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Associate Professor Sanjeeva Balasuriya
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor Benjamin Binder
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor David Clements
Reader/Associate Professor in Applied Mathematics


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Professor Tony Roberts
Professor of Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows"

Water waves and free-surface flows

Surface water waves occur in many physical situations that are familiar to most people. They include waves on the surface of an ocean, tsunamis, and waves generated by shipping vessels. The interface or boundary between the water and air is called the free-surface. During this course, students will encounter a variety of mathematical methods used to determine the shape of the free-surface, for linear and nonlinear water wave problems. This will enable us to study the fundamental properties of water wave propagation.

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Events matching "Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows"

Stability of time-periodic flows
15:10 Fri 10 Mar, 2006 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Andrew Bassom, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Western Australia

Time-periodic shear layers occur naturally in a wide range of applications from engineering to physiology. Transition to turbulence in such flows is of practical interest and there have been several papers dealing with the stability of flows composed of a steady component plus an oscillatory part with zero mean. In such flows a possible instability mechanism is associated with the mean component so that the stability of the flow can be examined using some sort of perturbation-type analysis. This strategy fails when the mean part of the flow is small compared with the oscillatory component which, of course, includes the case when the mean part is precisely zero.

This difficulty with analytical studies has meant that the stability of purely oscillatory flows has relied on various numerical methods. Until very recently such techniques have only ever predicted that the flow is stable, even though experiments suggest that they do become unstable at high enough speeds. In this talk I shall expand on this discrepancy with emphasis on the particular case of the so-called flat Stokes layer. This flow, which is generated in a deep layer of incompressible fluid lying above a flat plate which is oscillated in its own plane, represents one of the few exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. We show theoretically that the flow does become unstable to waves which propagate relative to the basic motion although the theory predicts that this occurs much later than has been found in experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are examined by reference to calculations for oscillatory flows in pipes and channels. Finally, we propose some new experiments that might reduce this disagreement between the theoretical predictions of instability and practical realisations of breakdown in oscillatory flows.
A mathematical look at dripping honey
15:10 Fri 4 May, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

Honey dripping from an upturned spoon is an everyday example of a flow that extends and breaks up into drops. Such flows have been of interest for over 300 years, attracting the attention of Plateau and Rayleigh among others. Theoretical understanding has, however, lagged behind experimental investigation, with major progress being made only in the last two decades, driven by industrial applications including ink-jet printing, spinning of polymer and glass fibres, blow-moulding of containers, light bulbs and glass tubing, and rheological measurement by fibre extension. Albeit, the exact details of the final stages of breakup are yet to be fully resolved. An aspect that is relatively unexplored is the evolution of drop and filament from some initial configuration, and the influence of initial conditions on the final breakup. We will consider a drop of very viscous fluid hanging beneath a solid boundary, similar to honey dripping from an upturned spoon, using methods that allow examination of development and behaviour from early time, when a drop and filament begin to form, out to large times when the bulk of the fluid forms a drop at the bottom of a long thin filament which connects it with the upper boundary. The roles of gravity, inertia and surface tension will be examined.
Similarity solutions for surface-tension driven flows
15:10 Fri 14 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof John Lister :: Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK

The breakup of a mass of fluid into drops is a ubiquitous phenomenon in daily life, the natural environment and technology, with common examples including a dripping tap, ocean spray and ink-jet printing. It is a feature of many generic industrial processes such as spraying, emulsification, aeration, mixing and atomisation, and is an undesirable feature in coating and fibre spinning. Surface-tension driven pinch-off and the subsequent recoil are examples of finite-time singularities in which the interfacial curvature becomes infinite at the point of disconnection. As a result, the flow near the point of disconnection becomes self-similar and independent of initial and far-field conditions. Similarity solutions will be presented for the cases of inviscid and very viscous flow, along with comparison to experiments. In each case, a boundary-integral representation can be used both to examine the time-dependent behaviour and as the basis of a modified Newton scheme for direct solution of the similarity equations.
Elliptic equation for diffusion-advection flows
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Pavel Bedrikovsetsky :: Australian School of Petroleum Science, University of Adelaide.

