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Associate Professor Sanjeeva Balasuriya
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor Benjamin Binder
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Professor Tony Roberts
Professor of Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "Geophysical flows"

Water waves and free-surface flows

Surface water waves occur in many physical situations that are familiar to most people. They include waves on the surface of an ocean, tsunamis, and waves generated by shipping vessels. The interface or boundary between the water and air is called the free-surface. During this course, students will encounter a variety of mathematical methods used to determine the shape of the free-surface, for linear and nonlinear water wave problems. This will enable us to study the fundamental properties of water wave propagation.

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Events matching "Geophysical flows"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
A mathematical look at dripping honey
15:10 Fri 4 May, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

Honey dripping from an upturned spoon is an everyday example of a flow that extends and breaks up into drops. Such flows have been of interest for over 300 years, attracting the attention of Plateau and Rayleigh among others. Theoretical understanding has, however, lagged behind experimental investigation, with major progress being made only in the last two decades, driven by industrial applications including ink-jet printing, spinning of polymer and glass fibres, blow-moulding of containers, light bulbs and glass tubing, and rheological measurement by fibre extension. Albeit, the exact details of the final stages of breakup are yet to be fully resolved. An aspect that is relatively unexplored is the evolution of drop and filament from some initial configuration, and the influence of initial conditions on the final breakup. We will consider a drop of very viscous fluid hanging beneath a solid boundary, similar to honey dripping from an upturned spoon, using methods that allow examination of development and behaviour from early time, when a drop and filament begin to form, out to large times when the bulk of the fluid forms a drop at the bottom of a long thin filament which connects it with the upper boundary. The roles of gravity, inertia and surface tension will be examined.
Similarity solutions for surface-tension driven flows
15:10 Fri 14 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof John Lister :: Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK

The breakup of a mass of fluid into drops is a ubiquitous phenomenon in daily life, the natural environment and technology, with common examples including a dripping tap, ocean spray and ink-jet printing. It is a feature of many generic industrial processes such as spraying, emulsification, aeration, mixing and atomisation, and is an undesirable feature in coating and fibre spinning. Surface-tension driven pinch-off and the subsequent recoil are examples of finite-time singularities in which the interfacial curvature becomes infinite at the point of disconnection. As a result, the flow near the point of disconnection becomes self-similar and independent of initial and far-field conditions. Similarity solutions will be presented for the cases of inviscid and very viscous flow, along with comparison to experiments. In each case, a boundary-integral representation can be used both to examine the time-dependent behaviour and as the basis of a modified Newton scheme for direct solution of the similarity equations.
Elliptic equation for diffusion-advection flows
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Pavel Bedrikovsetsky :: Australian School of Petroleum Science, University of Adelaide.

The standard diffusion equation is obtained by Einstein's method and its generalisation, Fokker-Plank-Kolmogorov-Feller theory. The time between jumps in Einstein derivation is constant.

We discuss random walks with residence time distribution, which occurs for flows of solutes and suspensions/colloids in porous media, CO2 sequestration in coal mines, several processes in chemical, petroleum and environmental engineering. The rigorous application of the Einstein's method results in new equation, containing the time and the mixed dispersion terms expressing the dispersion of the particle time steps.

Usually, adding the second time derivative results in additional initial data. For the equation derived, the condition of limited solution when time tends to infinity provides with uniqueness of the Caushy problem solution.

The solution of the pulse injection problem describing a common tracer injection experiment is studied in greater detail. The new theory predicts delay of the maximum of the tracer, compared to the velocity of the flow, while its forward "tail" contains much more particles than in the solution of the classical parabolic (advection-dispersion) equation. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and predictions of the direct simulation.

Free surface Stokes flows with surface tension
15:10 Fri 5 Sep, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Darren Crowdy :: Imperial College London

In this talk, we will survey a number of different free boundary problems involving slow viscous (Stokes) flows in which surface tension is active on the free boundary. Both steady and unsteady flows will be considered. Motivating applications range from industrial processes such as viscous sintering (where end-products are formed as a result of the surface-tension-driven densification of a compact of smaller particles that are heated in order that they coalesce) to biological phenomena such as understanding how organisms swim (i.e. propel themselves) at low Reynolds numbers. Common to our approach to all these problems will be an analytical/theoretical treatment of model problems via complex variable methods -- techniques well-known at infinite Reynolds numbers but used much less often in the Stokes regime. These model problems can give helpful insights into the behaviour of the true physical systems.
Understanding optimal linear transient growth in complex-geometry flows
15:00 Fri 27 Mar, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Associate Prof Hugh Blackburn :: Monash University

