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Dr Peter Hochs
Lecturer in Pure Mathematics, Marie Curie Fellowship


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Dr Danny Stevenson
Senior Lecturer


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Events matching "Geometric quantisation"

Mathematics of underground mining.
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Hyam Rubinstein

Underground mining infrastructure involves an interesting range of optimisation problems with geometric constraints. In particular, ramps, drives and tunnels have gradient within a certain prescribed range and turning circles (curvature) are also bounded. Finally obstacles have to be avoided, such as faults, ore bodies themselves and old workings. A group of mathematicians and engineers at Uni of Melb and Uni of SA have been working on this problem for a number of years. I will summarise what we have found and the challenges of working in the mining industry.
Geometric analysis on the noncommutative torus
13:10 Fri 20 Mar, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Jonathan Rosenberg :: University of Maryland

Noncommutative geometry (in the sense of Alain Connes) involves replacing a conventional space by a "space" in which the algebra of functions is noncommutative. The simplest truly non-trivial noncommutative manifold is the noncommutative 2-torus, whose algebra of functions is also called the irrational rotation algebra. I will discuss a number of recent results on geometric analysis on the noncommutative torus, including the study of nonlinear noncommutative elliptic PDEs (such as the noncommutative harmonic map equation) and noncommutative complex analysis (with noncommutative elliptic functions).
String structures and characteristic classes for loop group bundles
13:10 Fri 1 May, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Mr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Chern-Weil homomorphism gives a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundles. In infinite dimensions, however, the standard theory fails due to analytical problems. In this talk I shall give a geometric method for calculating characteristic classes for principal bundle with structure group the loop group of a compact group which side-steps these complications. This theory is inspired in some sense by results on the string class (a certain cohomology class on the base of a loop group bundle) which I shall outline.
Generalizations of the Stein-Tomas restriction theorem
13:10 Fri 7 Aug, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

The Stein-Tomas restriction theorem says that the Fourier transform of a function in L^p(R^n) restricts to an L^2 function on the unit sphere, for p in some range [1, 2(n+1)/(n+3)]. I will discuss geometric generalizations of this result, by interpreting it as a property of the spectral measure of the Laplace operator on R^n, and then generalizing to the Laplace-Beltrami operator on certain complete Riemannian manifolds. It turns out that dynamical properties of the geodesic flow play a crucial role in determining whether a restriction-type theorem holds for these manifolds.
From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
Stable commutator length
13:40 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Danny Calegari :: California Institute of Technology

Stable commutator length answers the question: "what is the simplest surface in a given space with prescribed boundary?" where "simplest" is interpreted in topological terms. This topological definition is complemented by several equivalent definitions - in group theory, as a measure of non-commutativity of a group; and in linear programming, as the solution of a certain linear optimization problem. On the topological side, scl is concerned with questions such as computing the genus of a knot, or finding the simplest 4-manifold that bounds a given 3-manifold. On the linear programming side, scl is measured in terms of certain functions called quasimorphisms, which arise from hyperbolic geometry (negative curvature) and symplectic geometry (causal structures). In these talks we will discuss how scl in free and surface groups is connected to such diverse phenomena as the existence of closed surface subgroups in graphs of groups, rigidity and discreteness of symplectic representations, bounding immersed curves on a surface by immersed subsurfaces, and the theory of multi- dimensional continued fractions and Klein polyhedra. Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory. He received a B.A. in 1994 from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley under the joint supervision of Andrew Casson and William Thurston. From 2000 to 2002 he was Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University, after which he joined the Caltech faculty; he became Richard Merkin Professor in 2007.
A Fourier-Mukai transform for invariant differential cohomology
13:10 Fri 9 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Mr Richard Green :: University of Adelaide

Fourier-Mukai transforms are a geometric analogue of integral transforms playing an important role in algebraic geometry. Their name derives from the construction of Mukai involving the Poincare line bundle associated to an abelian variety. In this talk I will discuss recent work looking at an analogue of this original Fourier-Mukai transform in the context of differential geometry, which gives an isomorphism between the invariant differential cohomology of a real torus and its dual.
Buildings
15:10 Fri 9 Oct, 2009 :: MacBeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Guyan Robertson :: University of Newcastle, UK

Buildings were created by J. Tits in order to give a systematic geometric interpretation of simple Lie groups (and of simple algebraic groups). Buildings have since found applications in many areas of mathematics. This talk will give an informal introduction to these beautiful objects.
Moduli spaces of stable holomorphic vector bundles II
13:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: A/Prof Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

In this talk, I shall briefly review the notion of stability for holomorphic vector bundles on compact complex manifolds as discussed in the first part of this talk (28 August 2009). Then I shall attempt to compute some explicit examples in simple situations, illustrating the use of basic algebraic-geometric tools. The level of the talk will be appropriate for graduate students, particularly those who have been taking part in the algebraic geometry reading group meetings.
Moduli spaces of stable holomorphic vector bundles III
13:10 Fri 14 May, 2010 :: School Board Room :: A/Prof Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

This talk is a continuation of the talk on 30 April. The same abstract applies: In this talk, I shall briefly review the notion of stability for holomorphic vector bundles on compact complex manifolds as discussed in the first part of this talk (28 August 2009). Then I shall attempt to compute some explicit examples in simple situations, illustrating the use of basic algebraic-geometric tools. The level of the talk will be appropriate for graduate students, particularly those who have been taking part in the algebraic geometry reading group meetings.
Compound and constrained regression analyses for EIV models
15:05 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wei Zhu :: State University of New York at Stony Brook

In linear regression analysis, randomness often exists in the independent variables and the resulting models are referred to errors-in-variables (EIV) models. The existing general EIV modeling framework, the structural model approach, is parametric and dependent on the usually unknown underlying distributions. In this work, we introduce a general non-parametric EIV modeling framework, the compound regression analysis, featuring an intuitive geometric representation and a 1-1 correspondence to the structural model. Properties, examples and further generalizations of this new modeling approach are discussed in this talk.
A polyhedral model for boron nitride nanotubes
15:10 Fri 3 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Dr Barry Cox :: University of Adelaide