The standard diffusion equation is obtained by Einstein's method and its generalisation, Fokker-Plank-Kolmogorov-Feller theory. The time between jumps in Einstein derivation is constant.

We discuss random walks with residence time distribution, which occurs for flows of solutes and suspensions/colloids in porous media, CO2 sequestration in coal mines, several processes in chemical, petroleum and environmental engineering. The rigorous application of the Einstein's method results in new equation, containing the time and the mixed dispersion terms expressing the dispersion of the particle time steps.

Usually, adding the second time derivative results in additional initial data. For the equation derived, the condition of limited solution when time tends to infinity provides with uniqueness of the Caushy problem solution.

The solution of the pulse injection problem describing a common tracer injection experiment is studied in greater detail. The new theory predicts delay of the maximum of the tracer, compared to the velocity of the flow, while its forward "tail" contains much more particles than in the solution of the classical parabolic (advection-dispersion) equation. This is in agreement with the experimental observations and predictions of the direct simulation.

Free surface Stokes flows with surface tension
15:10 Fri 5 Sep, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Darren Crowdy :: Imperial College London

In this talk, we will survey a number of different free boundary problems involving slow viscous (Stokes) flows in which surface tension is active on the free boundary. Both steady and unsteady flows will be considered. Motivating applications range from industrial processes such as viscous sintering (where end-products are formed as a result of the surface-tension-driven densification of a compact of smaller particles that are heated in order that they coalesce) to biological phenomena such as understanding how organisms swim (i.e. propel themselves) at low Reynolds numbers. Common to our approach to all these problems will be an analytical/theoretical treatment of model problems via complex variable methods -- techniques well-known at infinite Reynolds numbers but used much less often in the Stokes regime. These model problems can give helpful insights into the behaviour of the true physical systems.
Mathematical modelling of blood flow in curved arteries
15:10 Fri 12 Sep, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Jennifer Siggers :: Imperial College London

Atherosclerosis, characterised by plaques, is the most common arterial disease. Plaques tend to develop in regions of low mean wall shear stress, and regions where the wall shear stress changes direction during the course of the cardiac cycle. To investigate the effect of the arterial geometry and driving pressure gradient on the wall shear stress distribution we consider an idealised model of a curved artery with uniform curvature. We assume that the flow is fully-developed and seek solutions of the governing equations, finding the effect of the parameters on the flow and wall shear stress distribution. Most previous work assumes the curvature ratio is asymptotically small; however, many arteries have significant curvature (e.g. the aortic arch has curvature ratio approx 0.25), and in this work we consider in particular the effect of finite curvature.

We present an extensive analysis of curved-pipe flow driven by a steady and unsteady pressure gradients. Increasing the curvature causes the shear stress on the inside of the bend to rise, indicating that the risk of plaque development would be overestimated by considering only the weak curvature limit.

Oceanographic Research at the South Australian Research and Development Institute: opportunities for collaborative research
15:10 Fri 21 Nov, 2008 :: Napier G04 :: Associate Prof John Middleton :: South Australian Research and Development Institute

Increasing threats to S.A.'s fisheries and marine environment have underlined the increasing need for soundly based research into the ocean circulation and ecosystems (phyto/zooplankton) of the shelf and gulfs. With support of Marine Innovation SA, the Oceanography Program has within 2 years, grown to include 6 FTEs and a budget of over $4.8M. The program currently leads two major research projects, both of which involve numerical and applied mathematical modelling of oceanic flow and ecosystems as well as statistical techniques for the analysis of data. The first is the implementation of the Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (SAIMOS) that is providing data to understand the dynamics of shelf boundary currents, monitor for climate change and understand the phyto/zooplankton ecosystems that under-pin SA's wild fisheries and aquaculture. SAIMOS involves the use of ship-based sampling, the deployment of underwater marine moorings, underwater gliders, HF Ocean RADAR, acoustic tracking of tagged fish and Autonomous Underwater vehicles.

