. However, there are wide range of possibilities when it comes to how oligomer systems can be modelled and most of them have not been explored. In this talk I will introduce a new monomer system and analyse it, before extending this model to include oligomers. A number of oligomer models are proposed based on the assumption that proteins are only produced in their oligomer form and can only break apart once they have left the producing cell. It will be shown that when oligomers are present under these conditions, but only monomers are permitted to bind with receptors, then the system can produce robust, biologically useful gradients for a significantly larger range of model parameters (for instance, degradation, production and binding rates) compared to the monomer system. We will also show that when oligomers are permitted to bind with receptors there is negligible difference compared to the monomer system.
Index of Equivariant Callias-Type Operators
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hao Guo :: University of Adelaide

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Suppose M is a smooth Riemannian manifold on which a Lie group G acts properly and isometrically. In this talk I will explore properties of a particular class of G-invariant operators on M, called G-Callias-type operators. These are Dirac operators that have been given an additional Z_2-grading and a perturbation so as to be "invertible outside of a cocompact set in M". It turns out that G-Callias-type operators are equivariantly Fredholm and so have an index in the K-theory of the maximal group C*-algebra of G. This index can be expressed as a KK-product of a class in K-homology and a class in the K-theory of the Higson G-corona. In fact, one can show that the K-theory of the Higson G-corona is highly non-trivial, and thus the index theory of G-Callias-type operators is not obviously trivial. As an application of the index theory of G-Callias-type operators, I will mention an obstruction to the existence of G-invariant metrics of positive scalar curvature on M.
Knot homologies
15:10 Fri 4 May, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Dr Anthony Licata :: Australian National University

The last twenty years have seen a lot of interaction between low-dimensional topology and representation theory. One facet of this interaction concerns "knot homologies," which are homological invariants of knots; the most famous of these, Khovanov homology, comes from the higher representation theory of sl_2. The goal of this talk will be to give a gentle introduction to this subject to non-experts by telling you a bit about Khovanov homology.
Modelling phagocytosis
15:10 Fri 25 May, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Prof Ngamta (Natalie) Thamwattana :: University of Wollongong

Phagocytosis refers to a process in which one cell type fully encloses and consumes unwanted cells, debris or particulate matter. It plays an important role in immune systems through the destruction of pathogens and the inhibiting of cancerous cells. In this study, we combine models on cell-cell adhesion and on predator-prey modelling to generate a new model for phagocytosis that is capable of relating the interaction between cells in both space and time. Numerical results are presented, demonstrating the behaviours of cells during the process of phagocytosis.
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.
Topological Data Analysis
15:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: Dr Vanessa Robins :: Australian National University

Topological Data Analysis has grown out of work focussed on deriving qualitative and yet quantifiable information about the shape of data. The underlying assumption is that knowledge of shape - the way the data are distributed - permits high-level reasoning and modelling of the processes that created this data. The 0-th order aspect of shape is the number pieces: "connected components" to a topologist; "clustering" to a statistician. Higher-order topological aspects of shape are holes, quantified as "non-bounding cycles" in homology theory. These signal the existence of some type of constraint on the data-generating process. Homology lends itself naturally to computer implementation, but its naive application is not robust to noise. This inspired the development of persistent homology: an algebraic topological tool that measures changes in the topology of a growing sequence of spaces (a filtration). Persistent homology provides invariants called the barcodes or persistence diagrams that are sets of intervals recording the birth and death parameter values of each homology class in the filtration. It captures information about the shape of data over a range of length scales, and enables the identification of "noisy" topological structure. Statistical analysis of persistent homology has been challenging because the raw information (the persistence diagrams) are provided as sets of intervals rather than functions. Various approaches to converting persistence diagrams to functional forms have been developed recently, and have found application to data ranging from the distribution of galaxies, to porous materials, and cancer detection.
Interactive theorem proving for mathematicians
15:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

Mathematicians use computers to write their proofs (LaTeX), and to do their calculations (Sage, Mathematica, Maple, Matlab, etc, as well as custom code for simulations or searches). However today we rarely use computers to help us to construct and understand proofs. There is a long tradition in computer science of interactive and automatic theorem proving; particularly today these are important tools in engineering correct software, as well as in optimisation and compilation. There have been some notable examples of formalisation of modern mathematics (e.g. the odd order theorem, the Kepler conjecture, and the four-colour theorem). Even in these cases, huge engineering efforts were required to translate the mathematics to a form a computer could understand. Moreover, in most areas of research there is a huge gap between the interests of human mathematicians and the abilities of computer provers. Nevertheless, I think it's time for mathematicians to start getting interested in interactive theorem provers! It's now possible to write proofs, and write tools that help write proofs, in languages which are expressive enough to encompass most of modern mathematics, and ergonomic enough to use for general purpose programming. I'll give an informal introduction to dependent type theory (the logical foundation of many modern theorem provers), some examples of doing mathematics in such a system, and my experiences working with mathematics students in these systems.
Twisted K-theory of compact Lie groups and extended Verlinde algebras
11:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

