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Events matching "Group meeting"

Mathematics of underground mining.
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Hyam Rubinstein

Underground mining infrastructure involves an interesting range of optimisation problems with geometric constraints. In particular, ramps, drives and tunnels have gradient within a certain prescribed range and turning circles (curvature) are also bounded. Finally obstacles have to be avoided, such as faults, ore bodies themselves and old workings. A group of mathematicians and engineers at Uni of Melb and Uni of SA have been working on this problem for a number of years. I will summarise what we have found and the challenges of working in the mining industry.
An Introduction to invariant differential pairings
14:10 Tue 24 Jul, 2007 :: Mathematics G08 :: Jens Kroeske

On homogeneous spaces G/P, where G is a semi-simple Lie group and P is a parabolic subgroup (the ordinary sphere or projective spaces being examples), invariant operators, that is operators between certain homogeneous bundles (functions, vector fields or forms being amongst the typical examples) that are invariant under the action of the group G, have been studied extensively. Especially on so called hermitian symmetric spaces which arise through a 1-grading of the Lie algebra of G there exists a complete classification of first order invariant linear differential operators even on more general manifolds (that allow a so called almost hermitian structure).

This talk will introduce the notion of an invariant bilinear differential pairing between sections of the aforementioned homogeneous bundles. Moreover we will discuss a classification (excluding certain totally degenerate cases) of all first order invariant bilinear differential pairings on manifolds with an almost hermitian symmetric structure. The similarities and connections with the linear operator classification will be highlighted and discussed.

String structures and characteristic classes for loop group bundles
13:10 Fri 1 May, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Mr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Chern-Weil homomorphism gives a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundles. In infinite dimensions, however, the standard theory fails due to analytical problems. In this talk I shall give a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundle with structure group the loop group of a compact group which side-steps these complications. This theory is inspired in some sense by results on the string class (a certain cohomology class on the base of a loop group bundle) which I shall outline.
Another proof of Gaboriau-Popa
13:10 Fri 3 Jul, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Greg Hjorth :: University of Melbourne

Gaboriau and Popa showed that a non-abelian free group on finitely many generators has continuum many measure preserving, free, ergodic, actions on standard Borel probability spaces. The original proof used the notion of property (T). I will sketch how this can be replaced by an elementary, and apparently new, dynamical property.
Weak Hopf algebras and Frobenius algebras
13:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University

A basic example of a Hopf algebra is a group algebra: it is the vector space having the group as basis and having multiplication linearly extending that of the group. We can start with a category instead of a group, form the free vector space on the set of its morphisms, and define multiplication to be composition when possible and zero when not. The multiplication has an identity if the category has finitely many objects; this is a basic example of a weak bialgebra. It is a weak Hopf algebra when the category is a groupoid. Group algebras are also Frobenius algebras. We shall generalize weak bialgebras and Frobenius algebras to the context of monoidal categories and describe some of their theory using the geometry of string diagrams.
From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
The Monster
12:10 Thu 10 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Dr David Parrott :: University of Adelaide

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The simple groups are the building blocks of all finite groups. The classification of finite simple groups is a towering achievement of 20th century mathematics. In addition to 18 infinite families of finite simple groups, there are 26 sporadic groups. The biggest sporadic group, dubbed The Monster, has about 10^54 elements. The talk will give a glimpse of this deep area of mathematics.
Covering spaces and algebra bundles
13:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Keith Hannabuss :: University of Oxford

Bundles of C*-algebras over a topological space M can be classified by a Dixmier-Douady obstruction in H^3(M,Z). This talk will describe some recent work with Mathai investigating the relationship between algebra bundles on M and on its covering space, where there can be no obstruction, particularly when there is a group acting on M.
Stable commutator length
13:40 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Danny Calegari :: California Institute of Technology

Stable commutator length answers the question: "what is the simplest surface in a given space with prescribed boundary?" where "simplest" is interpreted in topological terms. This topological definition is complemented by several equivalent definitions - in group theory, as a measure of non-commutativity of a group; and in linear programming, as the solution of a certain linear optimization problem. On the topological side, scl is concerned with questions such as computing the genus of a knot, or finding the simplest 4-manifold that bounds a given 3-manifold. On the linear programming side, scl is measured in terms of certain functions called quasimorphisms, which arise from hyperbolic geometry (negative curvature) and symplectic geometry (causal structures). In these talks we will discuss how scl in free and surface groups is connected to such diverse phenomena as the existence of closed surface subgroups in graphs of groups, rigidity and discreteness of symplectic representations, bounding immersed curves on a surface by immersed subsurfaces, and the theory of multi- dimensional continued fractions and Klein polyhedra. Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory. He received a B.A. in 1994 from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley under the joint supervision of Andrew Casson and William Thurston. From 2000 to 2002 he was Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University, after which he joined the Caltech faculty; he became Richard Merkin Professor in 2007.
Irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n)
13:10 Fri 16 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

Berger's classification of irreducibly represented Lie groups that can occur as holonomy groups of semi-Riemannian manifolds is a remarkable result of modern differential geometry. What is remarkable about it is that it is so short and that only so few types of geometry can occur. In Riemannian signature this is even more remarkable, taking into account that any representation of a compact Lie group admits a positive definite invariant scalar product. Hence, for any not too small n there is an abundance of irreducible subgroups of SO(n). We show that in other signatures the situation is quite different with, for example, SO(1,n) having no proper irreducible subgroups. We will show how this and the corresponding result about irreducible subgroups of SO(2,n) follows from the Karpelevich-Mostov theorem. (This is joint work with Antonio J. Di Scala, Politecnico di Torino.)
Group actions in complex geometry, I and II
13:10 Fri 8 Jan, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch, IGA Lecturer :: University of Berne

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Group actions in complex geometry, III and IV
10:10 Fri 15 Jan, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch, IGA Lecturer :: University of Berne

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Group actions in complex geometry, V and VI
10:10 Fri 22 Jan, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch, IGA Lecturer :: University of Berne

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Group actions in complex geometry, VII and VIII
10:10 Fri 29 Jan, 2010 :: Napier LG 23 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch, IGA Lecturer :: University of Berne

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The exceptional Lie group G_2 and rolling balls
15:10 Fri 19 Feb, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Pawel Nurowski :: University of Warsaw

In this talk, after a brief history of how the exceptional Lie group G_2 was discovered, I present various appearances of this group in mathematics. Its physical realisation as a symmetry group of a simple mechanical system will also be discussed.
Conformal structures with G_2 ambient metrics
13:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

The n-sphere considered as a conformal manifold can be viewed as the projectivisation of the light cone in n+2 Minkowski space. A construction that generalises this picture to arbitrary conformal classes is the ambient metric introduced by C. Fefferman and R. Graham. In the talk, I will explain the Fefferman-Graham ambient metric construction and how it detects the existence of certain metrics in the conformal class. Then I will present conformal classes of signature (3,2) for which the 7-dimensional ambient metric has the noncompact exceptional Lie group G_2 as its holonomy. This is joint work with P. Nurowski, Warsaw University.
Loop groups and characteristic classes
13:10 Fri 23 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

Suppose $G$ is a compact Lie group, $LG$ its (free) loop group and $\Omega G \subseteq LG$ its based loop group. Let $P \to M$ be a principal bundle with structure group one of these loop groups. In general, differential form representatives of characteristic classes for principal bundles can be easily obtained using the Chern-Weil homomorphism, however for infinite-dimensional bundles such as $P$ this runs into analytical problems and classes are more difficult to construct. In this talk I will explain some new results on characteristic classes for loop group bundles which demonstrate how to construct certain classes---which we call string classes---for such bundles. These are obtained by making heavy use of a certain $G$-bundle associated to any loop group bundle (which allows us to avoid the problems of dealing with infinite-dimensional bundles). We shall see that the free loop group case naturally involves equivariant cohomology.
Moduli spaces of stable holomorphic vector bundles II
13:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: A/Prof Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

In this talk, I shall briefly review the notion of stability for holomorphic vector bundles on compact complex manifolds as discussed in the first part of this talk (28 August 2009). Then I shall attempt to compute some explicit examples in simple situations, illustrating the use of basic algebraic-geometric tools. The level of the talk will be appropriate for graduate students, particularly those who have been taking part in the algebraic geometry reading group meetings.
The caloron transform
13:10 Fri 7 May, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Michael Murray :: University of Adelaide

The caloron transform is a `fake' dimensional reduction which transforms a G-bundle over certain manifolds to a loop group of G bundle over a manifold of one lower dimension. This talk will review the caloron transform and show how it can be best understood using the language of pseudo-isomorphisms from category theory as well as considering its application to Bogomolny monopoles and string structures.
Holonomy groups
15:10 Fri 7 May, 2010 :: Napier LG24 :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

In the first part of the talk I will illustrate some basic concepts of differential geometry that lead to the notion of a holonomy group. Then I will explain Berger's classification of Riemannian holonomy groups and discuss questions that arose from it. Finally, I will focus on holonomy groups of Lorentzian manifolds and indicate briefly why all this is of relevance to present-day theoretical physics.
Moduli spaces of stable holomorphic vector bundles III
13:10 Fri 14 May, 2010 :: School Board Room :: A/Prof Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

This talk is a continuation of the talk on 30 April. The same abstract applies: In this talk, I shall briefly review the notion of stability for holomorphic vector bundles on compact complex manifolds as discussed in the first part of this talk (28 August 2009). Then I shall attempt to compute some explicit examples in simple situations, illustrating the use of basic algebraic-geometric tools. The level of the talk will be appropriate for graduate students, particularly those who have been taking part in the algebraic geometry reading group meetings.
On affine BMW algebras
13:10 Fri 25 Jun, 2010 :: Napier 208 :: Prof Arun Ram :: University of Melbourne

I will describe a family of algebras of tangles (which give rise to link invariants following the methods of Reshetikhin-Turaev and Jones) and describe some aspects of their structure and their representation theory. The main goal will be to explain how to use universal Verma modules for the symplectic group to compute the representation theory of affine BMW (Birman-Murakami-Wenzl) algebras.
The Hmm... Sessions
11:00 Wed 14 Jul, 2010 :: Maths Drop-In Centre (Level 1 Schulz Building)

The aim of the Hmm... Sessions is for people to get together to solve puzzles as a group. There will be lots of time to solve puzzles in groups and to celebrate the clever solutions of others. The lunchbreak provides time to socialise, play games or to continue solving puzzles (bring your own lunch, or go out to nearby Rundle Mall to buy lunch on the day).

Hosted by Dr David Butler of the Maths Learning Service, University of Adelaide.