The conventional rolled-up model of nanotubes does not apply to the very small radii tubes, for which curvature effects become significant. In this talk an existing geometric model for carbon nanotubes proposed by the authors, which accommodates this deficiency and which is based on the exact polyhedral cylindrical structure, is extended to a nanotube structure involving two species of atoms in equal proportion, and in particular boron nitride nanotubes. This generalisation allows the principle features to be included as the fundamental assumptions of the model, such as equal bond length but distinct bond angles and radii between the two species. The polyhedral model is based on the five simple geometric assumptions: (i) all bonds are of equal length, (ii) all bond angles for the boron atoms are equal, (iii) all boron atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, (iv) all nitrogen atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, and (v) there exists a fixed ratio of pyramidal height H, between the boron species compared with the corresponding height in a symmetric single species nanotube. Working from these postulates, expressions are derived for the various structural parameters such as radii and bond angles for the two species for specific values of the chiral vector numbers (n,m). The new model incorporates an additional constant of proportionality H, which we assume applies to all nanotubes comprising the same elements and is such that H = 1 for a single species nanotube. Comparison with `ab initio' studies suggest that this assumption is entirely reasonable, and in particular we determine the value H = 0.56\pm0.04 for boron nitride, based on computational results in the literature. This talk relates to work which is a couple of years old and given time at the end we will discuss some newer results in geometric models developed with our former student Richard Lee (now also at the University of Adelaide as a post doc) and some work-in-progress on carbon nanocones. Note: pyramidal height is our own terminology and will be explained in the talk.
Mathematical modelling in nanotechnology
15:10 Fri 4 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Jim Hill :: University of Adelaide

Media...
In this talk we present an overview of the mathematical modelling contributions of the Nanomechanics Groups at the Universities of Adelaide and Wollongong. Fullerenes and carbon nanotubes have unique properties, such as low weight, high strength, flexibility, high thermal conductivity and chemical stability, and they have many potential applications in nano-devices. In this talk we first present some new results on the geometric structure of carbon nanotubes and on related nanostructures. One concept that has attracted much attention is the creation of nano-oscillators, to produce frequencies in the gigahertz range, for applications such as ultra-fast optical filters and nano-antennae. The sliding of an inner shell inside an outer shell of a multi-walled carbon nanotube can generate oscillatory frequencies up to several gigahertz, and the shorter the inner tube the higher the frequency. A C60-nanotube oscillator generates high frequencies by oscillating a C60 fullerene inside a single-walled carbon nanotube. Here we discuss the underlying mechanisms of nano-oscillators and using the Lennard-Jones potential together with the continuum approach, to mathematically model the C60-nanotube nano-oscillator. Finally, three illustrative examples of recent modelling in hydrogen storage, nanomedicine and nanocomputing are discussed.
Spherical tube hypersurfaces
13:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Prof Alexander Isaev :: Australian National University

We consider smooth real hypersurfaces in a complex vector space. Specifically, we are interested in tube hypersurfaces, i.e., hypersurfaces represented as the direct product of the imaginary part of the space and hypersurfaces lying in its real part. Tube hypersurfaces arise, for instance, as the boundaries of tube domains. The study of tube domains is a classical subject in several complex variables and complex geometry, which goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. Indeed, already Siegel found it convenient to realise certain symmetric domains as tubes. One can endow a tube hypersurface with a so-called CR-structure, which is the remnant of the complex structure on the ambient vector space. We impose on the CR-structure the condition of sphericity. One way to state this condition is to require a certain curvature (called the CR-curvature of the hypersurface) to vanish identically. Spherical tube hypersurfaces possess remarkable properties and are of interest from both the complex-geometric and affine-geometric points of view. I my talk I will give an overview of the theory of such hypersurfaces. In particular, I will mention an algebraic construction arising from this theory that has applications in abstract commutative algebra and singularity theory. I will speak about these applications in detail in my colloquium talk later today.
Permeability of heterogeneous porous media - experiments, mathematics and computations
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2011 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Permeability is a key parameter important to a variety of applications in geological engineering and in the environmental geosciences. The conventional definition of Darcy flow enables the estimation of permeability at different levels of detail. This lecture will focus on the measurement of surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone, using a surface permeameter. The paper discusses the theoretical developments, the solution of the resulting triple integral equations and associated computational treatments that enable the mapping of the near surface permeability of the cuboidal region. This data combined with a kriging procedure is used to develop results for the permeability distribution at the interior of the cuboidal region. Upon verification of the absence of dominant pathways for fluid flow through the cuboidal region, estimates are obtained for the "Effective Permeability" of the cuboid using estimates proposed by Wiener, Landau and Lifschitz, King, Matheron, Journel et al., Dagan and others. The results of these estimates are compared with the geometric mean, derived form the computational estimates.
Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part I)
09:30 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part II)
10:50 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

The real thing
12:10 Wed 3 Aug, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Paul McCann :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Let x be a real number. This familiar and seemingly innocent assumption opens up a world of infinite variety and information. We use some simple techniques (powers of two, geometric series) to examine some interesting consequences of generating random real numbers, and encounter both the best flash drive and the worst flash drive you will ever meet. Come "hold infinity in the palm of your hand", and contemplate eternity for about half an hour. Almost nothing is assumed, almost everything is explained, and absolutely all are welcome.
Twisted Morava K-theory
13:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

Morava's extraordinary K-theories K(n) are a family of generalized cohomology theories which behave in some ways like K-theory (indeed, K(1) is mod 2 K-theory). Their construction exploits Quillen's description of cobordism in terms of formal group laws and Lubin-Tate's methods in class field theory for constructing abelian extensions of number fields. Constructed from homotopy-theoretic methods, they do not admit a geometric description (like deRham cohomology, K-theory, or cobordism), but are nonetheless subtle, computable invariants of topological spaces. In this talk, I will give an introduction to these theories, and explain how it is possible to define an analogue of twisted K-theory in this setting. Traditionally, K-theory is twisted by a three-dimensional cohomology class; in this case, K(n) admits twists by (n+2)-dimensional classes. This work is joint with Hisham Sati.
Configuration spaces in topology and geometry
15:10 Fri 9 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Craig Westerland :: University of Melbourne

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Configuration spaces of points in R^n give a family of interesting geometric objects. They and their variants have numerous applications in geometry, topology, representation theory, and number theory. In this talk, we will review several of these manifestations (for instance, as moduli spaces, function spaces, and the like), and use them to address certain conjectures in number theory regarding distributions of number fields.
T-duality via bundle gerbes I
13:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
T-duality via bundle gerbes II
13:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
Bundle gerbes and the Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly
13:10 Fri 30 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

The Faddeev-Mickelsson-Shatashvili anomaly arises in the quantisation of fermions interacting with external gauge potentials. Mathematically, it can be described as a certain lifting problem for an extension of groups. The theory of bundle gerbes is very useful for studying lifting problems, however it only applies in the case of a central extension whereas in the study of the FMS anomaly the relevant extension is non-central. In this talk I will explain how to describe this anomaly indirectly using bundle gerbes and how to use a generalisation of bundle gerbes to describe the (non-central) lifting problem directly. This is joint work with Pedram Hekmati, Michael Murray and Danny Stevenson.
The mechanics of plant root growth
15:10 Fri 30 Mar, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Rosemary Dyson :: University of Birmingham