Wall turbulence: from the laboratory to the atmosphere
15:00 Fri 29 May, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Ivan Marusic :: The University of Melbourne

The study of wall-bounded turbulent flows has received great attention over the past few years as a result of high Reynolds number experiments conducted in new high Reynolds number facilities such as the Princeton "superpipe", the NDF facility in Chicago and the HRNBLWT at the University of Melbourne. These experiments have brought into question the fundamental scaling laws of the turbulence and mean flow quantities as well as revealed high Reynolds number phenomena, which make extrapolation of low Reynolds number results highly questionable. In this talk these issues will be reviewed and new results from the HRNBLWT and atmospheric surface layer on the salt-flats of Utah will be presented documenting unique high Reynolds number phenomena. The implications for skin-friction drag reduction technologies and improved near-wall models for large-eddy simulation will be discussed.
Predicting turbulence
12:10 Wed 12 Aug, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

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Turbulence is characterised by three-dimensional unsteady fluid motion over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. It is important in many problems of technological and scientific interest, such as drag reduction, energy production and climate prediction. In this talk, I will explain why turbulent flows are difficult to predict and describe a modern mathematical model of turbulence based on a random collection of fluid vortices.
Modelling fluid-structure interactions in micro-devices
15:00 Thu 3 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The flows generated in many modern micro-devices possess very little convective inertia, however, they can be highly unsteady and exert substantial hydrodynamic forces on the device components. Typically these components exhibit some degree of compliance, which traditionally has been treated using simple one-dimensional elastic beam models. However, recent findings have suggested that three-dimensional effects can be important and, accordingly, we consider the elastohydrodynamic response of a rapidly oscillating three-dimensional elastic plate that is immersed in a viscous fluid. In addition, a preliminary model will be presented which incorporates the presence of a nearby elastic wall.
Curved pipe flow and its stability
15:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2009 :: Badger labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The unsteady flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe is a widely occuring and well studied problem. The stability of such flows, however, has largely been overlooked; this is in marked contrast to flow through a straight-pipe, examination of which forms a cornerstone of hydrodynamic stability theory. Importantly, however, flow through a curved pipe exhibits an array of flow structures that are simply not present in the zero curvature limit, and it is natural to expect these to substantially impact upon the flow's stability. By considering two very different kinds of flows through a curved pipe, we illustrate that this can indeed be the case.
The Jeffery–Hamel similarity solution and its relation to flow in a diverging channel
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Phil Haines :: University of Adelaide

Jeffery–Hamel flows describe the steady two-dimensional flow of an incompressible viscous fluid between plane walls separated by an angle $\alpha$. They are often used to approximate the flow in domains of finite radial extent. However, whilst the base Jeffery–Hamel solution is characterised by a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation, studies in expanding channels of finite length typically find symmetry breaking via a supercritical bifurcation.

We use the finite element method to calculate solutions for flow in a two-dimensional wedge of finite length bounded by arcs of constant radii, $R_1$ and $R_2$. We present a comprehensive picture of the bifurcation structure and nonlinear states for a net radial outflow of fluid. We find a series of nested neutral curves in the Reynolds number-$\alpha$ plane corresponding to pitchfork bifurcations that break the midplane symmetry of the flow. We show that these finite domain bifurcations remain distinct from the similarity solution bifurcation even in the limit $R_2/R_1 \rightarrow \infty$.

We also discuss a class of stable steady solutions apparently related to a steady, spatially periodic, wave first observed by Tutty (1996). These solutions remain disconnected in our domain in the sense that they do not arise via a local bifurcation of the Stokes flow solution as the Reynolds number is increased.

Understanding convergence of meshless methods: Vortex methods and smoothed particle hydrodynamics
15:10 Fri 14 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Lou Rossi :: University of Delaware

Meshless methods such as vortex methods (VMs) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes offer many advantages in fluid flow computations. Particle-based computations naturally adapt to complex flow geometries and so provide a high degree of computational efficiency. Also, particle based methods avoid CFL conditions because flow quantities are integrated along characteristics. There are many approaches to improving numerical methods, but one of the most effective routes is quantifying the error through the direct estimate of residual quantities. Understanding the residual for particle schemes requires a different approach than for meshless schemes but the rewards are significant. In this seminar, I will outline a general approach to understanding convergence that has been effective in creating high spatial accuracy vortex methods, and then I will discuss some recent investigations in the accuracy of diffusion operators used in SPH computations. Finally, I will provide some sample Navier-Stokes computations of high Reynolds number flows using BlobFlow, an open source implementation of the high precision vortex method.
Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
Explicit numerical simulation of multiphase and confined flows
15:10 Fri 8 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Mark Biggs :: University of Adelaide