In a series of recent papers, Freed, Hopkins and Teleman put forth a deep result which identifies the twisted K -theory of a compact Lie group G with the representation theory of its loop group LG. Under suitable conditions, both objects can be enhanced to the Verlinde algebra, which appears in mathematical physics as the Frobenius algebra of a certain topological quantum field theory, and in algebraic geometry as the algebra encoding information of moduli spaces of G-bundles over Riemann surfaces. The Verlinde algebra for G with nice connectedness properties have been well-known. However, explicit descriptions of such for disconnected G are lacking. In this talk, I will discuss the various aspects of the Freed-Hopkins-Teleman Theorem and partial results on an extension of the Verlinde algebra arising from a disconnected G. The talk is based on work in progress joint with David Baraglia and Varghese Mathai.
An Introduction to Ricci Flow
11:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Miles Simon :: University of Magdeburg

In these three talks we give an introduction to Ricci flow and present some applications thereof. After introducing the Ricci flow we present some theorems and arguments from the theory of linear and non-linear parabolic equations. We explain why this theory guarantees that there is always a solution to the Ricci flow for a short time for any given smooth initial metric on a compact manifold without boundary. We calculate evolution equations for certain geometric quantities, and present some examples of maximum principle type arguments. In the last lecture we present some geometric results which are derived with the help of the Ricci flow.

News matching "Index type invariants for twisted signature comple"

IGA Lecture Series by Professor Dan Freed
The School of Mathematical Sciences will host a series of lectures by Professor Dan Freed (University of Texas, Austin) as part of an upcoming IGA/AMSI workshop, October 18-22, 2010. Details of the workshop can be found here. Posted Tue 5 Oct 10.
ARC Grant Success
Congratulations to the following staff who were successful in securing funding from the Australian Research Council Discovery Projects Scheme. Associate Professor Finnur Larusson awarded $270,000 for his project Flexibility and symmetry in complex geometry; Dr Thomas Leistner, awarded $303,464 for his project Holonomy groups in Lorentzian geometry, Professor Michael Murray Murray and Dr Daniel Stevenson (Glasgow), awarded $270,000 for their project Bundle gerbes: generalisations and applications; Professor Mathai Varghese, awarded $105,000 for his project Advances in index theory and Prof Anthony Roberts and Professor Ioannis Kevrekidis (Princeton) awarded $330,000 for their project Accurate modelling of large multiscale dynamical systems for engineering and scientific simulation and analysis Posted Tue 8 Nov 11.
Summer Research Scholarship Applications now Open
Applications for AMSI Vacation Scholarships and Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships are now OPEN.

Refer here for a list of possible Summer Research topics. See the links below for further information:

AMSI Vacation Scholarships: Closing date Tuesday 17th September
http://www.amsi.org.au/index.php/higher-education/vacation-research-scholarships
University of Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships: Closing date Friday 11th October.
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/scholarships/undergrad/asrs.html

Posted Thu 15 Aug 13.
Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project is expected to enhance Australia’s position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

More information...

Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project will enhance Australia's position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

More information...

Publications matching "Index type invariants for twisted signature comple"

