The University of Adelaide
You are here
Text size: S | M | L
Printer Friendly Version
August 2018
MTWTFSS
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
       

Search the School of Mathematical Sciences

Find in People Courses Events News Publications

Events matching "How to count Betti numbers"

A Bivariate Zero-inflated Poisson Regression Model and application to some Dental Epidemiological data
14:10 Fri 27 Oct, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: University Prof Sudhir Paul

Data in the form of paired (pre-treatment, post-treatment) counts arise in the study of the effects of several treatments after accounting for possible covariate effects. An example of such a data set comes from a dental epidemiological study in Belo Horizonte (the Belo Horizonte caries prevention study) which evaluated various programmes for reducing caries. Also, these data may show extra pairs of zeros than can be accounted for by a simpler model, such as, a bivariate Poisson regression model. In such situations we propose to use a zero-inflated bivariate Poisson regression (ZIBPR) model for the paired (pre-treatment, posttreatment) count data. We develop EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the ZIBPR model. Further, we obtain exact Fisher information matrix of the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the ZIBPR model and develop a procedure for testing treatment effects. The procedure to detect treatment effects based on the ZIBPR model is compared, in terms of size, by simulations, with an earlier procedure using a zero-inflated Poisson regression (ZIPR) model of the post-treatment count with the pre-treatment count treated as a covariate. The procedure based on the ZIBPR model holds level most effectively. A further simulation study indicates good power property of the procedure based on the ZIBPR model. We then compare our analysis, of the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index data from the caries prevention study, based on the ZIBPR model with the analysis using a zero-inflated Poisson regression model in which the pre-treatment DMFT index is taken to be a covariate
Statistical convergence of sequences of complex numbers with application to Fourier series
15:10 Tue 27 Mar, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Ferenc Morics

Media...
The concept of statistical convergence was introduced by Henry Fast and Hugo Steinhaus in 1951. But in fact, it was Antoni Zygmund who first proved theorems on the statistical convergence of Fourier series, using the term \"almost convergence\". A sequence $\\{x_k : k=1,2\\ldots\\}$ of complex numbers is said to be statistically convergent to $\\xi$ if for every $\\varepsilon >0$ we have $$\\lim_{n\\to \\infty} n^{-1} |\\{1\\le k\\le n: |x_k-\\xi| > \\varepsilon\\}| = 0.$$ We present the basic properties of statistical convergence, and extend it to multiple sequences. We also discuss the convergence behavior of Fourier series.
Likelihood inference for a problem in particle physics
15:10 Fri 27 Jul, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Anthony Davison

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator located at CERN, near Geneva, is (currently!) expected to start operation in early 2008. It is located in an underground tunnel 27km in circumference, and when fully operational, will be the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator. It is hoped that it will provide evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson, the last remaining particle of the so-called Standard Model of particle physics. The quantity of data that will be generated by the LHC is roughly equivalent to that of the European telecommunications network, but this will be boiled down to just a few numbers. After a brief introduction, this talk will outline elements of the statistical problem of detecting the presence of a particle, and then sketch how higher order likelihood asymptotics may be used for signal detection in this context. The work is joint with Nicola Sartori, of the Università Ca' Foscari, in Venice.
Values of transcendental entire functions at algebraic points.
15:10 Fri 28 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Eugene Poletsky :: Syracuse University, USA

Algebraic numbers are roots of polynomials with integer coefficients, so their set is countable. All other numbers are called transcendental. Although most numbers are transcendental, it was only in 1873 that Hermite proved that the base $e$ of natural logarithms is not algebraic. The proof was based on the fact that $e$ is the value at 1 of the exponential function $e^z$ which is entire and does not change under differentiation.

This achievement raised two questions: What entire functions take only transcendental values at algebraic points? Also, given an entire transcendental function $f$, describe, or at least find properties of, the set of algebraic numbers where the values of $f$ are also algebraic. The first question, developed by Siegel, Shidlovsky, and others, led to the notion of $E$-functions, which have controlled derivatives. Answering the second question, Polya and Gelfond obtained restrictions for entire functions that have integer values at integer points (Polya) or Gaussian integer values at Gaussian integer points (Gelfond). For more general sets of points only counterexamples were known.

Recently D. Coman and the speaker developed new tools for the second question, which give an answer, at least partially, for general entire functions and their values at general sets of algebraic points.