The second major project involves measuring and modelling the ocean circulation and biological systems within Spencer Gulf and the impact on prawn larval dispersal and on the sustainability of existing and proposed aquaculture sites. The discussion will focus on opportunities for collaborative research with both faculty and students in this exciting growth area of S.A. science.

Boltzmann's Equations for Suspension Flow in Porous Media and Correction of the Classical Model
15:10 Fri 13 Mar, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Pavel Bedrikovetsky :: University of Adelaide

Suspension/colloid transport in porous media is a basic phenomenon in environmental, petroleum and chemical engineering. Suspension of particles moves through porous media and particles are captured by straining or attraction. We revise the classical equations for particle mass balance and particle capture kinetics and show its non-realistic behaviour in cases of large dispersion and of flow-free filtration. In order to resolve the paradoxes, the pore-scale model is derived. The model can be transformed to Boltzmann equation with particle distribution over pores. Introduction of sink-source terms into Boltzmann equation results in much more simple calculations if compared with the traditional Chapman-Enskog averaging procedure. Technique of projecting operators in Hilbert space of Fourier images is used. The projection subspace is constructed in a way to avoid dependency of averaged equations on sink-source terms. The averaging results in explicit expressions for particle flux and capture rate. The particle flux expression describes the effect of advective particle velocity decrease if compared with the carrier water velocity due to preferential capture of "slow" particles in small pores. The capture rate kinetics describes capture from either advective or diffusive fluxes. The equations derived exhibit positive advection velocity for any dispersion and particle capture in immobile fluid that resolves the above-mentioned paradox. Finally, we discuss validation of the model for propagation of contaminants in aquifers, for filtration, for potable water production by artesian wells, for formation damage in oilfields.
Understanding optimal linear transient growth in complex-geometry flows
15:00 Fri 27 Mar, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Associate Prof Hugh Blackburn :: Monash University

Magnetorotational instabilities in cylindrical Taylor-Couette flow
15:00 Fri 24 Apr, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Dr Rainer Hollerbach :: University of Leeds

Wall turbulence: from the laboratory to the atmosphere
15:00 Fri 29 May, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Ivan Marusic :: The University of Melbourne

The study of wall-bounded turbulent flows has received great attention over the past few years as a result of high Reynolds number experiments conducted in new high Reynolds number facilities such as the Princeton "superpipe", the NDF facility in Chicago and the HRNBLWT at the University of Melbourne. These experiments have brought into question the fundamental scaling laws of the turbulence and mean flow quantities as well as revealed high Reynolds number phenomena, which make extrapolation of low Reynolds number results highly questionable. In this talk these issues will be reviewed and new results from the HRNBLWT and atmospheric surface layer on the salt-flats of Utah will be presented documenting unique high Reynolds number phenomena. The implications for skin-friction drag reduction technologies and improved near-wall models for large-eddy simulation will be discussed.
Quadrature domains, p-Laplacian growth, and bubbles contracting in Hele-Shaw cells with a power-law fluid.
15:10 Mon 15 Jun, 2009 :: Napier LG24 :: Dr Scott McCue :: Queensland University Technology

The classical Hele-Shaw flow problem is related to Laplacian growth and null-quadrature domains. A generalisation is constructed for power-law fluids, governed by the p-Laplace equation, and a number of results are established that are analogous to the classical case. Both fluid clearance and bubble extinction is considered, and by considering two extremes of extinction behaviour, a rather complete asymptotic description of possible behaviours is found.
Nonlinear diffusion-driven flow in a stratified viscous fluid
15:00 Fri 26 Jun, 2009 :: Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Associate Prof Michael Page :: Monash University

In 1970, two independent studies (by Wunsch and Phillips) of the behaviour of a linear density-stratified viscous fluid in a closed container demonstrated a slow flow can be generated simply due to the container having a sloping boundary surface This remarkable motion is generated as a result of the curvature of the lines of constant density near any sloping surface, which in turn enables a zero normal-flux condition on the density to be satisfied along that boundary. When the Rayleigh number is large (or equivalently Wunsch's parameter $R$ is small) this motion is concentrated in the near vicinity of the sloping surface, in a thin `buoyancy layer' that has many similarities to an Ekman layer in a rotating fluid.