Simulations in which the system of interest is essentially mimicked are termed explicit numerical simulations (ENS). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence is a well known and long-standing example of ENS. Such simulations provide a basis for elucidating fundamentals in a way that is impossible experimentally and formulating and parameterizing engineering models with reduced experimentation. In this presentation, I will first outline the concept of ENS. I will then report a number of ENS-based studies of various multiphase fluid systems and flows in porous media. In the first of these studies, which is concerned with flow of suspensions in porous media accompanied by deposition, ENS is used to demonstrate the significant inadequacies of the classical trajectory models typically used for the study of such problems. In the second study, which is concerned with elucidating the change in binary droplet collision behaviour with Capillary number (Ca) and Reynolds number (Re), a range of collision scenarios are revealed as a function of Ca and Re and it appears that the boundaries between these scenarios in the Ca-Re space are not distinct but, rather, smeared. In the final study, it is shown that ENS an be used to predict ab initio the hydrodynamic properties of single phase flow through porous media from the Darcy to the turbulent regimes.
Slippery issues in nano- and microscale fluid flows
11:10 Tue 30 Nov, 2010 :: Innova teaching suite B21 :: Dr Shaun C. Hendy :: Victoria University of Wellington

The no-slip boundary condition was considered to have been experimentally established for the flow of simple liquids over solid surfaces in the early 20th century. Nonetheless the refinement of a number of measurement techniques has recently led to the observation of nano- and microscale violations of the no-slip boundary condition by simple fluids flowing over non-wetting surfaces. However it is important to distinguish between intrinsic slip, which arises solely from the chemical interaction between the liquid and a homogeneous, atomically flat surface and effective slip, typically measured in macroscopic experiments, which emerges from the interaction of microscopic chemical heterogeneity, roughness and contaminants. Here we consider the role of both intrinsic and effective slip boundary conditions in nanoscale and microscale fluid flows using a theoretical approach, complemented by molecular dynamics simulations, and experimental evidence where available. Firstly, we consider nanoscale flows in small capillaries, including carbon nanotubes, where we have developed and solved a generalised Lucas-Washburn equation that incorporates slip to describe the uptake of droplets. We then consider the general problem of relating effective slip to microscopic intrinsic slip and roughness, and discuss several cases where we have been able to solve this problem analytically. Finally, we look at applications of these results to carbon nanotube growth, self-cleaning surfaces, catalysis, and putting insulation in your roof.
Heat transfer scaling and emergence of three-dimensional flow in horizontal convection
15:10 Fri 25 Feb, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Greg Sheard :: Monash University

Horizontal convecton refers to flows driven by uneven heating on a horizontal forcing boundary. Flows exhibiting these characteristics are prevalent in nature, and include the North-South Hadley circulation within the atmosphere between warmer and more temperate latitudes, as well as ocean currents driven by non-uniform heating via solar radiation.

Here a model for these generic convection flows is established featuring a rectangular enclosure, insulated on the side and top walls, and driven by a linear temperature gradient applied along the bottom wall. Rayleigh number dependence of heat transfer through the forcing boundary is computed and compared with theory. Attention is given to transitions in the flow, including the development of unsteady flow and three-dimensional flow: the effect of these transitions on the Nusselt-Rayleigh number scaling exponents is described.

Priority queueing systems with random switchover times and generalisations of the Kendall-Takacs equation
16:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

In this talk I will review existing analytical results for priority queueing systems with Poisson incoming flows, general service times and a single server which needs some (random) time to switch between requests of different priority. Specifically, I will discuss analytical results for the busy period and workload of such systems with a special structure of switchover times. The results related to the busy period can be seen as generalisations of the famous Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs functional equation for $M|G|1$: being formulated in terms of Laplace-Stieltjes transform, they represent systems of functional recurrent equations. I will present a methodology and algorithms of their numerical solution; the efficiency of these algorithms is achieved by acceleration of the numerical procedure of solving the classical Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs equation. At the end I will identify open problems with regard to such systems; these open problems are mainly related to the modelling of switchover times.
Horocycle flows at prime times
13:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

The distribution of individual orbits of unipotent flows in homogeneous spaces are well understood thanks to the work work of Marina Ratner. It is conjectured that this property is preserved on restricting the times from the integers to primes, this being important in the study of prime numbers as well as in such dynamics. We review progress in understanding this conjecture, starting with Dirichlet (a finite system), Vinogradov (rotation of a circle or torus), Green and Tao (translation on a nilmanifold) and Ubis and Sarnak (horocycle flows in the semisimple case).
Boundaries of unsteady Lagrangian Coherent Structures
15:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: Connecticut College, USA and the University of Adelaide