In my talk we will discuss old and new results in this direction. All relevant definitions will be provided and the talk will be accessible to postgraduates and honours students.

Betti's Reciprocal Theorem for Inclusion and Contact Problems
15:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Enrico Betti (1823-1892) is recognized in the mathematics community for his pioneering contributions to topology. An equally important contribution is his formulation of the reciprocity theorem applicable to elastic bodies that satisfy the classical equations of linear elasticity. Although James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) proposed a law of reciprocal displacements and rotations in 1864, the contribution of Betti is acknowledged for its underlying formal mathematical basis and generality. The purpose of this lecture is to illustrate how Betti's reciprocal theorem can be used to full advantage to develop compact analytical results for certain contact and inclusion problems in the classical theory of elasticity. Inclusion problems are encountered in number of areas in applied mechanics ranging from composite materials to geomechanics. In composite materials, the inclusion represents an inhomogeneity that is introduced to increase either the strength or the deformability characteristics of resulting material. In geomechanics, the inclusion represents a constructed material region, such as a ground anchor, that is introduced to provide load transfer from structural systems. Similarly, contact problems have applications to the modelling of the behaviour of indentors used in materials testing to the study of foundations used to distribute loads transmitted from structures. In the study of conventional problems the inclusions and the contact regions are directly loaded and this makes their analysis quite straightforward. When the interaction is induced by loads that are placed exterior to the indentor or inclusion, the direct analysis of the problem becomes inordinately complicated both in terns of formulation of the integral equations and their numerical solution. It is shown by a set of selected examples that the application of Betti's reciprocal theorem leads to the development of exact closed form solutions to what would otherwise be approximate solutions achievable only through the numerical solution of a set of coupled integral equations.
Something cool about primes
13:10 Wed 13 Aug, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: Mr David Butler

So far this year in the undergraduate seminars, we have seen how mathematics is useful for solving important problems, and how mathematics can be used to uncover profound truths. In this seminar I will show you something about prime numbers that is neither useful nor profound. I just think it is extremely cool.
Free surface Stokes flows with surface tension
15:10 Fri 5 Sep, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Darren Crowdy :: Imperial College London

In this talk, we will survey a number of different free boundary problems involving slow viscous (Stokes) flows in which surface tension is active on the free boundary. Both steady and unsteady flows will be considered. Motivating applications range from industrial processes such as viscous sintering (where end-products are formed as a result of the surface-tension-driven densification of a compact of smaller particles that are heated in order that they coalesce) to biological phenomena such as understanding how organisms swim (i.e. propel themselves) at low Reynolds numbers. Common to our approach to all these problems will be an analytical/theoretical treatment of model problems via complex variable methods -- techniques well-known at infinite Reynolds numbers but used much less often in the Stokes regime. These model problems can give helpful insights into the behaviour of the true physical systems.
Critical sets of products of linear forms
13:10 Mon 14 Dec, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Graham Denham :: University of Western Ontario, Canada

Suppose $f_1,f_2,\ldots,f_n$ are linear polynomials in $\ell$ variables and $\lambda_1,\lambda_2,\ldots,\lambda_n$ are nonzero complex numbers. The product $$ \Phi_\lambda=\Prod_{i=1}^n f_1^{\lambda_i}, $$ called a master function, defines a (multivalued) function on $\ell$-dimensional complex space, or more precisely, on the complement of a set of hyperplanes. Then it is easy to ask (but harder to answer) what the set of critical points of a master function looks like, in terms of some properties of the input polynomials and $\lambda_i$'s. In my talk I will describe the motivation for considering such a question. Then I will indicate how the geometry and combinatorics of hyperplane arrangements can be used to provide at least a partial answer.
A solution to the Gromov-Vaserstein problem
15:10 Fri 29 Jan, 2010 :: Engineering North N 158 Chapman Lecture Theatre :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Berne, Switzerland

Any matrix in $SL_n (\mathbb C)$ can be written as a product of elementary matrices using the Gauss elimination process. If instead of the field of complex numbers, the entries in the matrix are elements of a more general ring, this becomes a delicate question. In particular, rings of complex-valued functions on a space are interesting cases. A deep result of Suslin gives an affirmative answer for the polynomial ring in $m$ variables in case the size $n$ of the matrix is at least 3. In the topological category, the problem was solved by Thurston and Vaserstein. For holomorphic functions on $\mathbb C^m$, the problem was posed by Gromov in the 1980s. We report on a complete solution to Gromov's problem. A main tool is the Oka-Grauert-Gromov h-principle in complex analysis. Our main theorem can be formulated as follows: In the absence of obvious topological obstructions, the Gauss elimination process can be performed in a way that depends holomorphically on the matrix. This is joint work with Bj\"orn Ivarsson.
Finite and infinite words in number theory
15:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Amy Glen :: Murdoch University