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Growing plant cells undergo rapid axial elongation with negligible radial expansion: high internal turgor pressure causes viscous stretching of the cell wall. We represent the cell wall as a thin fibre-reinforced viscous sheet, providing insight into the geometric and biomechanical parameters underlying bulk quantities such as wall extensibility and showing how either dynamical changes in material properties, achieved through changes in the cell-wall microstructure, or passive fibre reorientation may suppress cell elongation. We then investigate how the action of enzymes on the cell wall microstructure can lead to the required dynamic changes in macroscale wall material properties, and thus demonstrate a mechanism by which hormones may regulate plant growth.
The Kazdan-Warner equation
12:10 Mon 2 Apr, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Damien Warman :: University of Adelaide

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We look at an equation arising from the differential-geometric problem of specifying the scalar curvature of a manifold.
New examples of totally disconnected, locally compact groups
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Murray Elder :: University of Newcastle

I will attempt to explain what a totally disconnected, locally compact group is, and then describe some new work with George Willis on an attempt to create new examples based on Baumslag-Solitar groups, which are well known, tried and tested examples/counterexamples in geometric/combinatorial group theory. I will describe how to compute invariants of scale and flat rank for these groups.
Acyclic embeddings of open Riemann surfaces into new examples of elliptic manifolds
13:10 Fri 4 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

In complex geometry a manifold is Stein if there are, in a certain sense, "many" holomorphic maps from the manifold into C^n. While this has long been well understood, a fruitful definition of the dual notion has until recently been elusive. In Oka theory, a manifold is Oka if it satisfies several equivalent definitions, each stating that the manifold has "many" holomorphic maps into it from C^n. Related to this is the geometric condition of ellipticity due to Gromov, who showed that it implies a complex manifold is Oka. We present recent contributions to three open questions involving elliptic and Oka manifolds. We show that affine quotients of C^n are elliptic, and combine this with an example of Margulis to construct new elliptic manifolds of interesting homotopy types. It follows that every open Riemann surface properly acyclically embeds into an elliptic manifold, extending an existing result for open Riemann surfaces with abelian fundamental group.
Geometric modular representation theory
13:10 Fri 1 Jun, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Anthony Henderson :: University of Sydney

Representation theory is one of the oldest areas of algebra, but many basic questions in it are still unanswered. This is especially true in the modular case, where one considers vector spaces over a field F of positive characteristic; typically, complications arise for particular small values of the characteristic. For example, from a vector space V one can construct the symmetric square S^2(V), which is one easy example of a representation of the group GL(V). One would like to say that this representation is irreducible, but that statement is not always true: if F has characteristic 2, there is a nontrivial invariant subspace. Even for GL(V), we do not know the dimensions of all irreducible representations in all characteristics. In this talk, I will introduce some of the main ideas of geometric modular representation theory, a more recent approach which is making progress on some of these old problems. Essentially, the strategy is to re-formulate everything in terms of homology of various topological spaces, where F appears only as the field of coefficients and the spaces themselves are independent of F; thus, the modular anomalies in representation theory arise because homology with modular coefficients is detecting something about the topology that rational coefficients do not. In practice, the spaces are usually varieties over the complex numbers, and homology is replaced by intersection cohomology to take into account the singularities of these varieties.
K-theory and unbounded Fredholm operators
13:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Jerry Kaminker :: University of California, Davis

There are several ways of viewing elements of K^1(X). One of these is via families of unbounded self-adjoint Fredholm operators on X. Each operator will have discrete spectrum, with infinitely many positive and negative eigenvalues of finite multiplicity. One can associate to such a family a geometric object, its graph, and the Chern character and other invariants of the family can be studied from this perspective. By restricting the dimension of the eigenspaces one may sometimes use algebraic topology to completely determine the family up to equivalence. This talk will describe the general framework and some applications to families on low-dimensional manifolds where the methods work well. Various notions related to spectral flow, the index gerbe and Berry phase play roles which will be discussed. This is joint work with Ron Douglas.
The importance of being fractal
13:10 Tue 7 Aug, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Tony Roberts :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Euclid's geometry describes the world around us in terms of points, lines and planes. For two thousand years these have formed the limited repertoire of basic geometric objects with which to describe the universe. Fractals immeasurably enhance this world-view by providing a description of much around us that is rough and fragmented---of objects that have structure on many sizes.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
13:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University, Hannover

Traditionally, the geometric quantisation of an action by a compact Lie group on a compact symplectic manifold is defined as the equivariant index of a certain Dirac operator. This index is a well-defined formal difference of finite-dimensional representations, since the Dirac operator is elliptic and the manifold and the group in question are compact. From a mathematical and physical point of view however, it is very desirable to extend geometric quantisation to noncompact groups and manifolds. Defining a suitable index is much harder in the noncompact setting, but several interesting results in this direction have been obtained. I will review the difficulties connected to noncompact geometric quantisation, and some of the solutions that have been proposed so far, mainly in connection to the "quantisation commutes with reduction" principle. (An introduction to this principle will be given in my talk at the Colloquium on the same day.)
Quantisation commutes with reduction
15:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University Hannover

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The "Quantisation commutes with reduction" principle is an idea from physics, which has powerful applications in mathematics. It basically states that the ways in which symmetry can be used to simplify a physical system in classical and quantum mechanics, are compatible. This provides a strong link between the areas in mathematics used to describe symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics: symplectic geometry and representation theory, respectively. It has been proved in the 1990s that quantisation indeed commutes with reduction, under the important assumption that all spaces and symmetry groups involved are compact. This talk is an introduction to this principle and, if time permits, its mathematical relevance.
The space of cubic rational maps
13:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Mr Alexander Hanysz :: University of Adelaide

For each natural number d, the space of rational maps of degree d on the Riemann sphere has the structure of a complex manifold. The topology of these manifolds has been extensively studied. The recent development of Oka theory raises some new and interesting questions about their complex structure. We apply geometric invariant theory to the degree 3 case, studying a double action of the Mobius group on the space of cubic rational maps. We show that the categorical quotient is C, and that the space of cubic rational maps enjoys the holomorphic flexibility properties of strong dominability and C-connectedness.
Conformal Killing spinors in Riemannian and Lorentzian geometry
12:10 Fri 19 Apr, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Helga Baum :: Humboldt University

Conformal Killing spinors are the solutions of the conformally covariant twistor equation on spinors. Special cases are parallel and Killing spinors, the latter appear as eigenspinors of the Dirac operator on compact Riemannian manifolds of positive scalar curvature for the smallest possible positive eigenvalue. In the talk I will discuss geometric properties of manifolds admitting (conformal) Killing spinors. In particular, I will explain a local classification of the special geometric structures admitting conformal Killing spinors without zeros in the Riemannian as well as in the Lorentzian setting.
Neuronal excitability and canards
15:10 Fri 10 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Martin Wechselberger :: University of Sydney