Contraction subgroups in locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

For each automorphism, $\alpha$, of the locally compact group $G$ there is a corresponding {\sl contraction subgroup\/}, $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$, which is the set of $x\in G$ such that $\alpha^n(x)$ converges to the identity as $n\to \infty$. Contractions subgroups are important in representation theory, through the Mautner phenomenon, and in the study of convolution semigroups. If $G$ is a Lie group, then $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ is automatically closed, can be described in terms of eigenvalues of $\hbox{ad}(\alpha)$, and is nilpotent. Since any connected group may be approximated by Lie groups, contraction subgroups of connected groups are thus well understood. Following a general introduction, the talk will focus on contraction subgroups of totally disconnected groups. A criterion for non-triviality of $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ will be described (joint work with U.~Baumgartner) and a structure theorem for $\hbox{con}(\alpha)$ when it is closed will be presented (joint with H.~Gl\"oeckner).
Totally disconnected, locally compact groups
15:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

Locally compact groups occur in many branches of mathematics. Their study falls into two cases: connected groups, which occur as automorphisms of smooth structures such as spheres for example; and totally disconnected groups, which occur as automorphisms of discrete structures such as trees. The talk will give an overview of the currently developing structure theory of totally disconnected locally compact groups. Techniques for analysing totally disconnected groups will be described that correspond to the familiar Lie group methods used to treat connected groups. These techniques played an essential role in the recent solution of a problem raised by R. Zimmer and G. Margulis concerning commensurated subgroups of arithmetic groups.
Surface quotients of hyperbolic buildings
13:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

Let I(p,v) be Bourdon's building, the unique simply-connected 2-complex such that all 2-cells are regular right-angled hyperbolic p-gons, and the link at each vertex is the complete bipartite graph K_{v,v}. We investigate and mostly determine the set of triples (p,v,g) for which there is a discrete group acting on I(p,v) so that the quotient is a compact orientable surface of genus g. Surprisingly, the existence of such a quotient depends upon the value of v. The remaining cases lead to open questions in tessellations of surfaces and in number theory. We use elementary group theory, combinatorics, algebraic topology and number theory. This is joint work with David Futer.
Lattices in exotic groups
15:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

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A lattice in a locally compact group G is a discrete subgroup of cofinite volume. Lattices in Lie groups are well-studied, but little is known about lattices in other, "exotic", locally compact groups. Examples of exotic groups include isometry groups of trees, buildings, polyhedral complexes and CAT(0) spaces, and Kac-Moody groups. We will survey known results, which include both rigidity and surprising examples of flexibility, and discuss the wide range of tools used to investigate lattices in these non-classical settings.
Operator algebra quantum groups
13:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: University of Adelaide

Woronowicz initiated the study of quantum groups using C*-algebras. His framework enabled him to deal with compact (linear) quantum groups. In this talk we shall introduce a notion of quantum groups that can handle infinite dimensional examples like SU(\infty). We shall also study some quantum homogeneous spaces associated to this group and compute their K-theory groups. This is joint work with V. Mathai.
Centres of cyclotomic Hecke algebras
13:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: A/Prof Andrew Francis :: University of Western Sydney

The cyclotomic Hecke algebras, or Ariki-Koike algebras $H(R,q)$, are deformations of the group algebras of certain complex reflection groups $G(r,1,n)$, and also are quotients of the ubiquitous affine Hecke algebra. The centre of the affine Hecke algebra has been understood since Bernstein in terms of the symmetric group action on the weight lattice. In this talk I will discuss the proof that over an arbitrary unital commutative ring $R$, the centre of the affine Hecke algebra maps \emph{onto} the centre of the cyclotomic Hecke algebra when $q-1$ is invertible in $R$. This is the analogue of the fact that the centre of the Hecke algebra of type $A$ is the set of symmetric polynomials in Jucys-Murphy elements (formerly known as he Dipper-James conjecture). Key components of the proof include the relationship between the trace functions on the affine Hecke algebra and on the cyclotomic Hecke algebra, and the link to the affine braid group. This is joint work with John Graham and Lenny Jones.
Lifting principal bundles and abelian extensions
13:10 Fri 27 May, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Prof Michael Murray :: School of Mathematical Sciences

I will review what it means to lift the structure group of a principal bundle and the topological obstruction to this in the case of a central extension. I will then discuss some new results in the case of abelian extensions.
From group action to Kontsevich's Swiss-Cheese conjecture through categorification
15:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

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The Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture is a deep generalization of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains which plays an important role in the deformation quantization theory. Categorification is a method of thinking about mathematics by replacing set theoretical concepts by some higher dimensional objects. Categorification is somewhat of an art because there is no exact recipe for doing this. It is, however, a very powerful method of understanding (and producing) many deep results starting from simple facts we learned as undergraduate students. In my talk I will explain how Kontsevich Swiss-Cheese conjecture can be easily understood as a special case of categorification of a very familiar statement: an action of a group G (more generally, a monoid) on a set X is the same as group homomorphism from G to the group of automorphisms of X (monoid of endomorphisms of X in the case of a monoid action).
There are no magnetically charged particle-like solutions of the Einstein-Yang-Mills equations for models with Abelian residual groups
13:10 Fri 19 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Todd Oliynyk :: Monash University

According to a conjecture from the 90's, globally regular, static, spherically symmetric (i.e. particle-like) solutions with nonzero total magnetic charge are not expected to exist in Einstein-Yang-Mills theory. In this talk, I will describe recent work done in collaboration with M. Fisher where we establish the validity of this conjecture under certain restrictions on the residual gauge group. Of particular interest is that our non-existence results apply to the most widely studied models with Abelian residual groups.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
10:00 Mon 5 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli

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Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage.
Twisted Morava K-theory
13:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

Morava's extraordinary K-theories K(n) are a family of generalized cohomology theories which behave in some ways like K-theory (indeed, K(1) is mod 2 K-theory). Their construction exploits Quillen's description of cobordism in terms of formal group laws and Lubin-Tate's methods in class field theory for constructing abelian extensions of number fields. Constructed from homotopy-theoretic methods, they do not admit a geometric description (like deRham cohomology, K-theory, or cobordism), but are nonetheless subtle, computable invariants of topological spaces. In this talk, I will give an introduction to these theories, and explain how it is possible to define an analogue of twisted K-theory in this setting. Traditionally, K-theory is twisted by a three-dimensional cohomology class; in this case, K(n) admits twists by (n+2)-dimensional classes. This work is joint with Hisham Sati.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
Space of 2D shapes and the Weil-Petersson metric: shapes, ideal fluid and Alzheimer's disease
13:10 Fri 25 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sergey Kushnarev :: National University of Singapore

The Weil-Petersson metric is an exciting metric on a space of simple plane curves. In this talk the speaker will introduce the shape space and demonstrate the connection with the Euler-Poincare equations on the group of diffeomorphisms (EPDiff). A numerical method for finding geodesics between two shapes will be demonstrated and applied to the surface of the hippocampus to study the effects of Alzheimer's disease. As another application the speaker will discuss how to do statistics on the shape space and what should be done to improve it.
The Lorentzian conformal analogue of Calabi-Yau manifolds
13:10 Fri 16 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Helga Baum :: Humboldt University

Calabi-Yau manifolds are Riemannian manifolds with holonomy group SU(m). They are Ricci-flat and Kahler and admit a 2-parameter family of parallel spinors. In the talk we will discuss the Lorentzian conformal analogue of this situation. If on a manifold a class of conformally equivalent metrics [g] is given, then one can consider the holonomy group of the conformal manifold (M,[g]), which is a subgroup of O(p+1,q+1) if the metric g has signature (p,q). There is a close relation between algebraic properties of the conformal holonomy group and the existence of Einstein metrics in the conformal class as well as to the existence of conformal Killing spinors. In the talk I will explain classification results for conformal holonomy groups of Lorentzian manifolds. In particular, I will describe Lorentzian manifolds (M,g) with conformal holonomy group SU(1,m), which can be viewed as the conformal analogue of Calabi-Yau manifolds. Such Lorentzian metrics g, known as Fefferman metrics, appear on S^1-bundles over strictly pseudoconvex CR spin manifolds and admit a 2-parameter family of conformal Killing spinors.
New examples of totally disconnected, locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

I will attempt to explain what a totally disconnected, locally compact group is, and then describe some new work with George Willis on an attempt to create new examples based on Baumslag-Solitar groups, which are well known, tried and tested examples/counterexamples in geometric/combinatorial group theory. I will describe how to compute invariants of scale and flat rank for these groups.
What is a self-similar group?
15:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

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I will give a brief introduction to the theory of self-similar groups, focusing on a couple of pertinent examples: Grigorchuk's group of intermediate growth, and the basilica group.
Acyclic embeddings of open Riemann surfaces into new examples of elliptic manifolds
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

In complex geometry a manifold is Stein if there are, in a certain sense, "many" holomorphic maps from the manifold into C^n. While this has long been well understood, a fruitful definition of the dual notion has until recently been elusive. In Oka theory, a manifold is Oka if it satisfies several equivalent definitions, each stating that the manifold has "many" holomorphic maps into it from C^n. Related to this is the geometric condition of ellipticity due to Gromov, who showed that it implies a complex manifold is Oka. We present recent contributions to three open questions involving elliptic and Oka manifolds. We show that affine quotients of C^n are elliptic, and combine this with an example of Margulis to construct new elliptic manifolds of interesting homotopy types. It follows that every open Riemann surface properly acyclically embeds into an elliptic manifold, extending an existing result for open Riemann surfaces with abelian fundamental group.
On the full holonomy group of special Lorentzian manifolds
13:10 Fri 25 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

The holonomy group of a semi-Riemannian manifold is defined as the group of parallel transports along loops based at a point. Its connected component, the `restricted holonomy group', is given by restricting in this definition to contractible loops. The restricted holonomy can essentially be described by its Lie algebra and many classification results are obtained in this way. In contrast, the `full' holonomy group is a more global object and classification results are out of reach. In the talk I will describe recent results with H. Baum and K. Laerz (both HU Berlin) about the full holonomy group of so-called `indecomposable' Lorentzian manifolds. I will explain a construction method that arises from analysing the effects on holonomy when dividing the manifold by the action of a properly discontinuous group of isometries and present several examples of Lorentzian manifolds with disconnected holonomy groups.
Geometric modular representation theory
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Anthony Henderson :: University of Sydney

Representation theory is one of the oldest areas of algebra, but many basic questions in it are still unanswered. This is especially true in the modular case, where one considers vector spaces over a field F of positive characteristic; typically, complications arise for particular small values of the characteristic. For example, from a vector space V one can construct the symmetric square S^2(V), which is one easy example of a representation of the group GL(V). One would like to say that this representation is irreducible, but that statement is not always true: if F has characteristic 2, there is a nontrivial invariant subspace. Even for GL(V), we do not know the dimensions of all irreducible representations in all characteristics. In this talk, I will introduce some of the main ideas of geometric modular representation theory, a more recent approach which is making progress on some of these old problems. Essentially, the strategy is to re-formulate everything in terms of homology of various topological spaces, where F appears only as the field of coefficients and the spaces themselves are independent of F; thus, the modular anomalies in representation theory arise because homology with modular coefficients is detecting something about the topology that rational coefficients do not. In practice, the spaces are usually varieties over the complex numbers, and homology is replaced by intersection cohomology to take into account the singularities of these varieties.
A brief introduction to Support Vector Machines
12:30 Mon 4 Jun, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Tyman Stanford :: University of Adelaide

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Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are used in a variety of contexts for a range of purposes including regression, feature selection and classification. To convey the basic principles of SVMs, this presentation will focus on the application of SVMs to classification. Classification (or discrimination), in a statistical sense, is supervised model creation for the purpose of assigning future observations to a group or class. An example might be determining healthy or diseased labels to patients from p characteristics obtained from a blood sample. While SVMs are widely used, they are most successful when the data have one or more of the following properties: The data are not consistent with a standard probability distribution. The number of observations, n, used to create the model is less than the number of predictive features, p. (The so-called small-n, big-p problem.) The decision boundary between the classes is likely to be non-linear in the feature space. I will present a short overview of how SVMs are constructed, keeping in mind their purpose. As this presentation is part of a double post-grad seminar, I will keep it to a maximum of 15 minutes.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
IGA Workshop: Dendroidal sets
14:00 Tue 12 Jun, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Ittay Weiss :: University of the South Pacific