A 'word' is a finite or infinite sequence of symbols (called 'letters') taken from a finite non-empty set (called an 'alphabet'). In mathematics, words naturally arise when one wants to represent elements from some set (e.g., integers, real numbers, p-adic numbers, etc.) in a systematic way. For instance, expansions in integer bases (such as binary and decimal expansions) or continued fraction expansions allow us to associate with every real number a unique finite or infinite sequence of digits.

In this talk, I will discuss some old and new results in Combinatorics on Words and their applications to problems in Number Theory. In particular, by transforming inequalities between real numbers into (lexicographic) inequalities between infinite words representing their binary expansions, I will show how combinatorial properties of words can be used to completely describe the minimal intervals containing all fractional parts {x*2^n}, for some positive real number x, and for all non-negative integers n. This is joint work with Jean-Paul Allouche (Universite Paris-Sud, France).

Infinite numbers: what are they and what are they good for?
13:10 Wed 17 Mar, 2010 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

Media...
The sequence first, second, third,... can be continued with infinite ordinal numbers. I will explain what these infinite numbers are and how they can be used -- and sometimes must be used! -- to prove facts about ordinary, finite numbers.
Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
Counting lattice points in polytopes and geometry
15:10 Fri 6 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Dr Paul Norbury :: University of Melbourne

Counting lattice points in polytopes arises in many areas of pure and applied mathematics. A basic counting problem is this: how many different ways can one give change of 1 dollar into 5,10, 20 and 50 cent coins? This problem counts lattice points in a tetrahedron, and if there also must be exactly 10 coins then it counts lattice points in a triangle. The number of lattice points in polytopes can be used to measure the robustness of a computer network, or in statistics to test independence of characteristics of samples. I will describe the general structure of lattice point counts and the difficulty of calculations. I will then describe a particular lattice point count in which the structure simplifies considerably allowing one to calculate easily. I will spend a brief time at the end describing how this is related to the moduli space of Riemann surfaces.
A polyhedral model for boron nitride nanotubes
15:10 Fri 3 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Dr Barry Cox :: University of Adelaide

The conventional rolled-up model of nanotubes does not apply to the very small radii tubes, for which curvature effects become significant. In this talk an existing geometric model for carbon nanotubes proposed by the authors, which accommodates this deficiency and which is based on the exact polyhedral cylindrical structure, is extended to a nanotube structure involving two species of atoms in equal proportion, and in particular boron nitride nanotubes. This generalisation allows the principle features to be included as the fundamental assumptions of the model, such as equal bond length but distinct bond angles and radii between the two species. The polyhedral model is based on the five simple geometric assumptions: (i) all bonds are of equal length, (ii) all bond angles for the boron atoms are equal, (iii) all boron atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, (iv) all nitrogen atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, and (v) there exists a fixed ratio of pyramidal height H, between the boron species compared with the corresponding height in a symmetric single species nanotube. Working from these postulates, expressions are derived for the various structural parameters such as radii and bond angles for the two species for specific values of the chiral vector numbers (n,m). The new model incorporates an additional constant of proportionality H, which we assume applies to all nanotubes comprising the same elements and is such that H = 1 for a single species nanotube. Comparison with `ab initio' studies suggest that this assumption is entirely reasonable, and in particular we determine the value H = 0.56\pm0.04 for boron nitride, based on computational results in the literature. This talk relates to work which is a couple of years old and given time at the end we will discuss some newer results in geometric models developed with our former student Richard Lee (now also at the University of Adelaide as a post doc) and some work-in-progress on carbon nanocones. Note: pyramidal height is our own terminology and will be explained in the talk.
Principal Component Analysis Revisited
15:10 Fri 15 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Assoc. Prof Inge Koch :: University of Adelaide