For steady flows, the boundaries of Lagrangian Coherent Structures are segments of manifolds connected to fixed points. In the general unsteady situation, these boundaries are time-varying manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories. Locating these boundaries, and attempting to meaningfully quantify fluid flux across them, is difficult since they are moving with time. This talk uses a newly developed tangential movement theory to locate these boundaries in nearly-steady compressible flows.
Stability analysis of nonparallel unsteady flows via separation of variables
15:30 Fri 18 Nov, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Georgy Burde :: Ben-Gurion University

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The problem of variables separation in the linear stability equations, which govern the disturbance behavior in viscous incompressible fluid flows, is discussed. Stability of some unsteady nonparallel three-dimensional flows (exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations) is studied via separation of variables using a semi-analytical, semi-numerical approach. In this approach, a solution with separated variables is defined in a new coordinate system which is sought together with the solution form. As the result, the linear stability problems are reduced to eigenvalue problems for ordinary differential equations which can be solved numerically. In some specific cases, the eigenvalue problems can be solved analytically. Those unique examples of exact (explicit) solution of the nonparallel unsteady flow stability problems provide a very useful test for methods used in the hydrodynamic stability theory. Exact solutions of the stability problems for some stagnation-type flows are presented.
Fluid flows in microstructured optical fibre fabrication
15:10 Fri 25 Nov, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

Optical fibres are used extensively in modern telecommunications as they allow the transmission of information at high speeds. Microstructured optical fibres are a relatively new fibre design in which a waveguide for light is created by a series of air channels running along the length of the material. The flexibility of this design allows optical fibres to be created with adaptable (and previously unrealised) optical properties. However, the fluid flows that arise during fabrication can greatly distort the geometry, which can reduce the effectiveness of a fibre or render it useless. I will present an overview of the manufacturing process and highlight the difficulties. I will then focus on surface-tension driven deformation of the macroscopic version of the fibre extruded from a reservoir of molten glass, occurring during fabrication, which will be treated as a two-dimensional Stokes flow problem. I will outline two different complex-variable numerical techniques for solving this problem along with comparisons of the results, both to other models and to experimental data.
Fast-track study of viscous flow over topography using 'Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics'
12:10 Mon 16 Apr, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

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Motivated by certain tea room discussions, I am going to (attempt to) model the flow of a viscous fluid under gravity over conical topography. The method used is 'Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics' (SPH), which is an easy-to-use but perhaps limited-accuracy computational method. The model could be extended to include solidification and thermodynamic effects that can also be implemented within the framework of SPH, and this has the obvious practical application to the modelling of the coverage of ice cream with ice magic, I mean, lava flows. If I fail to achieve this within the next 4 weeks, I will have to go through a talk on SPH that I gave during honours instead.
Spatial-point data sets and the Polya distribution
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Benjamin Binder :: The University of Adelaide

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Spatial-point data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems and mathematical models, can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in equally sized bins. We find that the bin counts are related to the Polya distribution. New indexes are developed which quantify whether or not a spatial data set is at its most evenly distributed state. Using three case studies (Lagrangian fluid particles in chaotic laminar flows, cellular automata agents in discrete models, and biological cells within colonies), we calculate the indexes and predict the spatial-state of the system.
Turbulent flows, semtex, and rainbows
12:10 Mon 8 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Sophie Calabretto :: University of Adelaide

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The analysis of turbulence in transient flows has applications across a broad range of fields. We use the flow of fluid in a toroidal container as a paradigm for studying the complex dynamics due to this turbulence. To explore the dynamics of our system, we exploit the numerical capabilities of semtex; a quadrilateral spectral element DNS code. Rainbows result.
Complex analysis in low Reynolds number hydrodynamics
15:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Darren Crowdy :: Imperial College London

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It is a well-known fact that the methods of complex analysis provide great advantage in studying physical problems involving a harmonic field satisfying Laplace's equation. One example is in ideal fluid mechanics (infinite Reynolds number) where the absence of viscosity, and the assumption of zero vorticity, mean that it is possible to introduce a so-called complex potential -- an analytic function from which all physical quantities of interest can be inferred. In the opposite limit of zero Reynolds number flows which are slow and viscous and the governing fields are not harmonic it is much less common to employ the methods of complex analysis even though they continue to be relevant in certain circumstances. This talk will give an overview of a variety of problems involving slow viscous Stokes flows where complex analysis can be usefully employed to gain theoretical insights. A number of example problems will be considered including the locomotion of low-Reynolds-number micro-organisms and micro-robots, the friction properties of superhydrophobic surfaces in microfluidics and problems of viscous sintering and the manufacture of microstructured optic fibres (MOFs).
Thin-film flow in helically-wound channels with small torsion
15:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