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A series of four 2-hour lectures by Dr. Ittay Weiss. The theory of dendroidal sets was introduced by Moerdijk and Weiss in 2007 in the study of homotopy operads in algebraic topology. In the five years that have past since then several fundamental and highly non-trivial results were established. For instance, it was established that dendroidal sets provide models for homotopy operads in a way that extends the Joyal-Lurie approach to homotopy categories. It can be shown that dendroidal sets provide new models in the study of n-fold loop spaces. And it is very recently shown that dendroidal sets model all connective spectra in a way that extends the modeling of certain spectra by Picard groupoids. The aim of the lecture series will be to introduce the concepts mentioned above, present the elementary theory, and understand the scope of the results mentioned as well as discuss the potential for further applications. Sources for the course will include the article "From Operads to Dendroidal Sets" (in the AMS volume on mathematical foundations of quantum field theory (also on the arXiv)) and the lecture notes by Ieke Moerdijk "simplicial methods for operads and algebraic geometry" which resulted from an advanced course given in Barcelona 3 years ago. No prior knowledge of operads will be assumed nor any knowledge of homotopy theory that is more advanced then what is required for the definition of the fundamental group. The basics of the language of presheaf categories will be recalled quickly and used freely.
The motivic logarithm and its realisations
13:10 Fri 3 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr James Borger :: Australian National University

When a complex manifold is defined by polynomial equations, its cohomology groups inherit extra structure. This was discovered by Hodge in the 1920s and 30s. When the defining polynomials have rational coefficients, there is some additional, arithmetic structure on the cohomology. This was discovered by Grothendieck and others in the 1960s. But here the situation is still quite mysterious because each cohomology group has infinitely many different arithmetic structures and while they are not directly comparable, they share many properties---with each other and with the Hodge structure. All written accounts of this that I'm aware of treat arbitrary varieties. They are beautifully abstract and non-explicit. In this talk, I'll take the opposite approach and try to give a flavour of the subject by working out a perhaps the simplest nontrivial example, the cohomology of C* relative to a subset of two points, in beautifully concrete and explicit detail. Here the common motif is the logarithm. In Hodge theory, it is realised as the complex logarithm; in the crystalline theory, it's as the p-adic logarithm; and in the etale theory, it's as Kummer theory. I'll assume you have some familiarity with usual, singular cohomology of topological spaces, but I won't assume that you know anything about these non-topological cohomology theories.
Hodge numbers and cohomology of complex algebraic varieties
13:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: University of Sydney

Let $X$ be a complex algebraic variety defined over the ring $\mathfrak{O}$ of integers in a number field $K$ and let $\Gamma$ be a group of $\mathfrak{O}$-automorphisms of $X$. I shall discuss how the counting of rational points over reductions mod $p$ of $X$, and an analysis of the Hodge structure of the cohomology of $X$, may be used to determine the cohomology as a $\Gamma$-module. This will include some joint work with Alex Dimca and with Mark Kisin, and some classical unsolved problems.
The fundamental theorems of invariant theory, classical and quantum
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: The University of Sydney

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Let V = C^n, and let (-,-) be a non-degenerate bilinear form on V , which is either symmetric or anti-symmetric. Write G for the isometry group of (V , (-,-)); thus G = O_n (C) or Sp_n (C). The first fundamental theorem (FFT) provides a set of generators for End_G(V^{\otimes r} ) (r = 1, 2, . . . ), while the second fundamental theorem (SFT) gives all relations among the generators. In 1937, Brauer formulated the FFT in terms of his celebrated 'Brauer algebra' B_r (\pm n), but there has hitherto been no similar version of the SFT. One problem has been the generic non-semisimplicity of B_r (\pm n), which caused H Weyl to call it, in his work on invariants 'that enigmatic algebra'. I shall present a solution to this problem, which shows that there is a single idempotent in B_r (\pm n), which describes all the relations. The proof is through a new 'Brauer category', in which the fundamental theorems are easily formulated, and where a calculus of tangles may be used to prove these results. There are quantum analogues of the fundamental theorems which I shall also discuss. There are numerous applications in representation theory, geometry and topology. This is joint work with Ruibin Zhang.
Air-cooled binary Rankine cycle performance with varying ambient temperature
12:10 Mon 13 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Josephine Varney :: University of Adelaide

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Next month, I have to give a presentation in Reno, Nevada to a group of geologists, engineers and geophysicists. So, for this talk, I am going to ask you to pretend you know very little about maths (and perhaps a lot about geology) and give me some feedback on my proposed talk. The presentation itself, is about the effect of air-cooling on geothermal power plant performance. Air-cooling is necessary for geothermal plays in dry areas, and ambient air temperature significantly affects the power output of air-cooled geothermal power plants. Hence, a method for determining the effect of ambient air temperature on geothermal power plants is presented. Using the ambient air temperature distribution from Leigh Creek, South Australia, this analysis shows that an optimally designed plant produces 6% more energy annually than a plant designed using the mean ambient temperature.
Dealing with some maths
12:10 Mon 20 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

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A group marched on a checkered path,
Bold but split in parts.
They turned and all were lost,
Save five regal hearts.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Classification of a family of symmetric graphs with complete quotients
13:10 Fri 7 Sep, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: A/Prof Sanming Zhou :: University of Melbourne

A finite graph is called symmetric if its automorphism group is transitive on the set of arcs (ordered pairs of adjacent vertices) of the graph. This is to say that all arcs have the same status in the graph. I will talk about recent results on the classification of a family of symmetric graphs with complete quotients. The most interesting graphs arising from this classification are defined in terms of Hermitian unitals (which are specific block designs), and they admit unitary groups as groups of automorphisms. I will also talk about applications of our results in constructing large symmetric graphs of given degree and diameter. This talk contains joint work with M. Giulietti, S. Marcugini and F. Pambianco.
Two classes of network structures that enable efficient information transmission
15:10 Fri 7 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Sanming Zhou :: The University of Melbourne

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What network topologies should we use in order to achieve efficient information transmission? Of course answer to this question depends on how we measure efficiency of information dissemination. If we measure it by the minimum gossiping time under the store-and-forward, all-port and full-duplex model, we show that certain Cayley graphs associated with Frobenius groups are `perfect' in a sense. (A Frobenius group is a permutation group which is transitive but not regular such that only the identity element can fix two points.) Such graphs are also optimal for all-to-all routing in the sense that the maximum load on edges achieves the minimum. In this talk we will discuss this theory of optimal network design.
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
13:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University, Hannover

Traditionally, the geometric quantisation of an action by a compact Lie group on a compact symplectic manifold is defined as the equivariant index of a certain Dirac operator. This index is a well-defined formal difference of finite-dimensional representations, since the Dirac operator is elliptic and the manifold and the group in question are compact. From a mathematical and physical point of view however, it is very desirable to extend geometric quantisation to noncompact groups and manifolds. Defining a suitable index is much harder in the noncompact setting, but several interesting results in this direction have been obtained. I will review the difficulties connected to noncompact geometric quantisation, and some of the solutions that have been proposed so far, mainly in connection to the "quantisation commutes with reduction" principle. (An introduction to this principle will be given in my talk at the Colloquium on the same day.)
The space of cubic rational maps
13:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

For each natural number d, the space of rational maps of degree d on the Riemann sphere has the structure of a complex manifold. The topology of these manifolds has been extensively studied. The recent development of Oka theory raises some new and interesting questions about their complex structure. We apply geometric invariant theory to the degree 3 case, studying a double action of the Mobius group on the space of cubic rational maps. We show that the categorical quotient is C, and that the space of cubic rational maps enjoys the holomorphic flexibility properties of strong dominability and C-connectedness.
Stably Cayley groups over fields of characteristic 0
11:10 Mon 17 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Nicole Lemire :: University of Western Ontario

A linear algebraic group is called a Cayley group if it is equivariantly birationally isomorphic to its Lie algebra. It is stably Cayley if the product of the group and some torus is Cayley. Cayley gave the first examples of Cayley groups with his Cayley map back in 1846. Over an algebraically closed field of characteristic 0, Cayley and stably Cayley simple groups were classified by Lemire, Popov and Reichstein in 2006. In recent joint work with Blunk, Borovoi, Kunyavskii and Reichstein, we classify the simple stably Cayley groups over an arbitrary field of characteristic 0.
Twistor space for rolling bodies
12:10 Fri 15 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Pawel Nurowski :: University of Warsaw

We consider a configuration space of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, and identify it with an open subset U of R^5, equipped with a generic distribution D of 2-planes. We will discuss symmetry properties of the pair (U,D) and will mention that, in the case of the two solids being balls, when changing the ratio of their radii, the dimension of the group of local symmetries unexpectedly jumps from 6 to 14. This occurs for only one such ratio, and in such case the local group of symmetries of the pair (U,D) is maximal. It is maximal not only among the balls with various radii, but more generally among all (U,D)s corresponding to configuration spaces of two solids rolling on each other without slipping or twisting. This maximal group is isomorphic to the split real form of the exceptional Lie group G2. In the remaining part of the talk we argue how to identify the space U from the pair (U,D) defined above with the bundle T of totally null real 2-planes over a 4-manifold equipped with a split signature metric. We call T the twistor bundle for rolling bodies. We show that the rolling distribution D, can be naturally identified with an appropriately defined twistor distribution on T. We use this formulation of the rolling system to find more surfaces which, when rigidly rolling on each other without slipping or twisting, have the local group of symmetries isomorphic to the exceptional group G2.
Gauge groupoid cocycles and Cheeger-Simons differential characters
13:10 Fri 5 Apr, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Jouko Mickelsson :: Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Groups of gauge transformations in quantum field theory are typically extended by a 2-cocycle with values in a certain abelian group due to chiral symmetry breaking. For these extensions there exist a global explicit construction since the 1980's. I shall study the higher group cocycles following a recent paper by F. Wagemann and C. Wockel, but extending to the transformation groupoid setting (motivated by QFT) and discussing potential obstructions in the construction due to a nonvanishing of low dimensional homology groups of the gauge group. The resolution of the obstruction is obtained by an application of the Cheeger-Simons differential characters.
An Oka principle for equivariant isomorphisms
12:10 Fri 3 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will discuss new joint work with Frank Kutzschebauch (Bern) and Gerald Schwarz (Brandeis). Let $G$ be a reductive complex Lie group acting holomorphically on Stein manifolds $X$ and $Y$, which are locally $G$-biholomorphic over a common categorical quotient $Q$. When is there a global $G$-biholomorphism $X\to Y$? In a situation that we describe, with some justification, as generic, we prove that the obstruction to solving this local-to-global problem is topological and provide sufficient conditions for it to vanish. Our main tool is the equivariant version of Grauert's Oka principle due to Heinzner and Kutzschebauch. We prove that $X$ and $Y$ are $G$-biholomorphic if $X$ is $K$-contractible, where $K$ is a maximal compact subgroup of $G$, or if there is a $G$-diffeomorphism $X\to Y$ over $Q$, which is holomorphic when restricted to each fibre of the quotient map $X\to Q$. When $G$ is abelian, we obtain stronger theorems. Our results can be interpreted as instances of the Oka principle for sections of the sheaf of $G$-biholomorphisms from $X$ to $Y$ over $Q$. This sheaf can be badly singular, even in simply defined examples. Our work is in part motivated by the linearisation problem for actions on $\C^n$. It follows from one of our main results that a holomorphic $G$-action on $\C^n$, which is locally $G$-biholomorphic over a common quotient to a generic linear action, is linearisable.
Crystallographic groups I: the classical theory
12:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A discrete isometry group acting properly discontinuously on the n-dimensional Euclidean space with compact quotient is called a crystallographic group. This name reflects the fact that in dimension n=3 their compact fundamental domains resemble a space-filling crystal pattern. For higher dimensions, Hilbert posed his famous 18th problem: "Is there in n-dimensional Euclidean space only a finite number of essentially different kinds of groups of motions with a [compact] fundamental region?" This problem was solved by Bieberbach when he proved that in every dimension n there exists only a finite number of isomorphic crystallographic groups and also gave a description of these groups. From the perspective of differential geometry these results are of major importance, as crystallographic groups are precisely the fundamental groups of compact flat Riemannian orbifolds. The quotient is even a manifold if the fundamental group is required to be torsion-free, in which case it is called a Bieberbach group. Moreover, for a flat manifold the fundamental group completely determines the holonomy group. In this talk I will discuss the properties of crystallographic groups, study examples in dimension n=2 and n=3, and present the three Bieberbach theorems on the structure of crystallographic groups.
Coincidences
14:10 Mon 20 May, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof. Robb Muirhead :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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This is a lighthearted (some would say content-free) talk about coincidences, those surprising concurrences of events that are often perceived as meaningfully related, with no apparent causal connection. Time permitting, it will touch on topics like:
Patterns in data and the dangers of looking for patterns, unspecified ahead of time, and trying to "explain" them; e.g. post hoc subgroup analyses, cancer clusters, conspiracy theories ...
Matching problems; e.g. the birthday problem and extensions
People who win a lottery more than once -- how surprised should we really be? What's the question we should be asking?
When you become familiar with a new word, and see it again soon afterwards, how surprised should you be?
Caution: This is a shortened version of a talk that was originally prepared for a group of non-mathematicians and non-statisticians, so it's mostly non-technical. It probably does not contain anything you don't already know -- it will be an amazing coincidence if it does!
Crystallographic groups II: generalisations
12:10 Fri 24 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