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been an important tool in the analysis of multivariate data. The principal components summarise data in fewer than the original number of variables without losing essential information, and thus allow a split of the data into signal and noise components. PCA is a linear method, based on elegant mathematical theory. The increasing complexity of data together with the emergence of fast computers in the later parts of the 20th century has led to a renaissance of PCA. The growing numbers of variables (in particular, high-dimensional low sample size problems), non-Gaussian data, and functional data (where the data are curves) are posing exciting challenges to statisticians, and have resulted in new research which extends the classical theory. I begin with the classical PCA methodology and illustrate the challenges presented by the complex data that we are now able to collect. The main part of the talk focuses on extensions of PCA: the duality of PCA and the Principal Coordinates of Multidimensional Scaling, Sparse PCA, and consistency results relating to principal components, as the dimension grows. We will also look at newer developments such as Principal Component Regression and Supervised PCA, nonlinear PCA and Functional PCA.
What is a p-adic number?
12:10 Mon 28 Feb, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

The p-adic numbers are: (a) something that visiting seminar speakers invoke when the want to frighten the audience; (b) a fascinating and useful concept in modern algebra; (c) alphabetically just before q-adic numbers? In this talk I hope to convince the audience that option (b) is worth considering. I will begin by reviewing how we get from integers via rational numbers to the real number system. Then we'll look at how this process can be "twisted" to produce something new.
Algebraic hypersurfaces arising from Gorenstein algebras
15:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

Media...
To every Gorenstein algebra of finite dimension greater than 1 over a field of characteristic zero, and a projection on its maximal ideal with range equal to the annihilator of the ideal, one can associate a certain algebraic hypersurface lying in the ideal. Such hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties. They can be used, for instance, to help decide whether two given Gorenstein algebras are isomorphic, which for the case of complex numbers leads to interesting consequences in singularity theory. Also, for the case of real numbers such hypersurfaces naturally arise in CR-geometry. In my talk I will discuss these hypersurfaces and some of their applications.
The (dual) local cyclic homology valued Chern-Connes character for some infinite dimensional spaces
13:10 Fri 29 Jul, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: School of Mathematical Sciences

I will explain how to construct a bivariant Chern-Connes character on the category of sigma-C*-algebras taking values in Puschnigg's local cyclic homology. Roughly, setting the first (resp. the second) variable to complex numbers one obtains the K-theoretic (resp. dual K-homological) Chern-Connes character in one variable. We shall focus on the dual K-homological Chern-Connes character and investigate it in the example of SU(infty).
The real thing
12:10 Wed 3 Aug, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Paul McCann :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Let x be a real number. This familiar and seemingly innocent assumption opens up a world of infinite variety and information. We use some simple techniques (powers of two, geometric series) to examine some interesting consequences of generating random real numbers, and encounter both the best flash drive and the worst flash drive you will ever meet. Come "hold infinity in the palm of your hand", and contemplate eternity for about half an hour. Almost nothing is assumed, almost everything is explained, and absolutely all are welcome.
Spectra alignment/matching for the classification of cancer and control patients
12:10 Mon 8 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Tyman Stanford :: University of Adelaide

Proteomic time-of-flight mass spectrometry produces a spectrum based on the peptides (chains of amino acids) in each patient’s serum sample. The spectra contain data points for an x-axis (peptide weight) and a y-axis (peptide frequency/count/intensity). It is our end goal to differentiate cancer (and sub-types) and control patients using these spectra. Before we can do this, peaks in these data must be found and common peptides to different spectra must be found. The data are noisy because of biotechnological variation and calibration error; data points for different peptide weights may in fact be same peptide. An algorithm needs to be employed to find common peptides between spectra, as performing alignment ‘by hand’ is almost infeasible. We borrow methods suggested in the literature by metabolomic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and extend the methods for our purposes. In this talk I will go over the basic tenets of what we hope to achieve and the process towards this.
Horocycle flows at prime times
13:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

The distribution of individual orbits of unipotent flows in homogeneous spaces are well understood thanks to the work work of Marina Ratner. It is conjectured that this property is preserved on restricting the times from the integers to primes, this being important in the study of prime numbers as well as in such dynamics. We review progress in understanding this conjecture, starting with Dirichlet (a finite system), Vinogradov (rotation of a circle or torus), Green and Tao (translation on a nilmanifold) and Ubis and Sarnak (horocycle flows in the semisimple case).
Estimating transmission parameters for the swine flu pandemic
15:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Kathryn Glass :: Australian National University