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The notion of excitability was first introduced in an attempt to understand firing properties of neurons. It was Alan Hodgkin who identified three basic types (classes) of excitable axons (integrator, resonator and differentiator) distinguished by their different responses to injected steps of currents of various amplitudes. Pioneered by Rinzel and Ermentrout, bifurcation theory explains repetitive (tonic) firing patterns for adequate steady inputs in integrator (type I) and resonator (type II) neuronal models. In contrast, the dynamic behavior of differentiator (type III) neurons cannot be explained by standard dynamical systems theory. This third type of excitable neuron encodes a dynamic change in the input and leads naturally to a transient response of the neuron. In this talk, I will show that "canards" - peculiar mathematical creatures - are well suited to explain the nature of transient responses of neurons due to dynamic (smooth) inputs. I will apply this geometric theory to a simple driven FitzHugh-Nagumo/Morris-Lecar type neural model and to a more complicated neural model that describes paradoxical excitation due to propofol anesthesia.
K-homology and the quantization commutes with reduction problem
12:10 Fri 5 Jul, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Higson :: Pennsylvania State University

The quantization commutes with reduction problem for Hamiltonian actions of compact Lie groups was solved by Meinrenken in the mid-1990s using geometric techniques, and solved again shortly afterwards by Tian and Zhang using analytic methods. In this talk I shall outline some of the close links that exist between the problem, the two solutions, and the geometric and analytic versions of K-homology theory that are studied in noncommutative geometry. I shall try to make the case for K-homology as a useful conceptual framework for the solutions and (at least some of) their various generalizations.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

In this talk we shall report on a program of using the recent framework of twisted spectral triples to study conformal geometry from a noncommutative geometric perspective. One result is a local index formula in conformal geometry taking into account the action of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms. Another result is a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality for twisted spectral triples. Geometric applications include a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality in conformal geometry. There are also noncommutative versions for spectral triples over noncommutative tori and duals of discrete cocompact subgroups of semisimple Lie groups satisfying the Baum-Connes conjecture. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Symmetry gaps for geometric structures
15:10 Fri 20 Sep, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dennis The :: Australian National University

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Klein's Erlangen program classified geometries based on their (transitive) groups of symmetries, e.g. Euclidean geometry is the quotient of the rigid motion group by the subgroup of rotations. While this perspective is homogeneous, Riemann's generalization of Euclidean geometry is in general very "lumpy" - i.e. there exist Riemannian manifolds that have no symmetries at all. A common generalization where a group still plays a dominant role is Cartan geometry, which first arose in Cartan's solution to the equivalence problem for geometric structures, and which articulates what a "curved version" of a flat (homogeneous) model means. Parabolic geometries are Cartan geometries modelled on (generalized) flag varieties (e.g. projective space, isotropic Grassmannians) which are well-known objects from the representation theory of semisimple Lie groups. These curved versions encompass a zoo of interesting geometries, including conformal, projective, CR, systems of 2nd order ODE, etc. This interaction between differential geometry and representation theory has proved extremely fruitful in recent years. My talk will be an example-based tour of various types of parabolic geometries, which I'll use to outline some of the main aspects of the theory (suppressing technical details). The main thread throughout the talk will be the symmetry gap problem: For a given type of Cartan geometry, the maximal symmetry dimension is realized by the flat model, but what is the next possible ("submaximal") symmetry dimension? I'll sketch a recent solution (in joint work with Boris Kruglikov) for a wide class of parabolic geometries which gives a combinatorial recipe for reading the submaximal symmetry dimension from a Dynkin diagram.
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
12:10 Fri 7 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

Geometric quantisation is a way to construct quantum mechanical phase spaces (Hilbert spaces) from classical mechanical phase spaces (symplectic manifolds). In the presence of a group action, the quantisation commutes with reduction principle states that geometric quantisation should be compatible with the ways the group action can be used to simplify (reduce) the classical and quantum phase spaces. This has deep consequences for the link between symplectic geometry and representation theory. The quantisation commutes with reduction principle has been given explicit meaning, and been proved, in cases where the symplectic manifold and the group acting on it are compact. There have also been results where just the group, or the orbit space of the action, is assumed to be compact. These are important and difficult, but it is somewhat frustrating that they do not even apply to the simplest example from the physics point of view: a free particle in Rn. This talk is about a joint result with Mathai Varghese where the group, manifold and orbit space may all be noncompact.
Lefschetz fixed point theorem and beyond
12:10 Fri 2 May, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

A Lefschetz number associated to a continuous map on a closed manifold is a topological invariant determined by the geometric information near the neighbourhood of fixed point set of the map. After an introduction of the Lefschetz fixed point theorem, we shall use the Dirac-dual Dirac method to derive the Lefschetz number on K-theory level. The method concerns the comparison of the Dirac operator on the manifold and the Dirac operator on some submanifold. This method can be generalised to several interesting situations when the manifold is not necessarily compact.
A geometric model for odd differential K-theory
12:10 Fri 9 May, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

Odd K-theory has the interesting property that-unlike even K-theory-it admits an infinite number of inequivalent differential refinements. In this talk I will give a description of odd differential K-theory using infinite rank bundles and explain why it is the correct differential refinement. This is joint work with Michael Murray, Pedram Hekmati and Vincent Schlegel.
Optimal transportation and Monge-Ampere type equation
15:10 Fri 13 Jun, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Xu-Jia Wang :: Centre for Mathematics and its Applications, Australian National University

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The optimal transportation is to find an optimal mapping of transferring one mass density to another one such that the total cost is minimised. This problem was first introduced by Monge in 1781. Monge's cost function is propositional to the distance the mass is transferred, namely c(x,y)=|x-y|, but more general costs are allowed. The optimal transportation has found a variety of applications and has been extensively studied since then. In 1940s Kantorovich introduced a dual functional, by which one can determine the optimal mapping through the associated potential function, for a large class of cost functions. The potential function satisfies a Monge-Ampere type equation, which is a fully nonlinear partial differential equation arising also in geometric problems related to the Gauss curvature, and has been studied by Aleksandrov, Calabi, Nirenberg, Pogorelov, Cheng-Yau, and Caffarelli, among many others. In this talk we will first introduce the optimal transportation and review the existence of optimal mappings. We then focus on the regularity of the optimal mappings. By studying the associated Monge-Ampere equation, sharp conditions on the cost function have been found by the speaker and his collaborators. For Monge's cost function |x-y|, which does not satisfy the sharp conditions, we have also obtained the existence of optimal mappings, and established interesting regularity and singularity results for the mapping.
The Dirichlet problem for the prescribed Ricci curvature equation
12:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Artem Pulemotov :: University of Queensland