The theory of crystallographic groups acting cocompactly on Euclidean space can be extended and generalised in many different ways. For example, instead of studying discrete groups of Euclidean isometries, one can consider groups of isometries for indefinite inner products. These are the fundamental groups of compact flat pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. Still more generally, one might study group of affine transformation on n-space that are not required to preserve any bilinear form. Also, the condition of cocompactness can be dropped. In this talk, I will present some of the results obtained for these generalisations, and also discuss some of my own work on flat homogeneous pseudo-Riemannian spaces.
Quantization, Representations and the Orbit Philosophy
15:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

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This talk will be about the mathematics of quantization and about representation theory, where the concept of quantization seems to be especially relevant. It was discovered by Kirillov in the 1960's that the representation theory of nilpotent Lie groups (such as the group that encodes Heisenberg's commutation relations) can be beautifully and efficiently described using a vocabulary drawn from geometry and quantum mechanics. The description was soon adapted to other classes of Lie groups, and the expectation that it ought to apply almost universally has come to be called the "orbit philosophy." But despite early successes, the orbit philosophy is in a decidedly unfinished state. I'll try to explain some of the issues and some possible new directions.
Symplectic Lie groups
12:10 Fri 9 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A "symplectic Lie group" is a Lie group G with a symplectic form such that G acts by symplectic transformations on itself. Such a G cannot be semisimple, so the research focuses on solvable symplectic Lie groups. In the compact case, a classification of these groups is known. In many cases, a solvable symplectic Lie group G is a cotangent bundle of a flat Lie group H. Then H is a Lagrange subgroup of G, meaning its Lie algebra h is isotropic in the Lie algebra g of G. The existence of Lagrange subalgebras or ideals in g is an important question which relates to many problems in the general structure theory of symplectic Lie groups. In my talk, I will give a brief overview of the known results in this field, ranging from the 1970s to a very recent structure theory.
A survey of non-abelian cohomology
12:10 Fri 16 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Adelaide

If G is a topological group, not necessarily abelian, then the set H^1(M,G) has a natural interpretation in terms of principal G-bundles on the space M. In this talk I will describe higher degree analogs of both the set H^1(M,G) and the notion of a principal bundle (the latter is closely connected to the subject of bundle gerbes). I will explain, following work of Joyal, Jardine and many others, how the language of abstract homotopy theory gives a very convenient framework for discussing these ideas.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 23 Aug, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Barry Cox, Professor Tony Roberts & Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

Talk: Dr Barry Cox - 'Conformation space of seven-member rings'. Work in progress discussion: Professor Tony Roberts - Macroscale PDEs emerge from microscale dynamics with quantified errors Stephen Wade - Trapped waves in flow past a trench
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 13 Sep, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya and Dr Michael Chen :: University of Adelaide

Talks: Nonautonomous control of invariant manifolds - Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: Interface problems in viscous flow - Dr Michael Chen
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

In this talk we shall report on a program of using the recent framework of twisted spectral triples to study conformal geometry from a noncommutative geometric perspective. One result is a local index formula in conformal geometry taking into account the action of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms. Another result is a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality for twisted spectral triples. Geometric applications include a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality in conformal geometry. There are also noncommutative versions for spectral triples over noncommutative tori and duals of discrete cocompact subgroups of semisimple Lie groups satisfying the Baum-Connes conjecture. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Symmetry gaps for geometric structures
15:10 Fri 20 Sep, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dennis The :: Australian National University

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Klein's Erlangen program classified geometries based on their (transitive) groups of symmetries, e.g. Euclidean geometry is the quotient of the rigid motion group by the subgroup of rotations. While this perspective is homogeneous, Riemann's generalization of Euclidean geometry is in general very "lumpy" - i.e. there exist Riemannian manifolds that have no symmetries at all. A common generalization where a group still plays a dominant role is Cartan geometry, which first arose in Cartan's solution to the equivalence problem for geometric structures, and which articulates what a "curved version" of a flat (homogeneous) model means. Parabolic geometries are Cartan geometries modelled on (generalized) flag varieties (e.g. projective space, isotropic Grassmannians) which are well-known objects from the representation theory of semisimple Lie groups. These curved versions encompass a zoo of interesting geometries, including conformal, projective, CR, systems of 2nd order ODE, etc. This interaction between differential geometry and representation theory has proved extremely fruitful in recent years. My talk will be an example-based tour of various types of parabolic geometries, which I'll use to outline some of the main aspects of the theory (suppressing technical details). The main thread throughout the talk will be the symmetry gap problem: For a given type of Cartan geometry, the maximal symmetry dimension is realized by the flat model, but what is the next possible ("submaximal") symmetry dimension? I'll sketch a recent solution (in joint work with Boris Kruglikov) for a wide class of parabolic geometries which gives a combinatorial recipe for reading the submaximal symmetry dimension from a Dynkin diagram.
The irrational line on the torus
12:35 Mon 23 Sep, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Kelli Francis-Staite :: University of Adelaide

The torus is very common example of a surface in R^3, but it's a lot more interesting than just a donut! I will introduce some standard mathematical descriptions of the torus, a bit of number theory, and finally what the irrational line on the torus is. Why is this interesting? Well despite donuts being yummy to eat, the irrational line on the torus gives a range of pathological counter-examples. In Differential Geometry, it is an example of a manifold that is a subset of another manifold, but not a submanifold. In Lie theory, it is an example of a subgroup of a Lie group which is not a Lie subgroup. If that wasn't enough of a mouthful, I may also provide some sweet incentives to come along! Does anyone know the location of a good donut store?
Localised index and L^2-Lefschetz fixed point formula
12:10 Fri 25 Oct, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

In this talk we introduce a class of localised indices for the Dirac type operators on a complete Riemannian manifold, where a discrete group acts properly, co-compactly and isometrically. These localised indices, generalising the L^2-index of Atiyah, are obtained by taking Hattori-Stallings traces of the higher index for the Dirac type operators. We shall talk about some motivation and applications for working on localised indices. The talk is related to joint work with Bai-Ling Wang.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 25 Oct, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Ben Binder and Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

Dr Ben Binder :: 'An inverse approach for solutions to free-surface flow problems' :: Abstract: Surface water waves are familiar to most people, for example, the wave pattern generated at the stern of a ship. The boundary or interface between the air and water is called the free-surface. When determining a solution to a free-surface flow problem it is commonplace for the forcing (eg. shape of ship or waterbed topography) that creates the surface waves to be prescribed, with the free-surface coming as part of the solution. Alternatively, one can choose to prescribe the shape of the free-surface and find the forcing inversely. In this talk I will discuss my ongoing work using an inverse approach to discover new types of solutions to free-surface flow problems in two and three dimensions, and how the predictions of the method might be verified with experiments. :: Mr David Wilke:: 'A Computational Fluid Dynamic Study of Blood Flow Within the Coiled Umbilical Arteries':: Abstract: The umbilical cord is the lifeline of the fetus throughout gestation. In a normal pregnancy it facilitates the supply of oxygen and nutrients from the placenta via a single vein, in addition to the return of deoxygenated blood from the developing embryo or fetus via two umbilical arteries. Despite the major role it plays in the growth of the fetus, pathologies of the umbilical cord are poorly understood. In particular, variations in the cord geometry, which typically forms a helical arrangement, have been correlated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Cords exhibiting either abnormally low or high levels of coiling have been associated with pathological results including growth-restriction and fetal demise. Despite this, the methodology currently employed by clinicians to characterise umbilical pathologies can misdiagnose cords and is prone to error. In this talk a computational model of blood flow within rigid three-dimensional structures representative of the umbilical arteries will be presented. This study determined that the current characterization was unable to differentiate between cords which exhibited clinically distinguishable flow properties, including the cord pressure drop, which provides a measure of the loading on the fetal heart.
Modelling and optimisation of group dose-response challenge experiments
12:10 Mon 28 Oct, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Price :: University of Adelaide

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An important component of scientific research is the 'experiment'. Effective design of these experiments is important and, accordingly, has received significant attention under the heading 'optimal experimental design'. However, until recently, little work has been done on optimal experimental design for experiments where the underlying process can be modelled by a Markov chain. In this talk, I will discuss some of the work that has been done in the field of optimal experimental design for Markov Chains, and some of the work that I have done in applying this theory to dose-response challenge experiments for the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni in chickens.
The geometry of rolling surfaces and non-holonomic mechanics
15:10 Fri 1 Nov, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Robert Bryant :: Duke University

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In mechanics, the system of a sphere rolling over a plane without slipping or twisting is a fundamental example of what is called a non-holonomic mechanical system, the study of which belongs to the subject of control theory. The more general case of one surface rolling over another without slipping or twisting is, similarly, of great interest for both practical and theoretical reasons. In this talk, which is intended for a general mathematical audience (i.e., no familiarity with control theory or differential geometry will be assumed), I will describe some of the basic features of this problem, a bit of its history, and some of the surprising developments that its study reveals, such as the unexpected appearance of the exceptional group G_2.
Buoyancy driven exchange flows in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs
15:10 Mon 2 Dec, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Professor John Patterson :: University of Sydney

Natural convection is the flow driven by differences in density, and is ubiquitous in nature and industry. It is the source of most environmental flows, and is the basis for almost all industrial heat exchange processes. It operates on both massive and micro scales. It is usually considered as a flow driven by temperature gradients, but could equally be from a gradient in any density determining property - salinity is one obvious example. It also depends on gravity; so magnetohydrodynamics becomes relevant as well. One particular interesting and environmentally relevant flow is the exchange flow in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs. This occurs because of the effects of a decreasing depth approaching the shore resulting laterally unequal heat loss and heat gain during the diurnal cooling and heating cycle. This presentation will discuss some of the results obtained by the Natural Convection Group at Sydney University in analytical, numerical and experimental investigations of this mechanism, and the implications for lake water quality.
Reductive group actions and some problems concerning their quotients
12:10 Fri 17 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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We will gently introduce the concept of a complex reductive group and the notion of the quotient Z of a complex vector space V on which our complex reductive group G acts linearly. There is the quotient mapping p from V to Z. The quotient is an affine variety with a stratification coming from the group action. Let f be an automorphism of Z. We consider the following questions (and give some answers). 1) Does f preserve the stratification of Z, i.e., does it permute the strata? 2) Is there a lift F of f? This means that F maps V to V and p(F(v))=f(p(v)) for all v in V. 3) Can we arrange that F is equivariant? We show that 1) is almost always true, that 2) is true in a lot of cases and that a twisted version of 3) then holds.
The density property for complex manifolds: a strong form of holomorphic flexibility
12:10 Fri 24 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