The study of flow in open helically-wound channels has application to many natural and industrial flows. We will consider laminar flow down helically-wound channels of rectangular cross section and with small torsion, in which the fluid depth is small. Assuming a steady-state flow that is independent of position along the axis of the channel, the flow solution may be determined in the two-dimensional cross section of the channel. A thin-film approximation yields explicit expressions for the fluid velocity in terms of the free-surface shape. The latter satisfies an interesting non-linear ordinary differential equation that, for a channel of rectangular cross section, has an analytical solution. The predictions of the thin-film model are shown to be in good agreement with much more computationally intensive solutions of the small-helix-torsion Navier-Stokes equations. This work has particular relevance to spiral particle separators used in the minerals processing industry. Early work on modelling of particle-laden thin-film flow in spiral channels will also be discussed.
Thin-film flow in helically-wound channels with small torsion
15:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

The study of flow in open helically-wound channels has application to many natural and industrial flows. We will consider laminar flow down helically-wound channels of rectangular cross section and with small torsion, in which the fluid depth is small. Assuming a steady-state flow that is independent of position along the axis of the channel, the flow solution may be determined in the two-dimensional cross section of the channel. A thin-film approximation yields explicit expressions for the fluid velocity in terms of the free-surface shape. The latter satisfies an interesting non-linear ordinary differential equation that, for a channel of rectangular cross section, has an analytical solution. The predictions of the thin-film model are shown to be in good agreement with much more computationally intensive solutions of the small-helix-torsion Navier-Stokes equations. This work has particular relevance to spiral particle separators used in the minerals processing industry. Early work on modelling of particle-laden thin-film flow in spiral channels will also be discussed.
Progress in the prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence
15:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Daniel Chung :: University of Melbourne

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Buoyancy-affected turbulence represents a significant challenge to our understanding, yet it dominates many important flows that occur in the ocean and atmosphere. The presentation will highlight some recent progress in the characterisation, modelling and prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence using direct and large-eddy simulations, along with implications for the characterisation of mixing in the ocean and the low-cloud feedback in the atmosphere. Specifically, direct numerical simulation data of stratified turbulence will be employed to highlight the importance of boundaries in the characterisation of turbulent mixing in the ocean. Then, a subgrid-scale model that captures the anisotropic character of stratified mixing will be developed for large-eddy simulation of buoyancy-affected turbulence. Finally, the subgrid-scale model is utilised to perform a systematic large-eddy simulation investigation of the archetypal low-cloud regimes, from which the link between the lower-tropospheric stability criterion and the cloud fraction interpreted.
A gentle introduction to bubble evolution in Hele-Shaw flows
15:10 Fri 22 Nov, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Scott McCue :: QUT

A Hele-Shaw cell is easy to make and serves as a fun toy for an applied mathematician to play with. If we inject air into a Hele-Shaw cell that is otherwise filled with viscous fluid, we can observe a bubble of air growing in size. The process is highly unstable, and the bubble boundary expands in an uneven fashion, leading to striking fingering patterns (look up Hele-Shaw cell or Saffman-Taylor instability on YouTube). From a mathematical perspective, modelling these Hele-Shaw flows is interesting because the governing equations are sufficiently ``simple'' that a considerable amount of analytical progress is possible. Indeed, there is no other context in which (genuinely) two-dimensional moving boundary problems are so tractable. More generally, Hele-Shaw flows are important as they serve as prototypes for more complicated (and important) physical processes such as crystal growth and diffusion limited aggregation. I will give an introduction to some of the main ideas and summarise some of my present research in this area.
Buoyancy driven exchange flows in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs
15:10 Mon 2 Dec, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Professor John Patterson :: University of Sydney

Natural convection is the flow driven by differences in density, and is ubiquitous in nature and industry. It is the source of most environmental flows, and is the basis for almost all industrial heat exchange processes. It operates on both massive and micro scales. It is usually considered as a flow driven by temperature gradients, but could equally be from a gradient in any density determining property - salinity is one obvious example. It also depends on gravity; so magnetohydrodynamics becomes relevant as well. One particular interesting and environmentally relevant flow is the exchange flow in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs. This occurs because of the effects of a decreasing depth approaching the shore resulting laterally unequal heat loss and heat gain during the diurnal cooling and heating cycle. This presentation will discuss some of the results obtained by the Natural Convection Group at Sydney University in analytical, numerical and experimental investigations of this mechanism, and the implications for lake water quality.
Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows
15:10 Fri 4 Apr, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: The University of Adelaide