We will discuss the following question: is it possible to find a Riemannian metric whose Ricci curvature is equal to a given tensor on a manifold M? To answer this question, one must analyze a weakly elliptic second-order geometric PDE. In the first part of the talk, we will review the history of the subject and state several classical theorems. After that, our focus will be on new results concerning the case where M has nonempty boundary.
Boundary-value problems for the Ricci flow
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Artem Pulemotov :: The University of Queensland

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The Ricci flow is a differential equation describing the evolution of a Riemannian manifold (i.e., a "curved" geometric object) into an Einstein manifold (i.e., an object with a "constant" curvature). This equation is particularly famous for its key role in the proof of the Poincare Conjecture. Understanding the Ricci flow on manifolds with boundary is a difficult problem with applications to a variety of fields, such as topology and mathematical physics. The talk will survey the current progress towards the resolution of this problem. In particular, we will discuss new results concerning spaces with symmetries.
Spectral asymptotics on random Sierpinski gaskets
12:10 Fri 26 Sep, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Uta Freiberg :: Universitaet Stuttgart

Self similar fractals are often used in modeling porous media. Hence, defining a Laplacian and a Brownian motion on such sets describes transport through such materials. However, the assumption of strict self similarity could be too restricting. So, we present several models of random fractals which could be used instead. After recalling the classical approaches of random homogenous and recursive random fractals, we show how to interpolate between these two model classes with the help of so called V-variable fractals. This concept (developed by Barnsley, Hutchinson & Stenflo) allows the definition of new families of random fractals, hereby the parameter V describes the degree of `variability' of the realizations. We discuss how the degree of variability influences the geometric, analytic and stochastic properties of these sets. - These results have been obtained with Ben Hambly (University of Oxford) and John Hutchinson (ANU Canberra).
Topology, geometry, and moduli spaces
12:10 Fri 10 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Nick Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

In recent years, moduli spaces of one kind or another have been shown to be of great utility, this quite apart from their inherent interest. Many of their applications involve their topology, but as we all know, understanding of topological structures is often facilitated through the use of geometric methods, and some of these moduli spaces carry geometric structures that are considerable interest in their own right. In this talk, I will describe some of the background and the ideas in this general context, focusing on questions that I have been considering lately together with my colleague Georg Schumacher from Marburg in Germany, who was visiting us recently.
Geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory to study travelling waves in: 1) a model for tumor invasion; and 2) a model for wound healing angiogenesis.
15:10 Fri 17 Oct, 2014 :: EM 218 Engineering & Mathematics Building :: Dr Petrus (Peter) van Heijster :: QUT

In this talk, I will present results on the existence of smooth and shock-like travelling wave solutions for two advection-reaction-diffusion models. The first model describes malignant tumour (i.e. skin cancer) invasion, while the second one is a model for wound healing angiogenesis. Numerical solutions indicate that both smooth and shock-fronted travelling wave solutions exist for these two models. I will verify the existence of both type of these solutions using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory and canard theory. Moreover, I will provide numerical results on the stability of the waves and the actual observed wave speeds. This is joint work with K. Harley, G. Pettet, R. Marangell and M. Wechselberger.
The Serre-Grothendieck theorem by geometric means
12:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

The Serre-Grothendieck theorem implies that every torsion integral 3rd cohomology class on a finite CW-complex is the invariant of some projective bundle. It was originally proved in a letter by Serre, used homotopical methods, most notably a Postnikov decomposition of a certain classifying space with divisible homotopy groups. In this talk I will outline, using work of the algebraic geometer Offer Gabber, a proof for compact smooth manifolds using geometric means and a little K-theory.
Boundary behaviour of Hitchin and hypo flows with left-invariant initial data
12:10 Fri 27 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Vicente Cortes :: University of Hamburg

Hitchin and hypo flows constitute a system of first order pdes for the construction of Ricci-flat Riemannian mertrics of special holonomy in dimensions 6, 7 and 8. Assuming that the initial geometric structure is left-invariant, we study whether the resulting Ricci-flat manifolds can be extended in a natural way to complete Ricci-flat manifolds. This talk is based on joint work with Florin Belgun, Marco Freibert and Oliver Goertsches, see arXiv:1405.1866 (math.DG).
Groups acting on trees
12:10 Fri 10 Apr, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Anitha Thillaisundaram :: Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf

From a geometric point of view, branch groups are groups acting spherically transitively on a spherically homogeneous rooted tree. The applications of branch groups reach out to analysis, geometry, combinatorics, and probability. The early construction of branch groups were the Grigorchuk group and the Gupta-Sidki p-groups. Among its many claims to fame, the Grigorchuk group was the first example of a group of intermediate growth (i.e. neither polynomial nor exponential). Here we consider a generalisation of the family of Grigorchuk-Gupta-Sidki groups, and we examine the restricted occurrence of their maximal subgroups.
The twistor equation on Lorentzian Spin^c manifolds
12:10 Fri 15 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Andree Lischewski :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I consider a conformally covariant spinor field equation, called the twistor equation, which can be formulated on any Lorentzian Spin^c manifold. Its solutions have become of importance in the study of supersymmetric field theories in recent years and were named "charged conformal Killing spinors". After a short review of conformal Spin^c geometry in Lorentzian signature, I will briefly discuss the emergence of charged conformal Killing spinors in supergravity. I will then focus on special geometric structures related to the twistor equation and use charged conformal Killing spinors in order to establish a link between conformal and CR geometry.
Instantons and Geometric Representation Theory
12:10 Thu 23 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Professor Richard Szabo :: Heriot-Watt University

We give an overview of the various approaches to studying supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on ALE spaces, and their conjectural connections to two-dimensional conformal field theory via AGT-type dualities. From a mathematical perspective, this is formulated as a relationship between the equivariant cohomology of certain moduli spaces of sheaves on stacks and the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras. We introduce an orbifold compactification of the minimal resolution of the A-type toric singularity in four dimensions, and then construct a moduli space of framed sheaves which is conjecturally isomorphic to a Nakajima quiver variety. We apply this construction to derive relations between the equivariant cohomology of these moduli spaces and the representation theory of the affine Lie algebra of type A.
Dirac operators and Hamiltonian loop group action
12:10 Fri 24 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Yanli Song :: University of Toronto