Compared with the real differentiable case, complex manifolds in general are more rigid, their groups of holomorphic diffeomorphisms are rather small (in general trivial). A long known exception to this behavior is affine n-space C^n for n at least 2. Its group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is infinite dimensional. In the late 1980s Andersen and Lempert proved a remarkable theorem which stated in its generalized version due to Forstneric and Rosay that any local holomorphic phase flow given on a Runge subset of C^n can be locally uniformly approximated by a global holomorphic diffeomorphism. The main ingredient in the proof was formalized by Varolin and called the density property: The Lie algebra generated by complete holomorphic vector fields is dense in the Lie algebra of all holomorphic vector fields. In these manifolds a similar local to global approximation of Andersen-Lempert type holds. It is a precise way of saying that the group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is large. In the talk we will explain how this notion is related to other more recent flexibility notions in complex geometry, in particular to the notion of a Oka-Forstneric manifold. We will give examples of manifolds with the density property and sketch applications of the density property. If time permits we will explain criteria for the density property developed by Kaliman and the speaker.
Integrability of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras and Lie algebroids
12:10 Fri 7 Feb, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Christoph Wockel :: Hamburg University

Lie's Third Theorem states that each finite-dimensional Lie algebra is the Lie algebra of a Lie group (we also say "integrates to a Lie group"). The corresponding statement for infinite-dimensional Lie algebras or Lie algebroids is false and we will explain geometrically why this is the case. The underlying pattern is that of integration of central extensions of Lie algebras and Lie algebroids. This also occurs in other contexts, and we will explain some aspects of string group models in these terms. In the end we will sketch how the non-integrability of Lie algebras and Lie algebroids can be overcome by passing to higher categorical objects (such as smooth stacks) and give a panoramic (but still conjectural) perspective on the precise relation of the various integrability problems.
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
12:10 Fri 7 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

Geometric quantisation is a way to construct quantum mechanical phase spaces (Hilbert spaces) from classical mechanical phase spaces (symplectic manifolds). In the presence of a group action, the quantisation commutes with reduction principle states that geometric quantisation should be compatible with the ways the group action can be used to simplify (reduce) the classical and quantum phase spaces. This has deep consequences for the link between symplectic geometry and representation theory. The quantisation commutes with reduction principle has been given explicit meaning, and been proved, in cases where the symplectic manifold and the group acting on it are compact. There have also been results where just the group, or the orbit space of the action, is assumed to be compact. These are important and difficult, but it is somewhat frustrating that they do not even apply to the simplest example from the physics point of view: a free particle in Rn. This talk is about a joint result with Mathai Varghese where the group, manifold and orbit space may all be noncompact.
What Technical Performance Measures are Critical to Evaluate Geothermal Developments?
12:10 Mon 17 Mar, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Jo Varney :: University of Adelaide

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Josephine Varney, Nigel Bean and Betina Bendall. When geologists, geophysicists and engineers study geothermal developments, each group has their own set of technical performance measures. While these performance measures tell each group something important about the geothermal development, there is often difficulty in translating these technical performance measures into financial performance measures for investors. In this paper, we argue that brine effectiveness is the best, simple financial performance measure for a geothermal investor. This is because it is a good, yet simple indicator of ROI (return on investment); and importantly, links well production to power plant production, hence describes the geothermal development in a holistic sense.
A model for the BitCoin block chain that takes propagation delays into account
15:10 Fri 28 Mar, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Peter Taylor :: The University of Melbourne

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Unlike cash transactions, most electronic transactions require the presence of a trusted authority to verify that the payer has sufficient funding to be able to make the transaction and to adjust the account balances of the payer and payee. In recent years BitCoin has been proposed as an "electronic equivalent of cash". The general idea is that transactions are verified in a coded form in a block chain, which is maintained by the community of participants. Problems can arise when the block chain splits: that is different participants have different versions of the block chain, something which can happen only when there are propagation delays, at least if all participants are behaving according to the protocol. In this talk I shall present a preliminary model for the splitting behaviour of the block chain. I shall then go on to perform a similar analysis for a situation where a group of participants has adopted a recently-proposed strategy for gaining a greater advantage from BitCoin processing than its combined computer power should be able to control.
A generalised Kac-Peterson cocycle
11:10 Thu 17 Apr, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Pedram Hekmati :: University of Adelaide

The Kac-Peterson cocycle appears in the study of highest weight modules of infinite dimensional Lie algebras and determines a central extension. The vanishing of its cohomology class is tied to the existence of a cubic Dirac operator whose square is a quadratic Casimir element. I will introduce a closely related Lie algebra cocycle that comes about when constructing spin representations and gives rise to a Banach Lie group with a highly nontrivial topology. I will also explain how to make sense of the cubic Dirac operator in this setting and discuss its relation to twisted K-theory. This is joint work with Jouko Mickelsson.
Outlier removal using the Bayesian information criterion for group-based trajectory modelling
12:10 Mon 28 Apr, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Chris Davies :: University of Adelaide

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Attributes measured longitudinally can be used to define discrete paths of measurements, or trajectories, for each individual in a given population. Group-based trajectory modelling methods can be used to identify subgroups of trajectories within a population, such that trajectories that are grouped together are more similar to each other than to trajectories in distinct groups. Existing methods generally allocate every individual trajectory into one of the estimated groups. However this does not allow for the possibility that some individuals may be following trajectories so different from the rest of the population that they should not be included in a group-based trajectory model. This results in these outlying trajectories being treated as though they belong to one of the groups, distorting the estimated trajectory groups and any subsequent analyses that use them. We have developed an algorithm for removing outlying trajectories based on the maximum change in Bayesian information criterion (BIC) due to removing a single trajectory. As well as deciding which trajectory to remove, the number of groups in the model can also change. The decision to remove an outlying trajectory is made by comparing the log-likelihood contributions of the observations to those of simulated samples from the estimated group-based trajectory model. In this talk the algorithm will be detailed and an application of its use will be demonstrated.
Computing with groups
15:10 Fri 30 May, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Heiko Dietrich :: Monash University

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Groups are algebraic structures which show up in many branches of mathematics and other areas of science; Computational Group Theory is on the cutting edge of pure research in group theory and its interplay with computational methods. In this talk, we consider a practical aspect of Computational Group Theory: how to represent a group in a computer, and how to work with such a description efficiently. We will first recall some well-established methods for permutation group; we will then discuss some recent progress for matrix groups.
Oka properties of groups of holomorphic and algebraic automorphisms of complex affine space
12:10 Fri 6 Jun, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will discuss new joint work with Franc Forstneric. The group of holomorphic automorphisms of complex affine space C^n, n>1, is huge. It is not an infinite-dimensional manifold in any recognised sense. Still, our work shows that in some ways it behaves like a finite-dimensional Oka manifold.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 6 Jun, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Meng Cao and Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

Meng Cao:: Multiscale modelling couples patches of nonlinear wave-like simulations :: Abstract: The multiscale gap-tooth scheme is built from given microscale simulations of complicated physical processes to empower macroscale simulations. By coupling small patches of simulations over unsimulated physical gaps, large savings in computational time are possible. So far the gap-tooth scheme has been developed for dissipative systems, but wave systems are also of great interest. This article develops the gap-tooth scheme to the case of nonlinear microscale simulations of wave-like systems. Classic macroscale interpolation provides a generic coupling between patches that achieves arbitrarily high order consistency between the multiscale scheme and the underlying microscale dynamics. Eigen-analysis indicates that the resultant gap-tooth scheme empowers feasible computation of large scale simulations of wave-like dynamics with complicated underlying physics. As an pilot study, we implement numerical simulations of dam-breaking waves by the gap-tooth scheme. Comparison between a gap-tooth simulation, a microscale simulation over the whole domain, and some published experimental data on dam breaking, demonstrates that the gap-tooth scheme feasibly computes large scale wave-like dynamics with computational savings. Trent Mattner :: Coupled atmosphere-fire simulations of the Canberra 2003 bushfires using WRF-Sfire :: Abstract: The Canberra fires of January 18, 2003 are notorious for the extreme fire behaviour and fire-atmosphere-topography interactions that occurred, including lee-slope fire channelling, pyrocumulonimbus development and tornado formation. In this talk, I will discuss coupled fire-weather simulations of the Canberra fires using WRF-SFire. In these simulations, a fire-behaviour model is used to dynamically predict the evolution of the fire front according to local atmospheric and topographic conditions, as well as the associated heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. It is found that the predicted fire front and heat flux is not too bad, bearing in mind the complexity of the problem and the severe modelling assumptions made. However, the predicted moisture flux is too low, which has some impact on atmospheric dynamics.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian solvmanifolds
12:10 Fri 17 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A compact solvmanifold M is a quotient of a solvable Lie group G by a cocompact closed subgroup H. A pseudo-Riemannian metric on M is induced by an H-invariant symmetric 2-tensor on G. In this talk I will describe some foundations and results of my ongoing work with Oliver Baues on the nature of this 2-tensor and what it can imply for the subgroup H.
Nonlinear analysis over infinite dimensional spaces and its applications
12:10 Fri 6 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Tsuyoshi Kato :: Kyoto University

In this talk we develop moduli theory of holomorphic curves over infinite dimensional manifolds consisted by sequences of almost Kaehler manifolds. Under the assumption of high symmetry, we verify that many mechanisms of the standard moduli theory over closed symplectic manifolds also work over these infinite dimensional spaces. As an application, we study deformation theory of discrete groups acting on trees. There is a canonical way, up to conjugacy to embed such groups into the automorphism group over the infinite projective space. We verify that for some class of Hamiltonian functions, the deformed groups must be always asymptotically infinite.
Tannaka duality for stacks
12:10 Fri 6 Mar, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Jack Hall :: Australian National University

Traditionally, Tannaka duality is used to reconstruct a group from its representations. I will describe a reformulation of this duality for stacks, which is due to Lurie, and briefly touch on some applications.
Singular Pfaffian systems in dimension 6
12:10 Fri 20 Mar, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Pawel Nurowski :: Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences

We consider a pair of rank 3 distributions in dimension 6 with some remarkable properties. They define an analog of the celebrated nearly-Kahler structure on the 6 sphere, with the exceptional simple Lie group G2 as a group of symmetries. In our case the metric associated with the structure is pseudo-Riemannian, of split signature. The 6 manifold has a 5-dimensional boundary with interesting induced geometry. This structure on the boundary has no analog in the Riemannian case.
Groups acting on trees
12:10 Fri 10 Apr, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Anitha Thillaisundaram :: Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf

From a geometric point of view, branch groups are groups acting spherically transitively on a spherically homogeneous rooted tree. The applications of branch groups reach out to analysis, geometry, combinatorics, and probability. The early construction of branch groups were the Grigorchuk group and the Gupta-Sidki p-groups. Among its many claims to fame, the Grigorchuk group was the first example of a group of intermediate growth (i.e. neither polynomial nor exponential). Here we consider a generalisation of the family of Grigorchuk-Gupta-Sidki groups, and we examine the restricted occurrence of their maximal subgroups.
Group Meeting
15:10 Fri 24 Apr, 2015 :: N218 Engineering North :: Dr Ben Binder :: University of Adelaide

Talk (Dr Ben Binder): How do we quantify the filamentous growth in a yeast colony? Abstract: In this talk we will develop a systematic method to measure the spatial patterning of yeast colony morphology. The methods are applicable to other physical systems with circular spatial domains, for example, batch mixing fluid devices. A hybrid modelling approach of the yeast growth process will also be discussed. After the seminar, Ben will start a group discussion by sharing some information and experiences on attracting honours/PhD students to the group.
Monodromy of the Hitchin system and components of representation varieties
12:10 Fri 29 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