Media...
Following the onset of a new strain of influenza with pandemic potential, policy makers need specific advice on how fast the disease is spreading, who is at risk, and what interventions are appropriate for slowing transmission. Mathematical models play a key role in comparing interventions and identifying the best response, but models are only as good as the data that inform them. In the early stages of the 2009 swine flu outbreak, many researchers estimated transmission parameters - particularly the reproduction number - from outbreak data. These estimates varied, and were often biased by data collection methods, misclassification of imported cases or as a result of early stochasticity in case numbers. I will discuss a number of the pitfalls in achieving good quality parameter estimates from early outbreak data, and outline how best to avoid them. One of the early indications from swine flu data was that children were disproportionately responsible for disease spread. I will introduce a new method for estimating age-specific transmission parameters from both outbreak and seroprevalence data. This approach allows us to take account of empirical data on human contact patterns, and highlights the need to allow for asymmetric mixing matrices in modelling disease transmission between age groups. Applied to swine flu data from a number of different countries, it presents a consistent picture of higher transmission from children.
The entropy of an overlapping dynamical system
15:10 Fri 23 Mar, 2012 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Michael Barnsley :: Australian National University

Media...
The term "overlapping" refers to a certain fairly simple type of piecewise continuous function from the unit interval to itself and also to a fairly simple type of iterated function system (IFS) on the unit interval. A correspondence between these two classes of objects is used to: 1. find a necessary and sufficient condition for a fractal transformation from the attractor of one overlapping IFS to the attractor of another overlapping IFS to be a homeomorphism and 2. find a formula for the topological entropy of the dynamical system associated with an overlapping function. These results suggest a new method for analysing clocks, weather systems and prime numbers.
Geometric modular representation theory
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Anthony Henderson :: University of Sydney

Representation theory is one of the oldest areas of algebra, but many basic questions in it are still unanswered. This is especially true in the modular case, where one considers vector spaces over a field F of positive characteristic; typically, complications arise for particular small values of the characteristic. For example, from a vector space V one can construct the symmetric square S^2(V), which is one easy example of a representation of the group GL(V). One would like to say that this representation is irreducible, but that statement is not always true: if F has characteristic 2, there is a nontrivial invariant subspace. Even for GL(V), we do not know the dimensions of all irreducible representations in all characteristics. In this talk, I will introduce some of the main ideas of geometric modular representation theory, a more recent approach which is making progress on some of these old problems. Essentially, the strategy is to re-formulate everything in terms of homology of various topological spaces, where F appears only as the field of coefficients and the spaces themselves are independent of F; thus, the modular anomalies in representation theory arise because homology with modular coefficients is detecting something about the topology that rational coefficients do not. In practice, the spaces are usually varieties over the complex numbers, and homology is replaced by intersection cohomology to take into account the singularities of these varieties.
AFL Tipping isn't all about numbers and stats...or is it.....
12:10 Mon 6 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Jessica Tan :: University of Adelaide

Media...
The result of an AFL game is always unpredictable - we all know that. Hence why we discuss the weekend's upsets and the local tipping competition as part of the "water-cooler and weekend" conversation on a Monday morning. Different people use various weird and wonderful techniques or criteria to predict the winning team. With readily available data, I will investigate and compare various strategies and define a measure of the hardness of a round (full acknowledgements will be made in my presentation). Hopefully this will help me for next year's tipping competition...
Hodge numbers and cohomology of complex algebraic varieties
13:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: University of Sydney

Let $X$ be a complex algebraic variety defined over the ring $\mathfrak{O}$ of integers in a number field $K$ and let $\Gamma$ be a group of $\mathfrak{O}$-automorphisms of $X$. I shall discuss how the counting of rational points over reductions mod $p$ of $X$, and an analysis of the Hodge structure of the cohomology of $X$, may be used to determine the cohomology as a $\Gamma$-module. This will include some joint work with Alex Dimca and with Mark Kisin, and some classical unsolved problems.
Dynamics and the geometry of numbers
14:10 Fri 27 Sep, 2013 :: Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre :: Prof Akshay Venkatesh :: Stanford University