A definition to the geometric quantization for compact Hamiltonian G-spaces is given by Bott, defined as the index of the Spinc-Dirac operator on the manifold. In this talk, I will explain how to generalize this idea to the Hamiltonian LG-spaces. Instead of quantizing infinite-dimensional manifolds directly, we use its equivalent finite-dimensional model, the quasi-Hamiltonian G-spaces. By constructing twisted spinor bundle and twisted pre-quantum bundle on the quasi-Hamiltonian G-space, we define a Dirac operator whose index are given by positive energy representation of loop groups. A key role in the construction will be played by the algebraic cubic Dirac operator for loop algebra. If time permitted, I will also explain how to prove the quantization commutes with reduction theorem for Hamiltonian LG-spaces under this framework.
Workshop on Geometric Quantisation
10:10 Mon 27 Jul, 2015 :: Level 7 conference room Ingkarni Wardli :: Michele Vergne, Weiping Zhang, Eckhard Meinrenken, Nigel Higson and many others

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Geometric quantisation has been an increasingly active area since before the 1980s, with links to physics, symplectic geometry, representation theory, index theory, and differential geometry and geometric analysis in general. In addition to its relevance as a field on its own, it acts as a focal point for the interaction between all of these areas, which has yielded far-reaching and powerful results. This workshop features a large number of international speakers, who are all well-known for their work in (differential) geometry, representation theory and/or geometric analysis. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in these areas to meet and learn from some of the top mathematicians in the world. Students are especially welcome. Registration is free.
Quantising proper actions on Spin-c manifolds
11:00 Fri 31 Jul, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli Level 7 Room 7.15 :: Peter Hochs :: The University of Adelaide

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For a proper action by a Lie group on a Spin-c manifold (both of which may be noncompact), we study an index of deformations of the Spin-c Dirac operator, acting on the space of spinors invariant under the group action. When applied to spinors that are square integrable transversally to orbits in a suitable sense, the kernel of this operator turns out to be finite-dimensional, under certain hypotheses of the deformation. This also allows one to show that the index has the quantisation commutes with reduction property (as proved by Meinrenken in the compact symplectic case, and by Paradan-Vergne in the compact Spin-c case), for sufficiently large powers of the determinant line bundle. Furthermore, this result extends to Spin-c Dirac operators twisted by vector bundles. A key ingredient of the arguments is the use of a family of inner products on the Lie algebra, depending on a point in the manifold. This is joint work with Mathai Varghese.
Quantisation of Hitchin's moduli space
12:10 Fri 22 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Siye Wu :: National Tsing Hua Univeristy

In this talk, I construct prequantum line bundles on Hitchin's moduli spaces of orientable and non-orientable surfaces and study the geometric quantisation and quantisation via branes by complexification of the moduli spaces.
The parametric h-principle for minimal surfaces in R^n and null curves in C^n
12:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

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I will describe new joint work with Franc Forstneric (arXiv:1602.01529). This work brings together four diverse topics from differential geometry, holomorphic geometry, and topology; namely the theory of minimal surfaces, Oka theory, convex integration theory, and the theory of absolute neighborhood retracts. Our goal is to determine the rough shape of several infinite-dimensional spaces of maps of geometric interest. It turns out that they all have the same rough shape.
Expanding maps
12:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Andy Hammerlindl :: Monash University

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Consider a function from the circle to itself such that the derivative is greater than one at every point. Examples are maps of the form f(x) = mx for integers m > 1. In some sense, these are the only possible examples. This fact and the corresponding question for maps on higher dimensional manifolds was a major motivation for Gromov to develop pioneering results in the field of geometric group theory. In this talk, I'll give an overview of this and other results relating dynamical systems to the geometry of the manifolds on which they act and (time permitting) talk about my own work in the area.
Geometric analysis of gap-labelling
12:10 Fri 8 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

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Using an earlier result, joint with Quillen, I will formulate a gap labelling conjecture for magnetic Schrodinger operators with smooth aperiodic potentials on Euclidean space. Results in low dimensions will be given, and the formulation of the same problem for certain non-Euclidean spaces will be given if time permits. This is ongoing joint work with Moulay Benameur.
Sard Theorem for the endpoint map in sub-Riemannian manifolds
12:10 Fri 29 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Alessandro Ottazzi :: University of New South Wales

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Sub-Riemannian geometries occur in several areas of pure and applied mathematics, including harmonic analysis, PDEs, control theory, metric geometry, geometric group theory, and neurobiology. We introduce sub-Riemannian manifolds and give some examples. Therefore we discuss some of the open problems, and in particular we focus on the Sard Theorem for the endpoint map, which is related to the study of length minimizers. Finally, we consider some recent results obtained in collaboration with E. Le Donne, R. Montgomery, P. Pansu and D. Vittone.
Harmonic Analysis in Rough Contexts
15:10 Fri 13 May, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Pierre Portal :: Australian National University

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In recent years, perspectives on what constitutes the ``natural" framework within which to conduct various forms of mathematical analysis have shifted substantially. The common theme of these shifts can be described as a move towards roughness, i.e. the elimination of smoothness assumptions that had previously been considered fundamental. Examples include partial differential equations on domains with a boundary that is merely Lipschitz continuous, geometric analysis on metric measure spaces that do not have a smooth structure, and stochastic analysis of dynamical systems that have nowhere differentiable trajectories. In this talk, aimed at a general mathematical audience, I describe some of these shifts towards roughness, placing an emphasis on harmonic analysis, and on my own contributions. This includes the development of heat kernel methods in situations where such a kernel is merely a distribution, and applications to deterministic and stochastic partial differential equations.
Twists over etale groupoids and twisted vector bundles
12:10 Fri 22 Jul, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Elizabeth Gillaspy :: University of Colorado, Boulder

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Given a twist over an etale groupoid, one can construct an associated C*-algebra which carries a good deal of geometric and physical meaning; for example, the K-theory group of this C*-algebra classifies D-brane charges in string theory. Twisted vector bundles, when they exist, give rise to particularly important elements in this K-theory group. In this talk, we will explain how to use the classifying space of the etale groupoid to construct twisted vector bundles, under some mild hypotheses on the twist and the classifying space. My hope is that this talk will be accessible to a broad audience; in particular, no prior familiarity with groupoids, their twists, or the associated C*-algebras will be assumed. This is joint work with Carla Farsi.
Calculus on symplectic manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Aug, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mike Eastwood :: University of Adelaide

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One can use the symplectic form to construct an elliptic complex replacing the de Rham complex. Then, under suitable curvature conditions, one can form coupled versions of this complex. Finally, on complex projective space, these constructions give rise to a series of elliptic complexes with geometric consequences for the Fubini-Study metric and its X-ray transform. This talk, which will start from scratch, is based on the work of many authors but, especially, current joint work with Jan Slovak.
Energy quantisation for the Willmore functional
11:10 Fri 7 Oct, 2016 :: Ligertwood 314 Flinders Room :: Yann Bernard :: Monash University