Representations of the fundamental group of a compact Riemann surface into a reductive Lie group form a moduli space, called a representation variety. An outstanding problem in topology is to determine the number of components of these varieties. Through a deep result known as non-abelian Hodge theory, representation varieties are homeomorphic to moduli spaces of certain holomorphic objects called Higgs bundles. In this talk I will describe recent joint work with L. Schaposnik computing the monodromy of the Hitchin fibration for Higgs bundle moduli spaces. Our results give a new unified proof of the number of components of several representation varieties.
Group Meeting
15:10 Fri 29 May, 2015 :: EM 213 :: Dr Judy Bunder :: University of Adelaide

Talk : Patch dynamics for efficient exascale simulations Abstract Massive parallelisation has lead to a dramatic increase in available computational power. However, data transfer speeds have failed to keep pace and are the major limiting factor in the development of exascale computing. New algorithms must be developed which minimise the transfer of data. Patch dynamics is a computational macroscale modelling scheme which provides a coarse macroscale solution of a problem defined on a fine microscale by dividing the domain into many nonoverlapping, coupled patches. Patch dynamics is readily adaptable to massive parallelisation as each processor core can evaluate the dynamics on one, or a few, patches. However, patch coupling conditions interpolate across the unevaluated parts of the domain between patches and require almost continuous data transfer. We propose a modified patch dynamics scheme which minimises data transfer by only reevaluating the patch coupling conditions at `mesoscale' time scales which are significantly larger than the microscale time of the microscale problem. We analyse and quantify the error arising from patch dynamics with mesoscale temporal coupling.
Dirac operators and Hamiltonian loop group action
12:10 Fri 24 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Yanli Song :: University of Toronto

A definition to the geometric quantization for compact Hamiltonian G-spaces is given by Bott, defined as the index of the Spinc-Dirac operator on the manifold. In this talk, I will explain how to generalize this idea to the Hamiltonian LG-spaces. Instead of quantizing infinite-dimensional manifolds directly, we use its equivalent finite-dimensional model, the quasi-Hamiltonian G-spaces. By constructing twisted spinor bundle and twisted pre-quantum bundle on the quasi-Hamiltonian G-space, we define a Dirac operator whose index are given by positive energy representation of loop groups. A key role in the construction will be played by the algebraic cubic Dirac operator for loop algebra. If time permitted, I will also explain how to prove the quantization commutes with reduction theorem for Hamiltonian LG-spaces under this framework.
Quantising proper actions on Spin-c manifolds
11:00 Fri 31 Jul, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli Level 7 Room 7.15 :: Peter Hochs :: The University of Adelaide

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For a proper action by a Lie group on a Spin-c manifold (both of which may be noncompact), we study an index of deformations of the Spin-c Dirac operator, acting on the space of spinors invariant under the group action. When applied to spinors that are square integrable transversally to orbits in a suitable sense, the kernel of this operator turns out to be finite-dimensional, under certain hypotheses of the deformation. This also allows one to show that the index has the quantisation commutes with reduction property (as proved by Meinrenken in the compact symplectic case, and by Paradan-Vergne in the compact Spin-c case), for sufficiently large powers of the determinant line bundle. Furthermore, this result extends to Spin-c Dirac operators twisted by vector bundles. A key ingredient of the arguments is the use of a family of inner products on the Lie algebra, depending on a point in the manifold. This is joint work with Mathai Varghese.
Equivariant bundle gerbes
12:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Michael Murray :: The University of Adelaide

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I will present the definitions of strong and weak group actions on a bundle gerbe and calculate the strongly equivariant class of the basic bundle gerbe on a unitary group. This is joint work with David Roberts, Danny Stevenson and Raymond Vozzo and forms part of arXiv:1506.07931.
Base change and K-theory
12:10 Fri 18 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Hang Wang :: The University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of an algebraic group can be classified by K-theory of the corresponding group C^*-algebra. We use Archimedean base change between Langlands parameters of real and complex algebraic groups to compare K-theory of the corresponding C^*-algebras of groups over different number fields. This is work in progress with K.F. Chao.
Real Lie Groups and Complex Flag Manifolds
12:10 Fri 9 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Joseph A. Wolf :: University of California, Berkeley

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Let G be a complex simple direct limit group. Let G_R be a real form of G that corresponds to an hermitian symmetric space. I'll describe the corresponding bounded symmetric domain in the context of the Borel embedding, Cayley transforms, and the Bergman-Shilov boundary. Let Q be a parabolic subgroup of G. In finite dimensions this means that G/Q is a complex projective variety, or equivalently has a Kaehler metric invariant under a maximal compact subgroup of G. Then I'll show just how the bounded symmetric domains describe cycle spaces for open G_R orbits on G/Q. These cycle spaces include the complex bounded symmetric domains. In finite dimensions they are tightly related to moduli spaces for compact Kaehler manifolds and to representations of semisimple Lie groups; in infinite dimensions there are more problems than answers. Finally, time permitting, I'll indicate how some of this goes over to real and to quaternionic bounded symmetric domains.
Chern-Simons classes on loop spaces and diffeomorphism groups
12:10 Fri 16 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Steve Rosenberg :: Boston University

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Not much is known about the topology of the diffeomorphism group Diff(M) of manifolds M of dimension four and higher. We'll show that for a class of manifolds of dimension 4k+1, Diff(M) has infinite fundamental group. This is proved by translating the problem into a question about Chern-Simons classes on the tangent bundle to the loop space LM. To build the CS classes, we use a family of metrics on LM associated to a Riemannian metric on M. The curvature of these metrics takes values in an algebra of pseudodifferential operators. The main technical step in the CS construction is to replace the ordinary matrix trace in finite dimensions with the Wodzicki residue, the unique trace on this algebra. The moral is that some techniques in finite dimensional Riemannian geometry can be extended to some examples in infinite dimensional geometry.
Quasi-isometry classification of certain hyperbolic Coxeter groups
11:00 Fri 23 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli Conference Room 7.15 (Level 7) :: Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

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Let Gamma be a finite simple graph with vertex set S. The associated right-angled Coxeter group W is the group with generating set S, so that s^2 = 1 for all s in S and st = ts if and only if s and t are adjacent vertices in Gamma. Moussong proved that the group W is hyperbolic in the sense of Gromov if and only if Gamma has no "empty squares". We consider the quasi-isometry classification of such Coxeter groups using the local cut point structure of their visual boundaries. In particular, we find an algorithm for computing Bowditch's JSJ tree for a class of these groups, and prove that two such groups are quasi-isometric if and only if their JSJ trees are the same. This is joint work with Pallavi Dani (Louisiana State University).
Use of epidemic models in optimal decision making
15:00 Thu 19 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Tim Kinyanjui :: School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester

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Epidemic models have proved useful in a number of applications in epidemiology. In this work, I will present two areas that we have used modelling to make informed decisions. Firstly, we have used an age structured mathematical model to describe the transmission of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in a developed country setting and to explore different vaccination strategies. We found that delayed infant vaccination has significant potential in reducing the number of hospitalisations in the most vulnerable group and that most of the reduction is due to indirect protection. It also suggests that marked public health benefit could be achieved through RSV vaccine delivered to age groups not seen as most at risk of severe disease. The second application is in the optimal design of studies aimed at collection of household-stratified infection data. A design decision involves making a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used study designs are considered: cross-sectional and cohort. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information for each design. We found that for the cross-sectional designs, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity while the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing data collection studies.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
Oka principles and the linearization problem
12:10 Fri 8 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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Let G be a reductive complex Lie group (e.g., SL(n,C)) and let X and Y be Stein manifolds (closed complex submanifolds of some C^n). Suppose that G acts freely on X and Y. Then there are quotient Stein manifolds X/G and Y/G and quotient mappings p_X:X-> X/G and p_Y: Y-> Y/G such that X and Y are principal G-bundles over X/G and Y/G. Let us suppose that Q=X/G ~= Y/G so that X and Y have the same quotient Q. A map Phi: X\to Y of principal bundles (over Q) is simply an equivariant continuous map commuting with the projections. That is, Phi(gx)=g Phi(x) for all g in G and x in X, and p_X=p_Y o Phi. The famous Oka Principle of Grauert says that any Phi as above embeds in a continuous family Phi_t: X -> Y, t in [0,1], where Phi_0=Phi, all the Phi_t satisfy the same conditions as Phi does and Phi_1 is holomorphic. This is rather amazing. We consider the case where G does not necessarily act freely on X and Y. There is still a notion of quotient and quotient mappings p_X: X-> X//G and p_Y: Y-> Y//G where X//G and Y//G are now Stein spaces and parameterize the closed G-orbits in X and Y. We assume that Q~= X//G~= Y//G and that we have a continuous equivariant Phi such that p_X=p_Y o Phi. We find conditions under which Phi embeds into a continuous family Phi_t such that Phi_1 is holomorphic. We give an application to the Linearization Problem. Let G act holomorphically on C^n. When is there a biholomorphic map Phi:C^n -> C^n such that Phi^{-1} o g o Phi in GL(n,C) for all g in G? We find a condition which is necessary and sufficient for "most" G-actions. This is joint work with F. Kutzschebauch and F. Larusson.
A fibered density property and the automorphism group of the spectral ball
12:10 Fri 15 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

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The spectral ball is defined as the set of complex n by n matrices whose eigenvalues are all less than 1 in absolute value. Its group of holomorphic automorphisms has been studied over many decades in several papers and a precise conjecture about its structure has been formulated. In dimension 2 this conjecture was recently disproved by Kosinski. We not only disprove the conjecture in all dimensions but also give the best possible description of the automorphism group. Namely we explain how the invariant theoretic quotient map divides the automorphism group of the spectral ball into a finite dimensional part of symmetries which lift from the quotient and an infinite dimensional part which leaves the fibration invariant. We prove a precise statement as to how hopelessly huge this latter part is. This is joint work with R. Andrist.
A fixed point theorem on noncompact manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide / Radboud University

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For an elliptic operator on a compact manifold acted on by a compact Lie group, the Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point formula expresses its equivariant index in terms of data on fixed point sets of group elements. This can for example be used to prove Weyl’s character formula. We extend the definition of the equivariant index to noncompact manifolds, and prove a generalisation of the Atiyah-Segal-Singer formula, for group elements with compact fixed point sets. In one example, this leads to a relation with characters of discrete series representations of semisimple Lie groups. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2016 :: TBA

TBA + Any items for group discussion
Expanding maps
12:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Andy Hammerlindl :: Monash University

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Consider a function from the circle to itself such that the derivative is greater than one at every point. Examples are maps of the form f(x) = mx for integers m > 1. In some sense, these are the only possible examples. This fact and the corresponding question for maps on higher dimensional manifolds was a major motivation for Gromov to develop pioneering results in the field of geometric group theory. In this talk, I'll give an overview of this and other results relating dynamical systems to the geometry of the manifolds on which they act and (time permitting) talk about my own work in the area.
Hot tube tau machine
15:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2016 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

Abstract: Microstructured optical fibres may be fabricated by first extruding molten material from a die to produce a macroscopic version of the final design, call a preform, and then stretching this to produce a fibre. In this talk I will demonstrate how to couple an existing model of the fluid flow during the extrusion stage to a basic model of the fluid temperature and present some preliminary conclusions. This work is still in progress and is being carried out in collaboration with Yvonne Stokes, Michael Chen and Jonathan Wylie. (+ Any items for group discussion)
Sard Theorem for the endpoint map in sub-Riemannian manifolds
12:10 Fri 29 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Alessandro Ottazzi :: University of New South Wales