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How does one define the boundary of the ozone hole, an oceanic eddy, or Jupiter's Great Red Spot? These occur in flows which are unsteady (nonautonomous), that is, which change with time, and therefore any boundary must as well. In steady (autonomous) flows, defining flow boundaries is straightforward: one first finds fixed points of the flow, and then determines entities in space which are attracted to or repelled from these points as time progresses. These are respectively the stable and unstable manifolds of the fixed points, and can be shown to partition space into regions of different types of flow. This talk will focus on the required modifications to this idea for determining flow barriers in the more realistic unsteady context. An application to maximising mixing in microfluidic devices will also be presented.
Boundary behaviour of Hitchin and hypo flows with left-invariant initial data
12:10 Fri 27 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Vicente Cortes :: University of Hamburg

Hitchin and hypo flows constitute a system of first order pdes for the construction of Ricci-flat Riemannian mertrics of special holonomy in dimensions 6, 7 and 8. Assuming that the initial geometric structure is left-invariant, we study whether the resulting Ricci-flat manifolds can be extended in a natural way to complete Ricci-flat manifolds. This talk is based on joint work with Florin Belgun, Marco Freibert and Oliver Goertsches, see arXiv:1405.1866 (math.DG).
Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Active Suspensions
14:10 Mon 3 Aug, 2015 :: Napier 209 :: Professor Michael Shelley :: Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University

Complex fluids that have a 'bio-active' microstructure, like suspensions of swimming bacteria or assemblies of immersed biopolymers and motor-proteins, are important examples of so-called active matter. These internally driven fluids can have strange mechanical properties, and show persistent activity-driven flows and self-organization. I will show how first-principles PDE models are derived through reciprocal coupling of the 'active stresses' generated by collective microscopic activity to the fluid's macroscopic flows. These PDEs have an interesting analytic structures and dynamics that agree qualitatively with experimental observations: they predict the transitions to flow instability and persistent mixing observed in bacterial suspensions, and for microtubule assemblies show the generation, propagation, and annihilation of disclination defects. I'll discuss how these models might be used to study yet more complex biophysical systems.
Modelling Directionality in Stationary Geophysical Time Series
12:10 Mon 12 Oct, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Mohd Mahayaudin Mansor :: University of Adelaide

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Many time series show directionality inasmuch as plots again-st time and against time-to-go are qualitatively different, and there is a range of statistical tests to quantify this effect. There are two strategies for allowing for directionality in time series models. Linear models are reversible if and only if the noise terms are Gaussian, so one strategy is to use linear models with non-Gaussian noise. The alternative is to use non-linear models. We investigate how non-Gaussian noise affects directionality in a first order autoregressive process AR(1) and compare this with a threshold autoregressive model with two thresholds. The findings are used to suggest possible improvements to an AR(9) model, identified by an AIC criterion, for the average yearly sunspot numbers from 1700 to 1900. The improvement is defined in terms of one-step-ahead forecast errors from 1901 to 2014.
Some free boundary value problems in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows
12:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Valentina Wheeler :: University of Wollongong

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In this talk we present an overview of the current research in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows with free boundaries, with particular focus on our own results. Firstly we consider the scenario of a mean curvature flow solution with a ninety-degree angle condition on a fixed hypersurface in Euclidean space, that we call the contact hypersurface. We prove that under restrictions on either the initial hypersurface (such as rotational symmetry) or restrictions on the contact hypersurface the flow exists for all times and converges to a self-similar solution. We also discuss the possibility of a curvature singularity appearing on the free boundary contained in the contact hypersurface. We extend some of these results to the setting of a hypersurface evolving in its normal direction with speed given by a fully nonlinear functional of the principal curvatures.
Predicting turbulence
14:10 Tue 30 Aug, 2016 :: Napier 209 :: Dr Trent Mattner :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Turbulence is characterised by three-dimensional unsteady fluid motion over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. It is important in many problems of technological and scientific interest, such as drag reduction, energy production and climate prediction. Turbulent flows are governed by the Navier--Stokes equations, which are a nonlinear system of partial differential equations. Typically, numerical methods are needed to find solutions to these equations. In turbulent flows, however, the resulting computational problem is usually intractable. Filtering or averaging the Navier--Stokes equations mitigates the computational problem, but introduces new quantities into the equations. Mathematical models of turbulence are needed to estimate these quantities. One promising turbulence model consists of a random collection of fluid vortices, which are themselves approximate solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations.
Segregation of particles in incompressible flows due to streamline topology and particle-boundary interaction
15:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Professor Hendrik C. Kuhlmann :: Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria

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The incompressible flow in a number of classical benchmark problems (e.g. lid-driven cavity, liquid bridge) undergoes an instability from a two-dimensional steady to a periodic three-dimensional flow, which is steady or in form of a traveling wave, if the Reynolds number is increased. In the supercritical regime chaotic as well as regular (quasi-periodic) streamlines can coexist for a range of Reynolds numbers. The spatial structures of the regular regions in three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows has received relatively little attention, partly because of the high numerical effort required for resolving these structures. Particles whose density does not differ much from that of the liquid approximately follow the chaotic or regular streamlines in the bulk. Near the boundaries, however, their trajectories strongly deviate from the streamlines, in particular if the boundary (wall or free surface) is moving tangentially. As a result of this particle-boundary interaction particles can rapidly segregate and be attracted to periodic or quasi-periodic orbits, yielding particle accumulation structures (PAS). The mechanism of PAS will be explained and results from experiments and numerical modelling will be presented to demonstrate the generic character of the phenomenon.
Lagrangian transport in deterministic flows: from theory to experiment
16:10 Tue 16 May, 2017 :: Engineering North N132 :: Dr Michel Speetjens :: Eindhoven University of Technology

Transport of scalar quantities (e.g. chemical species, nutrients, heat) in deterministic flows is key to a wide range of phenomena and processes in industry and Nature. This encompasses length scales ranging from microns to hundreds of kilometres, and includes systems as diverse as viscous flows in the processing industry, micro-fluidic flows in labs-on-a-chip and porous media, large-scale geophysical and environmental flows, physiological and biological flows and even continuum descriptions of granular flows. Essential to the net transport of a scalar quantity is its advection by the fluid motion. The Lagrangian perspective (arguably) is the most natural way to investigate advection and leans on the fact that fluid trajectories are organized into coherent structures that geometrically determine the advective transport properties. Lagrangian transport is typically investigated via theoretical and computational studies and often concerns idealized flow situations that are difficult (or even impossible) to create in laboratory experiments. However, bridging the gap from theoretical and computational results to realistic flows is essential for their physical meaningfulness and practical relevance. This presentation highlights a number of fundamental Lagrangian transport phenomena and properties in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows and demonstrates their physical validity by way of representative and experimentally realizable flows.
Exact coherent structures in high speed flows
15:10 Fri 28 Jul, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Philip Hall :: Monash University

In recent years, there has been much interest in the relevance of nonlinear solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to fully turbulent flows. The solutions must be calculated numerically at moderate Reynolds numbers but in the limit of high Reynolds numbers asymptotic methods can be used to greatly simplify the computational task and to uncover the key physical processes sustaining the nonlinear states. In particular, in confined flows exact coherent structures defining the boundary between the laminar and turbulent attractors can be constructed. In addition, structures which capture the essential physical properties of fully turbulent flows can be found. The extension of the ideas to boundary layer flows and current work attempting to explain the law of the wall will be discussed.
Curvature contraction of axially symmetric hypersurfaces in the sphere
12:10 Fri 4 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: James McCoy :: University of Wollongong

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We show that convex surfaces in an ambient three-sphere contract to round points in finite time under fully nonlinear, degree one homogeneous curvature flows, with no concavity condition on the speed. The result extends to convex axially symmetric hypersurfaces of S^{n+1}. Using a different pinching function we also obtain the analogous results for contraction by Gauss curvature.
On the fundamental of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and interfacial mixing
15:10 Fri 15 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Snezhana Abarzhi :: University of Western Australia

Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) develops when fluids of different densities are accelerated against their density gradient. Extensive interfacial mixing of the fluids ensues with time. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing controls a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials, in high and low energy density regimes, at astrophysical and atomistic scales. Examples include formation of hot spot in inertial confinement, supernova explosion, stellar and planetary convection, flows in atmosphere and ocean, reactive and supercritical fluids, material transformation under impact and light-material interaction. In some of these cases (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) RT mixing should be tightly mitigated; in some others (e.g. turbulent combustion) it should be strongly enhanced. Understanding the fundamentals of RTI is crucial for achieving a better control of non-equilibrium processes in nature and technology. Traditionally, it was presumed that RTI leads to uncontrolled growth of small-scale imperfections, single-scale nonlinear dynamics, and extensive mixing that is similar to canonical turbulence. The recent success of the theory and experiments in fluids and plasmas suggests an alternative scenario of RTI evolution. It finds that the interface is necessary for RT mixing to accelerate, the acceleration effects are strong enough to suppress the development of turbulence, and the RT dynamics is multi-scale and has significant degree of order. This talk presents a physics-based consideration of fundamentals of RTI and RT mixing, and summarizes what is certain and what is not so certain in our knowledge of RTI. The focus question - How to influence the regularization process in RT mixing? We also discuss new opportunities for improvements of predictive modeling capabilities, physical description, and control of RT mixing in fluids, plasmas and materials.