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We prove a bubble-neck decomposition and an energy quantisation result for sequences of Willmore surfaces immersed into R^(m>=3) with uniformly bounded energy and non-degenerating conformal structure. We deduce the strong compactness (modulo the action of the Moebius group) of closed Willmore surfaces of a given genus below some energy threshold. This is joint-work with Tristan Riviere (ETH Zuerich).
Character Formula for Discrete Series
12:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

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Weyl character formula describes characters of irreducible representations of compact Lie groups. This formula can be obtained using geometric method, for example, from the Atiyah-Bott fixed point theorem or the Atiyah-Segal-Singer index theorem. Harish-Chandra character formula, the noncompact analogue of the Weyl character formula, can also be studied from the point of view of index theory. We apply orbital integrals on K-theory of Harish-Chandra Schwartz algebra of a semisimple Lie group G, and then use geometric method to deduce Harish-Chandra character formulas for discrete series representations of G. This is work in progress with Peter Hochs.
What is index theory?
12:10 Tue 21 Mar, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Index theory is a link between topology, geometry and analysis. A typical theorem in index theory says that two numbers are equal: an analytic index and a topological index. The first theorem of this kind was the index theorem of Atiyah and Singer, which they proved in 1963. Index theorems have many applications in maths and physics. For example, they can be used to prove that a differential equation must have a solution. Also, they imply that the topology of a space like a sphere or a torus determines in what ways it can be curved. Topology is the study of geometric properties that do not change if we stretch or compress a shape without cutting or glueing. Curvature does change when we stretch something out, so it is surprising that topology can say anything about curvature. Index theory has many surprising consequences like this.
Geometric structures on moduli spaces
12:10 Fri 31 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

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Moduli spaces are used to classify various kinds of objects, often arising from solutions of certain differential equations on manifolds; for example, the complex structures on a compact surface or the anti-self-dual Yang-Mills equations on an oriented smooth 4-manifold. Sometimes these moduli spaces carry important information about the underlying manifold, manifested most clearly in the results of Donaldson and others on the topology of smooth 4-manifolds. It is also the case that these moduli spaces themselves carry interesting geometric structures; for example, the Weil-Petersson metric on moduli spaces of compact Riemann surfaces, exploited to great effect by Maryam Mirzakhani. In this talk, I shall elaborate on the theme of geometric structures on moduli spaces, with particular focus on some recent-ish work done in conjunction with Georg Schumacher.
K-types of tempered representations
12:10 Fri 7 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of a reductive Lie group G are the irreducible unitary representations one needs in the Plancherel decomposition of L^2(G). They are relevant to harmonic analysis because of this, and also occur in the Langlands classification of the larger class of admissible representations. If K in G is a maximal compact subgroup, then there is a considerable amount of information in the restriction of a tempered representation to K. In joint work with Yanli Song and Shilin Yu, we give a geometric expression for the decomposition of such a restriction into irreducibles. The multiplicities of these irreducibles are expressed as indices of Dirac operators on reduced spaces of a coadjoint orbit of G corresponding to the representation. These reduced spaces are Spin-c analogues of reduced spaces in symplectic geometry, defined in terms of moment maps that represent conserved quantities. This result involves a Spin-c version of the quantisation commutes with reduction principle for noncompact manifolds. For discrete series representations, this was done by Paradan in 2003.
Geometric limits of knot complements
12:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

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The complement of a knot often admits a hyperbolic metric: a metric with constant curvature -1. In this talk, we will investigate sequences of hyperbolic knots, and the possible spaces they converge to as a geometric limit. In particular, we show that there exist hyperbolic knots in the 3-sphere such that the set of points of large injectivity radius in the complement take up the bulk of the volume. This is joint work with Autumn Kent.
Hyperbolic geometry and knots
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: A/Prof Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

It has been known since the early 1980s that the complement of a knot or link decomposes into geometric pieces, and the most common geometry is hyperbolic. However, the connections between hyperbolic geometry and other knot and link invariants are not well-understood. Conjectured connections have applications to quantum topology and physics, 3-manifold geometry and topology, and knot theory. In this talk, we will describe several results relating the hyperbolic geometry of a knot or link to other invariants, and their implications.
Constructing differential string structures
14:10 Wed 7 Jun, 2017 :: EM213 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

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String structures on a manifold are analogous to spin structures, except instead of lifting the structure group through the extension Spin(n)\to SO(n) of Lie groups, we need to lift through the extension String(n)\to Spin(n) of Lie *2-groups*. Such a thing exists if the first fractional Pontryagin class (1/2)p_1 vanishes in cohomology. A differential string structure also lifts connection data, but this is rather complicated, involving a number of locally defined differential forms satisfying cocycle-like conditions. This is an expansion of the geometric string structures of Stolz and Redden, which is, for a given connection A, merely a 3-form R on the frame bundle such that dR = tr(F^2) for F the curvature of A; in other words a trivialisation of the de Rham class of (1/2)p_1. I will present work in progress on a framework (and specific results) that allows explicit calculation of the differential string structure for a large class of homogeneous spaces, which also yields formulas for the Stolz-Redden form. I will comment on the application to verifying the refined Stolz conjecture for our particular class of homogeneous spaces. Joint work with Ray Vozzo.
Conway's Rational Tangle
12:10 Tue 15 Aug, 2017 :: Inkgarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Hang Wang :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Many researches in mathematics essentially feature some classification problems. In this context, invariants are created in order to associate algebraic quantities, such as numbers and groups, to elements of interested classes of geometric objects, such as surfaces. A key property of an invariant is that it does not change under ``allowable moves'' which can be specified in various geometric contexts. We demonstrate these lines of ideas by rational tangles, a notion in knot theory. A tangle is analogous to a link except that it has free ends. Conway's rational tangles are the simplest tangles that can be ``unwound'' under a finite sequence of two simple moves, and they arise as building blocks for knots. A numerical invariant will be introduced for Conway's rational tangles and it provides the only known example of a complete invariant in knot theory.
End-periodic K-homology and spin bordism
12:10 Fri 20 Oct, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Michael Hallam :: University of Adelaide

This talk introduces new "end-periodic" variants of geometric K-homology and spin bordism theories that are tailored to a recent index theorem for even-dimensional manifolds with periodic ends. This index theorem, due to Mrowka, Ruberman and Saveliev, is a generalisation of the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem for manifolds with odd-dimensional boundary. As in the APS index theorem, there is an (end-periodic) eta invariant that appears as a correction term for the periodic end. Invariance properties of the standard relative eta invariants are elegantly expressed using K-homology and spin bordism, and this continues to hold in the end-periodic case. In fact, there are natural isomorphisms between the standard K-homology/bordism theories and their end-periodic versions, and moreover these isomorphisms preserve relative eta invariants. The study is motivated by results on positive scalar curvature, namely obstructions and distinct path components of the moduli space of PSC metrics. Our isomorphisms provide a systematic method for transferring certain results on PSC from the odd-dimensional case to the even-dimensional case. This work is joint with Mathai Varghese.
Stability Through a Geometric Lens
15:10 Fri 18 May, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Dr Robby Marangell :: University of Sydney