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Sub-Riemannian geometries occur in several areas of pure and applied mathematics, including harmonic analysis, PDEs, control theory, metric geometry, geometric group theory, and neurobiology. We introduce sub-Riemannian manifolds and give some examples. Therefore we discuss some of the open problems, and in particular we focus on the Sard Theorem for the endpoint map, which is related to the study of length minimizers. Finally, we consider some recent results obtained in collaboration with E. Le Donne, R. Montgomery, P. Pansu and D. Vittone.
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
Time series analysis of paleo-climate proxies (a mathematical perspective)
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Thomas Stemler :: University of Western Australia

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In this talk I will present the work my colleagues from the School of Earth and Environment (UWA), the "trans disciplinary methods" group of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany, and I did to explain the dynamics of the Australian-South East Asian monsoon system during the last couple of thousand years. From a time series perspective paleo-climate proxy series are more or less the monsters moving under your bed that wake you up in the middle of the night. The data is clearly non-stationary, non-uniform sampled in time and the influence of stochastic forcing or the level of measurement noise are more or less unknown. Given these undesirable properties almost all traditional time series analysis methods fail. I will highlight two methods that allow us to draw useful conclusions from the data sets. The first one uses Gaussian kernel methods to reconstruct climate networks from multiple proxies. The coupling relationships in these networks change over time and therefore can be used to infer which areas of the monsoon system dominate the complex dynamics of the whole system. Secondly I will introduce the transformation cost time series method, which allows us to detect changes in the dynamics of a non-uniform sampled time series. Unlike the frequently used interpolation approach, our new method does not corrupt the data and therefore avoids biases in any subsequence analysis. While I will again focus on paleo-climate proxies, the method can be used in other applied areas, where regular sampling is not possible.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Algebraic structures associated to Brownian motion on Lie groups
13:10 Thu 16 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Steve Rosenberg :: University of Adelaide / Boston University

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In (1+1)-d TQFT, products and coproducts are associated to pairs of pants decompositions of Riemann surfaces. We consider a toy model in dimension (0+1) consisting of specific broken paths in a Lie group. The products and coproducts are constructed by a Brownian motion average of holonomy along these paths with respect to a connection on an auxiliary bundle. In the trivial case over the torus, we (seem to) recover the Hopf algebra structure on the symmetric algebra. In the general case, we (seem to) get deformations of this Hopf algebra. This is a preliminary report on joint work with Michael Murray and Raymond Vozzo.
Chern-Simons invariants of Seifert manifolds via Loop spaces
14:10 Tue 28 Jun, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Ryan Mickler :: Northeastern University

Over the past 30 years the Chern-Simons functional for connections on G-bundles over three-manfolds has lead to a deep understanding of the geometry of three-manfiolds, as well as knot invariants such as the Jones polynomial. Here we study this functional for three-manfolds that are topologically given as the total space of a principal circle bundle over a compact Riemann surface base, which are known as Seifert manifolds. We show that on such manifolds the Chern-Simons functional reduces to a particular gauge-theoretic functional on the 2d base, that describes a gauge theory of connections on an infinite dimensional bundle over this base with structure group given by the level-k affine central extension of the loop group LG. We show that this formulation gives a new understanding of results of Beasley-Witten on the computability of quantum Chern-Simons invariants of these manifolds as well as knot invariants for knots that wrap a single fiber of the circle bundle. A central tool in our analysis is the Caloron correspondence of Murray-Stevenson-Vozzo.
Twists over etale groupoids and twisted vector bundles
12:10 Fri 22 Jul, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Elizabeth Gillaspy :: University of Colorado, Boulder

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Given a twist over an etale groupoid, one can construct an associated C*-algebra which carries a good deal of geometric and physical meaning; for example, the K-theory group of this C*-algebra classifies D-brane charges in string theory. Twisted vector bundles, when they exist, give rise to particularly important elements in this K-theory group. In this talk, we will explain how to use the classifying space of the etale groupoid to construct twisted vector bundles, under some mild hypotheses on the twist and the classifying space. My hope is that this talk will be accessible to a broad audience; in particular, no prior familiarity with groupoids, their twists, or the associated C*-algebras will be assumed. This is joint work with Carla Farsi.
Energy quantisation for the Willmore functional
11:10 Fri 7 Oct, 2016 :: Ligertwood 314 Flinders Room :: Yann Bernard :: Monash University

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We prove a bubble-neck decomposition and an energy quantisation result for sequences of Willmore surfaces immersed into R^(m>=3) with uniformly bounded energy and non-degenerating conformal structure. We deduce the strong compactness (modulo the action of the Moebius group) of closed Willmore surfaces of a given genus below some energy threshold. This is joint-work with Tristan Riviere (ETH Zuerich).
Character Formula for Discrete Series
12:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

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Weyl character formula describes characters of irreducible representations of compact Lie groups. This formula can be obtained using geometric method, for example, from the Atiyah-Bott fixed point theorem or the Atiyah-Segal-Singer index theorem. Harish-Chandra character formula, the noncompact analogue of the Weyl character formula, can also be studied from the point of view of index theory. We apply orbital integrals on K-theory of Harish-Chandra Schwartz algebra of a semisimple Lie group G, and then use geometric method to deduce Harish-Chandra character formulas for discrete series representations of G. This is work in progress with Peter Hochs.
Parahoric bundles, invariant theory and the Kazhdan-Lusztig map
12:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

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In this talk I will introduce the notion of parahoric groups, a loop group analogue of parabolic subgroups. I will also discuss a global version of this, namely parahoric bundles on a complex curve. This leads us to a problem concerning the behaviour of invariant polynomials on the dual of the Lie algebra, a kind of "parahoric invariant theory". The key to solving this problem turns out to be the Kazhdan-Lusztig map, which assigns to each nilpotent orbit in a semisimple Lie algebra a conjugacy class in the Weyl group. Based on joint work with Masoud Kamgarpour and Rohith Varma.
An equivariant parametric Oka principle for bundles of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 3 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will report on new joint work with Frank Kutzschebauch and Gerald Schwarz (arXiv:1612.07372). Under certain conditions, every continuous section of a holomorphic fibre bundle can be deformed to a holomorphic section. In fact, the inclusion of the space of holomorphic sections into the space of continuous sections is a weak homotopy equivalence. What if a complex Lie group acts on the bundle and its sections? We have proved an analogous result for equivariant sections. The result has a wide scope. If time permits, I will describe some interesting special cases and mention two applications.
K-types of tempered representations
12:10 Fri 7 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of a reductive Lie group G are the irreducible unitary representations one needs in the Plancherel decomposition of L^2(G). They are relevant to harmonic analysis because of this, and also occur in the Langlands classification of the larger class of admissible representations. If K in G is a maximal compact subgroup, then there is a considerable amount of information in the restriction of a tempered representation to K. In joint work with Yanli Song and Shilin Yu, we give a geometric expression for the decomposition of such a restriction into irreducibles. The multiplicities of these irreducibles are expressed as indices of Dirac operators on reduced spaces of a coadjoint orbit of G corresponding to the representation. These reduced spaces are Spin-c analogues of reduced spaces in symplectic geometry, defined in terms of moment maps that represent conserved quantities. This result involves a Spin-c version of the quantisation commutes with reduction principle for noncompact manifolds. For discrete series representations, this was done by Paradan in 2003.
Graded K-theory and C*-algebras
11:10 Fri 12 May, 2017 :: Engineering North 218 :: Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

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C*-algebras can be regarded, in a very natural way, as noncommutative algebras of continuous functions on topological spaces. The analogy is strong enough that topological K-theory in terms of formal differences of vector bundles has a direct analogue for C*-algebras. There is by now a substantial array of tools out there for computing C*-algebraic K-theory. However, when we want to model physical phenomena, like topological phases of matter, we need to take into account various physical symmetries, some of which are encoded by gradings of C*-algebras by the two-element group. Even the definition of graded C*-algebraic K-theory is not entirely settled, and there are relatively few computational tools out there. I will try to outline what a C*-algebra (and a graded C*-algebra is), indicate what graded K-theory ought to look like, and discuss recent work with Alex Kumjian and David Pask linking this with the deep and powerful work of Kasparov, and using this to develop computational tools.
Constructing differential string structures
14:10 Wed 7 Jun, 2017 :: EM213 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

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String structures on a manifold are analogous to spin structures, except instead of lifting the structure group through the extension Spin(n)\to SO(n) of Lie groups, we need to lift through the extension String(n)\to Spin(n) of Lie *2-groups*. Such a thing exists if the first fractional Pontryagin class (1/2)p_1 vanishes in cohomology. A differential string structure also lifts connection data, but this is rather complicated, involving a number of locally defined differential forms satisfying cocycle-like conditions. This is an expansion of the geometric string structures of Stolz and Redden, which is, for a given connection A, merely a 3-form R on the frame bundle such that dR = tr(F^2) for F the curvature of A; in other words a trivialisation of the de Rham class of (1/2)p_1. I will present work in progress on a framework (and specific results) that allows explicit calculation of the differential string structure for a large class of homogeneous spaces, which also yields formulas for the Stolz-Redden form. I will comment on the application to verifying the refined Stolz conjecture for our particular class of homogeneous spaces. Joint work with Ray Vozzo.
Compact pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 18 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

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A pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous space $M$ of finite volume can be presented as $M=G/H$, where $G$ is a Lie group acting transitively and isometrically on $M$, and $H$ is a closed subgroup of $G$. The condition that $G$ acts isometrically and thus preserves a finite measure on $M$ leads to strong algebraic restrictions on $G$. In the special case where $G$ has no compact semisimple normal subgroups, it turns out that the isotropy subgroup $H$ is a lattice, and that the metric on $M$ comes from a bi-invariant metric on $G$. This result allows us to recover Zeghib’s classification of Lorentzian compact homogeneous spaces, and to move towards a classification for metric index 2. As an application we can investigate which pseudo-Riemannian homogeneous spaces of finite volume are Einstein spaces. Through the existence questions for lattice subgroups, this leads to an interesting connection with the theory of transcendental numbers, which allows us to characterize the Einstein cases in low dimensions. This talk is based on joint works with Oliver Baues, Yuri Nikolayevsky and Abdelghani Zeghib.
An action of the Grothendieck-Teichmuller group on stable curves of genus zero
11:10 Fri 22 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Marcy Robertson :: University of Melbourne

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In this talk, we show that the group of homotopy automorphisms of the profinite completion of the framed little 2-discs operad is isomorphic to the (profinite) Grothendieck-Teichmuller group. We deduce that the Grothendieck-Teichmuller group acts nontrivially on an operadic model of the genus zero Teichmuller tower. This talk will be aimed at a general audience and will not assume previous knowledge of the Grothendieck-Teichmuller group or operads. This is joint work with Pedro Boavida and Geoffroy Horel.
Equivariant formality of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 29 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Alex Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

Equivariant formality, a notion in equivariant topology introduced by Goresky-Kottwitz-Macpherson, is a desirable property of spaces with group actions, which allows the application of localisation formula to evaluate integrals of any top closed forms and enables one to compute easily the equivariant cohomology. Broad classes of spaces of especial interest are well-known to be equivariantly formal, e.g., compact symplectic manifolds equipped with Hamiltonian compact Lie group actions and projective varieties equipped with linear algebraic torus actions, of which flag varieties are examples. Less is known about compact homogeneous spaces G/K equipped with the isotropy action of K, which is not necessarily of maximal rank. In this talk we will review previous attempts of characterizing equivariant formality of G/K, and present our recent results on this problem using an analogue of equivariant formality in K-theory. Part of the work presented in this talk is joint with Jeffrey Carlson.
Springer correspondence for symmetric spaces
12:10 Fri 17 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Ting Xue :: University of Melbourne