Publications
Equivariant and fractional index of projective elliptic operators
Varghese, Mathai; Melrose, R; Singer, I, Journal of Differential Geometry 78 (465–473) 2008
T-Duality in type II string theory via noncommutative geometry and beyond
Varghese, Mathai, Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement 171 (237–257) 2007
The twistor construction and Penrose transform in split signature
Eastwood, Michael, The Asian Journal of Mathematics 11 (103–111) 2007
Fractional analytic index
Varghese, Mathai; Melrose, R; Singer, I, Journal of Differential Geometry 74 (265–292) 2006
Heat kernels and the range of the trace on completions of twisted group algebras
Varghese, Mathai, Contemporary Mathematics 398 (321–345) 2006
Mathematical modelling of oxygen concentration in bovine and murine cumulus-oocyte complexes
Clark, Alys; Stokes, Yvonne; Lane, Michelle; Thompson, Jeremy, Reproduction 131 (999–1006) 2006
The index of projective families of elliptic operators
Varghese, Mathai; Melrose, R; Singer, I, Geometry & Topology Online 9 (341–373) 2005
Type II string theory and modularity
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 8 (038-1–038-30) 2005
Type IIB string theory, S-duality, and generalized cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Nuclear Physics B 715 (639–664) 2005
Class-of-service mapping for QoS: A statistical signature-based approach to IP traffic classification
Roughan, Matthew; Sen, S; Spatscheck, O; Duffield, N, ACM SIG COMM 2004, Taormina, Sicily, Italy 25/10/04
Gerbes, Clifford Modules and the index theorem
Murray, Michael; Singer, Michael, Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry 26 (355–367) 2004
M-theory, type IIA superstrings, and elliptic cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 8 (345–394) 2004
Some relations between twisted K-theory and E8 gauge theory
Varghese, Mathai; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 3 (WWW 1–WWW 22) 2004
Ito-type Formulas for Fractional Brownian Motion
Van Der Hoek, John, National Symposium on Financial Mathematics (3rd: 2004), Melbourne, Vic, Australia 10/06/04
Some relations between twisted K-theory and E-8 gauge theory
Mathai, V; Sati, Hicham, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) (WWW1–WWW22) 2004
Geometric means, index mappings and entropy
Comanescu, D; Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles, chapter in Inequality theory and applications - Volume 3 (Nova Science Publishers) 85–96, 2003
Geometric means, index mappings and supermultiplicativity
Pearce, Charles; Dragomir, S; Comanescu, D, chapter in Inequality theory and applications - Volume 2 (Nova Science Publishers) 193–201, 2003
Approximating L2 invariants and the Atiyah conjecture
Dodziuk, Josef; Linnell, P; Varghese, Mathai; Schick, T; Yates, Stuart, Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics 56 (839–873) 2003
Chern character in twisted K-theory: Equivariant and holomorphic cases
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 236 (161–186) 2003
Type-1 D-branes in an H-flux and twisted KO-theory
Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 11 (www 1–www 22) 2003
Approximating Spectral invariants of Harper operators on graphs II
Varghese, Mathai; Schick, T; Yates, S, Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society 131 (1917–1923) 2003
Decay rates of discrete phase-type distributions with infinitely-many phases
Bean, Nigel; Nielsen, B, Matrix-Analytic Methods Theory and Applications, Adelaide, Australia 14/07/02
Approximating spectral invariants of Harper operators on graphs
Varghese, Mathai; Yates, Stuart, Journal of Functional Analysis 188 (111–136) 2002
Families index theory for Overlap lattice Dirac operator. I
Adams, Damian, Nuclear Physics B 624 (469–484) 2002
Families index theory, gauge fixing, and topology of the space of lattice-gauge fields: a summary
Adams, Damian, Nuclear Physics B-Proceedings Supplements 109A (77–80) 2002
Means, g-convex dominated functions & Hadamard-type inequalities
Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Tamsui Oxford University Journal of Mathematical Sciences 18 (161–173) 2002
Seiberg-Witten and Casson-Walker invariants for rational homology 3-spheres
Marcolli, M; Wang, Bai-Ling, Geometriae Dedicata 91 (45–58) 2002
Twisted K-theory and K-theory of bundle gerbes
Bouwknegt, Pier; Carey, Alan; Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 228 (17–45) 2002
Two-point formulae of Euler type
Matic, M; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, The ANZIAM Journal 44 (221–245) 2002
Inequalities of Hlawka's type in G-inner product spaces
Cho, Y; Matic, M; Pecaric, Josip, Sixth International Conference on Nonlinear Functional Analysis, Gyeongsang & Kyungnam Nat Universities, Korea 01/09/00
Direct computation of the performance index for an optimally controlled active suspension with preview applied to a half-car model
Thompson, A; Pearce, Charles, Vehicle System Dynamics 35 (121–137) 2001
Performance index for a preview active suspension applied to a quarter-car model
Thompson, A; Pearce, Charles, Vehicle System Dynamics 35 (55–66) 2001
Plya-type inequalities for arbitrary functions
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip; Varosanec, S, Houston Journal of Mathematics 27 (601–612) 2001
Truncation-type methods and Bcklund transformations for ordinary differential equations: The third and fifth Painlev equations
Gordoa, P; Joshi, Nalini; Pickering, A, Glasgow Mathematical Journal 43A (23–32) 2001
Twisted index theory on good orbifolds, II: Fractional quantum numbers
Marcolli, M; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 217 (55–87) 2001
Modelling Service Time Distribution in Cellular Networks Using Phase-Type Service Distributions
Green, David; Asenstorfer, J; Jayasuriya, A,
Polya-type inequalities
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip; Varosanec, S, chapter in Handbook of analytic-computational methods in applied mathematics (Chapman & Hall/CRC) 465–505, 2000
A family of 2-dimensional laguerre planes of generalised shear type
Polster, Burkhard; Steinke, G, Bulletin of the Australian Mathematical Society 61 (69–83) 2000
A reverse Holder type inequality for the logarithmic mean and generalizations
Maloney, J; Heidel, J; Pecaric, Josip, The ANZIAM Journal 41 (401–409) 2000
D-Branes, B-Fields and twisted K-theory
Bouwknegt, Pier; Varghese, Mathai, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 3 (1–11) 2000
Dirac operator index and topology of lattice gauge fields
Adams, David, Chinese Journal of Physics 38 (633–646) 2000
Gauss-Plya type results and the Hlder Inequality
Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles; Sunde, J, Tamsui Oxford University Journal of Mathematical Sciences 16 (17–23) 2000
Generalizations of some inequalities of Ostrowski-gruss type
Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip; Ujevic, N; Varosanec, S, Mathematical Inequalities & Applications 3 (25–34) 2000
Level-phase independence for GI/M/1-type markov chains
Latouche, Guy; Taylor, Peter, Journal of Applied Probability 37 (984–998) 2000
Multivariate Hardy-type inequalities
Hanjs, Z; Pearce, Charles; Pecaric, Josip, Tamkang Journal of Mathematics 31 (149–158) 2000
Special functions of the isomonodromy type
Kitaev, Alexandre, Acta Applicandae Mathematicae 64 (1–32) 2000

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