Focussing on the example of the Fisher/KPP equation, I will show how geometric information can be used to establish (in)stability results in some partial differential equations (PDEs). Viewing standing and travelling waves as fixed points of a flow in an infinite dimensional system, leads to a reduction of the linearised stability problem to a boundary value problem in a linear non-autonomous ordinary differential equation (ODE). Next, by exploiting the linearity of the system, one can use geometric ideas to reveal additional structure underlying the determination of stability. I will show how the Riccati equation can be used to produce a reasonably computable detector of eigenvalues and how such a detector is related to another, well-known eigenvalue detector, the Evans function. If there is time, I will try to expand on how to generalise these ideas to systems of PDEs.
Hitchin's Projectively Flat Connection for the Moduli Space of Higgs Bundles
13:10 Fri 15 Jun, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: John McCarthy :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I will discuss the problem of geometrically quantizing the moduli space of Higgs bundles on a compact Riemann surface using Kahler polarisations. I will begin by introducing geometric quantization via Kahler polarisations for compact manifolds, leading up to the definition of a Hitchin connection as stated by Andersen. I will then describe the moduli spaces of stable bundles and Higgs bundles over a compact Riemann surface, and discuss their properties. The problem of geometrically quantizing the moduli space of stables bundles, a compact space, was solved independently by Hitchin and Axelrod, Del PIetra, and Witten. The Higgs moduli space is non-compact and therefore the techniques used do not apply, but carries an action of C*. I will finish the talk by discussing the problem of finding a Hitchin connection that preserves this C* action. Such a connection exists in the case of Higgs line bundles, and I will comment on the difficulties in higher rank.
The topology and geometry of spaces of Yang-Mills-Higgs flow lines
11:10 Fri 27 Jul, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Graeme Wilkin :: National University of Singapore

Given a smooth complex vector bundle over a compact Riemann surface, one can define the space of Higgs bundles and an energy functional on this space: the Yang-Mills-Higgs functional. The gradient flow of this functional resembles a nonlinear heat equation, and the limit of the flow detects information about the algebraic structure of the initial Higgs bundle (e.g. whether or not it is semistable). In this talk I will explain my work to classify ancient solutions of the Yang-Mills-Higgs flow in terms of their algebraic structure, which leads to an algebro-geometric classification of Yang-Mills-Higgs flow lines. Critical points connected by flow lines can then be interpreted in terms of the Hecke correspondence, which appears in Witten’s recent work on Geometric Langlands. This classification also gives a geometric description of spaces of unbroken flow lines in terms of secant varieties of the underlying Riemann surface, and in the remaining time I will describe work in progress to relate the (analytic) Morse compactification of these spaces by broken flow lines to an algebro-geometric compactification by iterated blowups of secant varieties.
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.
An Introduction to Ricci Flow
11:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Miles Simon :: University of Magdeburg

In these three talks we give an introduction to Ricci flow and present some applications thereof. After introducing the Ricci flow we present some theorems and arguments from the theory of linear and non-linear parabolic equations. We explain why this theory guarantees that there is always a solution to the Ricci flow for a short time for any given smooth initial metric on a compact manifold without boundary. We calculate evolution equations for certain geometric quantities, and present some examples of maximum principle type arguments. In the last lecture we present some geometric results which are derived with the help of the Ricci flow.

News matching "Geometric quantisation"

ARC success
The School of Mathematical Sciences was again very successful in attracting Australian Research Council funding for 2008. Recipients of ARC Discovery Projects are (with staff from the School highlighted):

Prof NG Bean; Prof PG Howlett; Prof CE Pearce; Prof SC Beecham; Dr AV Metcalfe; Dr JW Boland: WaterLog - A mathematical model to implement recommendations of The Wentworth Group.

2008-2010: $645,000

Prof RJ Elliott: Dynamic risk measures. (Australian Professorial Fellowship)

2008-2012: $897,000

Dr MD Finn: Topological Optimisation of Fluid Mixing.

2008-2010: $249,000

Prof PG Bouwknegt; Prof M Varghese; A/Prof S Wu: Dualities in String Theory and Conformal Field Theory in the context of the Geometric Langlands Program.

2008-2010: $240,000

The latter grant is held through the ANU Posted Wed 26 Sep 07.

New Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science
Professor Mathai Varghese, Professor of Pure Mathematics and ARC Professorial Fellow within the School of Mathematical Sciences, was elected to the Australian Academy of Science. Professor Varghese's citation read "for his distinguished for his work in geometric analysis involving the topology of manifolds, including the Mathai-Quillen formalism in topological field theory.". Posted Tue 30 Nov 10.
Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project is expected to enhance Australia’s position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project will enhance Australia's position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Publications matching "Geometric quantisation"

Publications
Schlicht Envelopes of Holomorphy and Foliations by Lines
Larusson, Finnur; Shafikov, R, Journal of Geometric Analysis 19 (373–389) 2009
Geometric constructions of optimal linear perfect hash families
Barwick, Susan; Jackson, Wen-Ai, Finite Fields and Their Applications 14 (1–13) 2007
Prolongations of geometric overdetermined systems
Branson, T; Cap, A; Eastwood, Michael; Gover, A, International Journal of Mathematics 17 (641–664) 2006
Smoothly parameterized ech cohomology of complex manifolds
Bailey, T; Eastwood, Michael; Gindikin, S, Journal of Geometric Analysis 15 (9–23) 2005
Smoothly parameterized Cech cohomology of complex manifolds
Bailey, T; Eastwood, Michael; Gindikin, S, Journal of Geometric Analysis 15 (9–23) 2005
Geometric means, index mappings and entropy
Comanescu, D; Dragomir, S; Pearce, Charles, chapter in Inequality theory and applications - Volume 3 (Nova Science Publishers) 85–96, 2003
Geometric means, index mappings and supermultiplicativity
Pearce, Charles; Dragomir, S; Comanescu, D, chapter in Inequality theory and applications - Volume 2 (Nova Science Publishers) 193–201, 2003
The geometric triangle for 3-dimensional Seiberg-Witten monopoles
Carey, Alan; Marcolli, M; Wang, Bai-Ling, Communications in Contemporary Mathematics 5 (197–250) 2003
An edge-of-the-wedge theorum for hypersurface CR functions
Eastwood, Michael; Graham, C, Journal of Geometric Analysis 11 (589–602) 2001

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