News matching "Geophysical flows"

ARC Grant successes
Congratulations to Tony Roberts, Charles Pearce, Robert Elliot, Andrew Metcalfe and all their collaborators on their success in the current round of ARC grants. The projects are "Development of innovative technologies for oil production based on the advanced theory of suspension flows in porous media" (Tony Roberts et al.), "Perturbation and approximation methods for linear operators with applications to train control, water resource management and evolution of physical systems" (Charles Pearce et al.), "Risk Measures and Management in Finance and Actuarial Science Under Regime-Switching Models" (Robert Elliott et al.) and "A new flood design methodology for a variable and changing climate" (Andrew Metcalfe et al.) Posted Mon 26 Oct 09.
First Australian-New Zealand Rotating Flows Workshop
The first Australian-New Zealand Rotating Flow Workshop will be held from 9th to 11th of January 2012. The workshop, organised by the School of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Adelaide and the Department of Engineering Science at the University of Auckland, will bring together world leading researchers in the broad field of rotating flows. The workshop is sponsored by AMSI, the School of Mathematical Sciences, the University of Auckland and the Royal Society of New Zealand. Please visit the workshop website for further details. Posted Sat 24 Sep 11.

Publications matching "Geophysical flows"

Publications
Hitting probabilities and hitting times for stochastic fluid flows the bounded model
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, P, Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences 23 (121–147) 2009
On satisfying the radiation condition in free-surface flows
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J; Dias, F, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 624 (179–189) 2009
Topological chaos in flows on surfaces of arbitrary genus
Finn, Matthew; Thiffeault, J, XXII International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Adelaide 24/08/08
Algorithms for the Laplace-Stieltjes transforms of first return times for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability 10 (381–408) 2008
Influence of rapid changes in a channel bottom on free-surface flows
Binder, Benjamin; Dias, F; Vanden-Broeck, J, IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 73 (254–273) 2008
The effect of disturbances on the flows under a sluice gate and past an inclined plate
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 576 (475–490) 2007
The dynamics of the vertical structure of turbulence in flood flows
Georgiev, D; Roberts, Anthony John; Strunin, D, The ANZIAM Journal - On-line full-text 48 (C573–C590) 2007
Reduced models of chemical reaction in chaotic flows
Vikhansky, A; Cox, Stephen, Physics of Fluids 18 (37102–37102) 2006
An accurate and comprehensive model of thin fluid flows with inertia on curved substrates
Roberts, Anthony John; Li, Z, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 553 (33–73) 2006
A hydrodynamic model of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, The XXXI IAHR Congress, Seoul, Korea 11/09/05
A 3-D non-hydrostatic pressure model for small amplitude free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 50 (649–672) 2005
Algorithms for return probabilities for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Stochastic Models 21 (149–184) 2005
Applications of the artificial compressibility method for turbulent open channel flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 51 (617–633) 2005
Development of a 3D non-hydrostatic pressure model for free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, The ANZIAM Journal - On-line full-text 46 (623–636) 2005
Hitting probabilities and hitting times for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Stochastic Processes and their Applications 115 (1530–1556) 2005
Self-similar "stagnation point" boundary layer flows with suction or injection
King, J; Cox, Stephen, Studies in Applied Mathematics 115 (73–107) 2005
Free surface flows past surfboards and sluice gates
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J, European Journal of Applied Mathematics 16 (601–619) 2005
Relationships between the El-Nino southern oscillation and spate flows in southern Africa and Australia
Whiting, Julian; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew; Adamson, Peter; Franks, S; Kuczera, George, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 8 (1118–1128) 2004
Diffusive mass transfer and its effect upon boundary-layer flows
Halatchev, Iordan; Denier, James, Computational Fluid Dynamics 2002, Sydney, Australia 15/07/03
The stability of boundary-layer flows under conditions of intense interfacial mass transfer: the effect of interfacial coupling
Halatchev, Iordan; Denier, James, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 46 (3881–3895) 2003
A lubrication model of coating flows over a curved substrate in space
Roy, R; Roberts, Anthony John; Simpson, M, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 454 (235–261) 2002
Stochastic flows and the forward measure
Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, Finance and Stochastics 5 (511–525) 2001
Three-dimensional inviscid waves in buoyant boundary layer flows
Denier, James; Stott, Jillian; Bassom, A, Fluid Dynamics Research 28 (89–109) 2001
A GUI for computing flows past general airfoils
Simakov, Sergey; Dostovalova, Anna; Tuck, Ernest, The MATLAB User Conference 2000, Melbourne, Australia 09/11/00

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