Media...
It was understood by Minkowski that one could prove interesting results in number theory by considering the geometry of lattices in R^n. (A lattice is simply a grid of points.) This technique is called the "geometry of numbers." We now understand much more about analysis and dynamics on the space of all lattices, and this has led to a deeper understanding of classical questions. I will review some of these ideas, with emphasis on the dynamical aspects.
Complexifications, Realifications, Real forms and Complex Structures
12:10 Mon 23 Jun, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kelli Francis-Staite :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Italian mathematicians Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia and Gerolamo Cardano introduced complex numbers to solve polynomial equations such as x^2+1=0. Solving a standard real differential equation often uses complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. In both cases, the solution space is expanded to include the complex numbers, solved, and then translated back to the real case. My talk aims to explain the process of complexification and related concepts. It will give vocabulary and some basic results about this important process. And it will contain cute cat pictures.
Mathematics: a castle in the sky?
14:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr. David Roberts :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
At university you are exposed to more rigorous mathematics than at school, exemplified by definitions such as those of real numbers individually or as a whole. However, what does mathematics ultimately rest on? Definitions depend on things defined earlier, and this process must stop at some point. Mathematicians expended a lot of energy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries trying to pin down the absolutely fundamental ideas of mathematics, with unexpected results. The results of these efforts are called foundations and are still an area of active research today. This talk will explain what foundations are, some of the historical setting in which they arose, and several of the various systems on which mathematics can be built -- and why most of the mathematics you will do only uses a tiny portion of it!
Modelling Directionality in Stationary Geophysical Time Series
12:10 Mon 12 Oct, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Mohd Mahayaudin Mansor :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Many time series show directionality inasmuch as plots again-st time and against time-to-go are qualitatively different, and there is a range of statistical tests to quantify this effect. There are two strategies for allowing for directionality in time series models. Linear models are reversible if and only if the noise terms are Gaussian, so one strategy is to use linear models with non-Gaussian noise. The alternative is to use non-linear models. We investigate how non-Gaussian noise affects directionality in a first order autoregressive process AR(1) and compare this with a threshold autoregressive model with two thresholds. The findings are used to suggest possible improvements to an AR(9) model, identified by an AIC criterion, for the average yearly sunspot numbers from 1700 to 1900. The improvement is defined in terms of one-step-ahead forecast errors from 1901 to 2014.
How to count Betti numbers
12:10 Fri 6 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

Media...
I will begin this talk by showing how to obtain the Betti numbers of certain smooth complex projective varieties by counting points over a finite field. For singular or non-compact varieties this motivates us to consider the "virtual Hodge numbers" encoded by the "Hodge-Deligne polynomial", a refinement of the topological Euler characteristic. I will then discuss the computation of Hodge-Deligne polynomials for certain singular character varieties (i.e. moduli spaces of flat connections).
What is the best way to count votes?
13:10 Mon 12 Sep, 2016 :: Hughes 322 :: Dr Stuart Johnson :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Around the world there are many different ways of counting votes in elections, and even within Australia there are different methods in use in various states. Which is the best method? Even for the simplest case of electing one person in a single electorate there is no easy answer to this, in fact there is a famous result - Arrow's Theorem - which tells us that there is no perfect way of counting votes. I will describe a number of different methods along with their problems before giving a more precise statement of the theorem and outlining a proof
The mystery of colony collapse: Mathematics and honey bee loss
15:10 Fri 16 Sep, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Mary Myerscough :: University of Sydney

Media...
Honey bees are vital to the production of many foods which need to be pollinated by insects. Yet in many parts of the world honey bee colonies are in decline. A crucial contributor to hive well-being is the health, productivity and longevity of its foragers. When forager numbers are depleted due to stressors in the colony (such as disease or malnutrition) or in the environment (such as pesticides) there is a significant effect, not only on the amount of food (nectar and pollen) that can be collected but also on the colony's capacity to raise brood (eggs, larvae and pupae) to produce new adult bees to replace lost or aged bees. We use a set of differential equation models to explore the effect on the hive of high forager death rates. In particular we examine what happens when bees become foragers at a comparatively young age and how this can lead to a sudden rapid decline of adult bees and the death of the colony.
Segregation of particles in incompressible flows due to streamline topology and particle-boundary interaction
15:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Professor Hendrik C. Kuhlmann :: Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria

Media...
The incompressible flow in a number of classical benchmark problems (e.g. lid-driven cavity, liquid bridge) undergoes an instability from a two-dimensional steady to a periodic three-dimensional flow, which is steady or in form of a traveling wave, if the Reynolds number is increased. In the supercritical regime chaotic as well as regular (quasi-periodic) streamlines can coexist for a range of Reynolds numbers. The spatial structures of the regular regions in three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows has received relatively little attention, partly because of the high numerical effort required for resolving these structures. Particles whose density does not differ much from that of the liquid approximately follow the chaotic or regular streamlines in the bulk. Near the boundaries, however, their trajectories strongly deviate from the streamlines, in particular if the boundary (wall or free surface) is moving tangentially. As a result of this particle-boundary interaction particles can rapidly segregate and be attracted to periodic or quasi-periodic orbits, yielding particle accumulation structures (PAS). The mechanism of PAS will be explained and results from experiments and numerical modelling will be presented to demonstrate the generic character of the phenomenon.
What is index theory?
12:10 Tue 21 Mar, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Index theory is a link between topology, geometry and analysis. A typical theorem in index theory says that two numbers are equal: an analytic index and a topological index. The first theorem of this kind was the index theorem of Atiyah and Singer, which they proved in 1963. Index theorems have many applications in maths and physics. For example, they can be used to prove that a differential equation must have a solution. Also, they imply that the topology of a space like a sphere or a torus determines in what ways it can be curved. Topology is the study of geometric properties that do not change if we stretch or compress a shape without cutting or glueing. Curvature does change when we stretch something out, so it is surprising that topology can say anything about curvature. Index theory has many surprising consequences like this.
Exact coherent structures in high speed flows
15:10 Fri 28 Jul, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Philip Hall :: Monash University

In recent years, there has been much interest in the relevance of nonlinear solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to fully turbulent flows. The solutions must be calculated numerically at moderate Reynolds numbers but in the limit of high Reynolds numbers asymptotic methods can be used to greatly simplify the computational task and to uncover the key physical processes sustaining the nonlinear states. In particular, in confined flows exact coherent structures defining the boundary between the laminar and turbulent attractors can be constructed. In addition, structures which capture the essential physical properties of fully turbulent flows can be found. The extension of the ideas to boundary layer flows and current work attempting to explain the law of the wall will be discussed.
Conway's Rational Tangle
12:10 Tue 15 Aug, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Hang Wang :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Many researches in mathematics essentially feature some classification problems. In this context, invariants are created in order to associate algebraic quantities, such as numbers and groups, to elements of interested classes of geometric objects, such as surfaces. A key property of an invariant is that it does not change under ``allowable moves'' which can be specified in various geometric contexts. We demonstrate these lines of ideas by rational tangles, a notion in knot theory. A tangle is analogous to a link except that it has free ends. Conway's rational tangles are the simplest tangles that can be ``unwound'' under a finite sequence of two simple moves, and they arise as building blocks for knots. A numerical invariant will be introduced for Conway's rational tangles and it provides the only known example of a complete invariant in knot theory.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 18 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

Media...
A pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous space $M$ of finite volume can be presented as $M=G/H$, where $G$ is a Lie group acting transitively and isometrically on $M$, and $H$ is a closed subgroup of $G$. The condition that $G$ acts isometrically and thus preserves a finite measure on $M$ leads to strong algebraic restrictions on $G$. In the special case where $G$ has no compact semisimple normal subgroups, it turns out that the isotropy subgroup $H$ is a lattice, and that the metric on $M$ comes from a bi-invariant metric on $G$. This result allows us to recover Zeghib’s classification of Lorentzian compact homogeneous spaces, and to move towards a classification for metric index 2. As an application we can investigate which pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces of finite volume are Einstein spaces. Through the existence questions for lattice subgroups, this leads to an interesting connection with the theory of transcendental numbers, which allows us to characterize the Einstein cases in low dimensions. This talk is based on joint works with Oliver Baues, Yuri Nikolayevsky and Abdelghani Zeghib.

Publications matching "How to count Betti numbers"

Publications
Impinging laminar jets at moderate Reynolds numbers and separation distances
Bergthorson, J; Sone, K; Mattner, Trent; Dimotakis, P; Goodwin, D; Meiron, D, Physical Review E. (Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics) 72 (066307-1–066307-12) 2005
Twisted index theory on good orbifolds, II: Fractional quantum numbers
Marcolli, M; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 217 (55–87) 2001
Drawing with complex numbers
Eastwood, Michael; Penrose, R, Mathematical Intelligencer 22 (8–13) 2000

Advanced search options

You may be able to improve your search results by using the following syntax:

QueryMatches the following
Asymptotic EquationAnything with "Asymptotic" or "Equation".
+Asymptotic +EquationAnything with "Asymptotic" and "Equation".
+Stokes -"Navier-Stokes"Anything containing "Stokes" but not "Navier-Stokes".
Dynam*Anything containing "Dynamic", "Dynamical", "Dynamicist" etc.