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The Springer theory for reductive algebraic groups plays an important role in representation theory. It relates nilpotent orbits in the Lie algebra to irreducible representations of the Weyl group. We develop a Springer theory in the case of symmetric spaces using Fourier transform, which relates nilpotent orbits in this setting to irreducible representations of Hecke algebras of various Coxeter groups with specified parameters. This in turn gives rise to character sheaves on symmetric spaces, which we describe explicitly in the case of classical symmetric spaces. A key ingredient in the construction is the nearby cycle sheaves associated to the adjoint quotient map. The talk is based on joint work with Kari Vilonen and partly based on joint work with Misha Grinberg and Kari Vilonen.
A Hecke module structure on the KK-theory of arithmetic groups
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Bram Mesland :: University of Bonn

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Let $G$ be a locally compact group, $\Gamma$ a discrete subgroup and $C_{G}(\Gamma)$ the commensurator of $\Gamma$ in $G$. The cohomology of $\Gamma$ is a module over the Shimura Hecke ring of the pair $(\Gamma,C_G(\Gamma))$. This construction recovers the action of the Hecke operators on modular forms for $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$ as a particular case. In this talk I will discuss how the Shimura Hecke ring of a pair $(\Gamma, C_{G}(\Gamma))$ maps into the $KK$-ring associated to an arbitrary $\Gamma$-C*-algebra. From this we obtain a variety of $K$-theoretic Hecke modules. In the case of manifolds the Chern character provides a Hecke equivariant transformation into cohomology, which is an isomorphism in low dimensions. We discuss Hecke equivariant exact sequences arising from possibly noncommutative compactifications of $\Gamma$-spaces. Examples include the Borel-Serre and geodesic compactifications of the universal cover of an arithmetic manifold, and the totally disconnected boundary of the Bruhat-Tits tree of $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$. This is joint work with M.H. Sengun (Sheffield).
Complexity of 3-Manifolds
15:10 Fri 23 Mar, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: A/Prof Stephan Tillmann :: University of Sydney

In this talk, I will give a general introduction to complexity of 3-manifolds and explain the connections between combinatorics, algebra, geometry, and topology that arise in its study. The complexity of a 3-manifold is the minimum number of tetrahedra in a triangulation of the manifold. It was defined and first studied by Matveev in 1990. The complexity is generally difficult to compute, and various upper and lower bounds have been derived during the last decades using fundamental group, homology or hyperbolic volume. Effective bounds have only been found in joint work with Jaco, Rubinstein and, more recently, Spreer. Our bounds not only allowed us to determine the first infinite classes of minimal triangulations of closed 3-manifolds, but they also lead to a structure theory of minimal triangulations of 3-manifolds.
Chaos in higher-dimensional complex dynamics
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

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I will report on new joint work with Leandro Arosio (University of Rome, Tor Vergata). Complex manifolds can be thought of as laid out across a spectrum characterised by rigidity at one end and flexibility at the other. On the rigid side, Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifolds have at most a finite-dimensional group of symmetries. On the flexible side, there are manifolds with an extremely large group of holomorphic automorphisms, the prototypes being the affine spaces $\mathbb C^n$ for $n \geq 2$. From a dynamical point of view, hyperbolicity does not permit chaos. An endomorphism of a Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifold is non-expansive with respect to the Kobayashi distance, so every family of endomorphisms is equicontinuous. We show that not only does flexibility allow chaos: under a strong anti-hyperbolicity assumption, chaotic automorphisms are generic. A special case of our main result is that if $G$ is a connected complex linear algebraic group of dimension at least 2, not semisimple, then chaotic automorphisms are generic among all holomorphic automorphisms of $G$ that preserve a left- or right-invariant Haar form. For $G=\mathbb C^n$, this result was proved (although not explicitly stated) some 20 years ago by Fornaess and Sibony. Our generalisation follows their approach. I will give plenty of context and background, as well as some details of the proof of the main result.
Index of Equivariant Callias-Type Operators
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hao Guo :: University of Adelaide

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Suppose M is a smooth Riemannian manifold on which a Lie group G acts properly and isometrically. In this talk I will explore properties of a particular class of G-invariant operators on M, called G-Callias-type operators. These are Dirac operators that have been given an additional Z_2-grading and a perturbation so as to be "invertible outside of a cocompact set in M". It turns out that G-Callias-type operators are equivariantly Fredholm and so have an index in the K-theory of the maximal group C*-algebra of G. This index can be expressed as a KK-product of a class in K-homology and a class in the K-theory of the Higson G-corona. In fact, one can show that the K-theory of the Higson G-corona is highly non-trivial, and thus the index theory of G-Callias-type operators is not obviously trivial. As an application of the index theory of G-Callias-type operators, I will mention an obstruction to the existence of G-invariant metrics of positive scalar curvature on M.
Braid groups and higher representation theory
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Tony Licata :: Australian National University

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The Artin braid group arise in a number of different parts of mathematics. The goal of this talk will be to explain how basic group-theoretic questions about the Artin braid group can be answered using some modern tools of linear and homological algebra, with an eye toward proving some open conjectures about other groups.
Obstructions to smooth group actions on 4-manifolds from families Seiberg-Witten theory
13:10 Fri 25 May, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

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Let X be a smooth, compact, oriented 4-manifold and consider the following problem. Let G be a group which acts on the second cohomology of X preserving the intersection form. Can this action of G on H^2(X) be lifted to an action of G on X by diffeomorphisms? We study a parametrised version of Seiberg-Witten theory for smooth families of 4-manifolds and obtain obstructions to the existence of such lifts. For example, we construct compact simply-connected 4-manifolds X and involutions on H^2(X) that can be realised by a continuous involution on X, or by a diffeomorphism, but not by an involutive diffeomorphism for any smooth structure on X.
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.
Exceptional quantum symmetries
11:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

I will survey our current understanding of "quantum symmetries", the mathematical models of topological order, in particular through the formalism of fusion categories. Our very limited classification results to date point to nearly all examples being built out of data coming from finite groups, quantum groups at roots of unity, and cohomological data. However, there are a small number of "exceptional" quantum symmetries that so far appear to be disconnected from the world of classical symmetries as studied in representation theory and group theory. I'll give an update on recent progress understanding these examples.
Twisted K-theory of compact Lie groups and extended Verlinde algebras
11:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

In a series of recent papers, Freed, Hopkins and Teleman put forth a deep result which identifies the twisted K -theory of a compact Lie group G with the representation theory of its loop group LG. Under suitable conditions, both objects can be enhanced to the Verlinde algebra, which appears in mathematical physics as the Frobenius algebra of a certain topological quantum field theory, and in algebraic geometry as the algebra encoding information of moduli spaces of G-bundles over Riemann surfaces. The Verlinde algebra for G with nice connectedness properties have been well-known. However, explicit descriptions of such for disconnected G are lacking. In this talk, I will discuss the various aspects of the Freed-Hopkins-Teleman Theorem and partial results on an extension of the Verlinde algebra arising from a disconnected G. The talk is based on work in progress joint with David Baraglia and Varghese Mathai.

News matching "Group meeting"

ARC success
The School of Mathematical Sciences was again very successful in attracting Australian Research Council funding for 2008. Recipients of ARC Discovery Projects are (with staff from the School highlighted):

Prof NG Bean; Prof PG Howlett; Prof CE Pearce; Prof SC Beecham; Dr AV Metcalfe; Dr JW Boland: WaterLog - A mathematical model to implement recommendations of The Wentworth Group.

2008-2010: $645,000

Prof RJ Elliott: Dynamic risk measures. (Australian Professorial Fellowship)

2008-2012: $897,000

Dr MD Finn: Topological Optimisation of Fluid Mixing.

2008-2010: $249,000

Prof PG Bouwknegt; Prof M Varghese; A/Prof S Wu: Dualities in String Theory and Conformal Field Theory in the context of the Geometric Langlands Program.

2008-2010: $240,000

The latter grant is held through the ANU Posted Wed 26 Sep 07.

Potts Medal Winner
Professor Charles Pearce, the Elder Profesor of Mathematics, was awarded the Ren Potts Medal by the Australian Society for Operations Research at its annual meeting in December. This is a national award for outstanding contributions to Operations Research in Australia. Posted Tue 22 Jan 08.
Sam Cohen wins prize for best student talk at ANZIAM 2009
Congratulations to Mr Sam Cohen, a PhD student within the School, who was awarded the T. M. Cherry Prize for the best student paper at the 2009 meeting of ANZIAM for his talk on A general theory of backward stochastic difference equations. Posted Fri 6 Feb 09.
Sam Cohen wins prize for best student talk at Aust MS 2009
Congratulations to Mr Sam Cohen, a PhD student within the School, who was awarded the B. H. Neumann Prize for the best student paper at the 2009 meeting of the Australian Mathematical Society for his talk on Dynamic Risk Measures and Nonlinear Expectations with Markov Chain noise. Posted Tue 6 Oct 09.
Group of Eight review
The Go8 Review of Mathematics and Quantitative Disciplines has been released and is now available on the Go8 website. Posted Sat 20 Mar 10.

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Inaugural winner of the Alf van der Poorten Travelling Fellowship
Congratulations to Dr Ray Vozzo who has been awarded the inaugural Alf van der Poorten Travelling Fellowship from the Australian Mathematical Society. Ray will use the fellowship to attend a meeting in Potsdam and visit colleagues in the United Kingdom. Posted Wed 20 Jul 11.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
(5–9 September 2011) Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage Posted Wed 27 Jul 11.

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Inaugural Adelaide R Users Group
The aim of the Adelaide R-users group is to meet, discuss R, and share our experiences of R. It also hopes to be an opportunity for new users to get a helping hand up the first part of the steep learning curve or at least learn how to fit a line to the steep learning curve. Posted Tue 18 Oct 11.

More information...

Publications matching "Group meeting"

Publications
T-duality as a duality of loop group bundles
Bouwknegt, Pier; Varghese, Mathai, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 42 (162001-1–162001-8) 2009
The inner automorphism 3-group of a strict 2-group
Roberts, David; Schreiber, U, Journal of Homotopy and Related Structures 3 (193–245) 2008
The Heisenberg Group, SL (3, R) , and Rigidity
Cap, A; Cowling, M; De Mari, F; Eastwood, Michael; McCallum, R, chapter in Harmonic Analysis, Group Representations, Automorphic Forms And Invariant Theory (World Scientific Publishing) 41–52, 2007
On mysteriously missing T-duals, H-flux and the T-duality Group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, chapter in Differential geometry and physics (World Scientific Publishing) 350–358, 2006
Heat kernels and the range of the trace on completions of twisted group algebras
Varghese, Mathai, Contemporary Mathematics 398 (321–345) 2006
T-duality for torus bundles with H-fluxes via noncommutative topology, II: the high-dimensional case and the T-duality group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (123–158) 2006
Characters of the discrete Heisenberg group and of its completion
Tandra, Haryono; Moran, W, Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 136 (525–539) 2004
Fast accurate computation of large-scale IP traffic matrices from link loads - group of 15 >
Zhang, Y; Roughan, Matthew; Duffield, N; Greenberg, A, Proceedings of the IEEE 90 (800–819) 2002
Yet another construction of the central extension of the loop group
Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, National Research Symposium on Geometric Analysis & Applications, AUSTRALIA 26/06/00
Hilbert C*-systems for actions of the circle group
Baumgaertel, H; Carey, Alan, Reports on Mathematical Physics 47 (349–361) 2001
Reporting of clinical trials using group sequential methods
Moran, John; Peake, Sandra; Solomon, Patricia, Critical care and Resuscitation 3 (146–147) 2001
An open-channel flow meeting a barrier and forming one or two jets
Wiryanto, Leonardus; Tuck, Ernest, The ANZIAM Journal 41 (458–472) 2000
Quantum group actions on the Cuntz algebra
Carey, Alan; Paolucci, A; Zhang, R, Annales Henri Poincare 1 (1097–1122) 2000

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