A number of studies have since considered the consequences of this type of `diffusively-driven' flow in a semi-infinite domain, including in the deep ocean and with turbulent effects included. More recently, Page & Johnson (2008) described a steady linear theory for the broader-scale mass recirculation in a closed container and demonstrated that, unlike in previous studies, it is possible for the buoyancy layer to entrain fluid from that recirculation. That work has since been extended (Page & Johnson, 2009) to the nonlinear regime of the problem and some of the similarities to and differences from the linear case will be described in this talk. Simple and elegant analytical solutions in the limit as $R \to 0$ still exist in some situations, and they will be compared with numerical simulations in a tilted square container at small values of $R$. Further work on both the unsteady flow properties and the flow for other geometrical configurations will also be described.

Generalizations of the Stein-Tomas restriction theorem
13:10 Fri 7 Aug, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

The Stein-Tomas restriction theorem says that the Fourier transform of a function in L^p(R^n) restricts to an L^2 function on the unit sphere, for p in some range [1, 2(n+1)/(n+3)]. I will discuss geometric generalizations of this result, by interpreting it as a property of the spectral measure of the Laplace operator on R^n, and then generalizing to the Laplace-Beltrami operator on certain complete Riemannian manifolds. It turns out that dynamical properties of the geodesic flow play a crucial role in determining whether a restriction-type theorem holds for these manifolds.
Predicting turbulence
12:10 Wed 12 Aug, 2009 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Turbulence is characterised by three-dimensional unsteady fluid motion over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. It is important in many problems of technological and scientific interest, such as drag reduction, energy production and climate prediction. In this talk, I will explain why turbulent flows are difficult to predict and describe a modern mathematical model of turbulence based on a random collection of fluid vortices.
Modelling fluid-structure interactions in micro-devices
15:00 Thu 3 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The flows generated in many modern micro-devices possess very little convective inertia, however, they can be highly unsteady and exert substantial hydrodynamic forces on the device components. Typically these components exhibit some degree of compliance, which traditionally has been treated using simple one-dimensional elastic beam models. However, recent findings have suggested that three-dimensional effects can be important and, accordingly, we consider the elastohydrodynamic response of a rapidly oscillating three-dimensional elastic plate that is immersed in a viscous fluid. In addition, a preliminary model will be presented which incorporates the presence of a nearby elastic wall.
Curved pipe flow and its stability
15:10 Fri 11 Sep, 2009 :: Badger labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Richard Clarke :: University of Auckland

The unsteady flow of a viscous fluid through a curved pipe is a widely occuring and well studied problem. The stability of such flows, however, has largely been overlooked; this is in marked contrast to flow through a straight-pipe, examination of which forms a cornerstone of hydrodynamic stability theory. Importantly, however, flow through a curved pipe exhibits an array of flow structures that are simply not present in the zero curvature limit, and it is natural to expect these to substantially impact upon the flow's stability. By considering two very different kinds of flows through a curved pipe, we illustrate that this can indeed be the case.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Analytic torsion for twisted de Rham complexes
13:10 Fri 30 Oct, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

We define analytic torsion for the twisted de Rham complex, consisting of differential forms on a compact Riemannian manifold X with coefficients in a flat vector bundle E, with a differential given by a flat connection on E plus a closed odd degree differential form on X. The definition in our case is more complicated than in the case discussed by Ray-Singer, as it uses pseudodifferential operators. We show that this analytic torsion is independent of the choice of metrics on X and E, establish some basic functorial properties, and compute it in many examples. We also establish the relationship of an invariant version of analytic torsion for T-dual circle bundles with closed 3-form flux. This is joint work with Siye Wu.
Eigen-analysis of fluid-loaded compliant panels
15:10 Wed 9 Dec, 2009 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Prof Tony Lucey :: Curtin University of Technology

This presentation concerns the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) that occurs between a fluid flow and an arbitrarily deforming flexible boundary considered to be a flexible panel or a compliant coating that comprises the wetted surface of a marine vehicle. We develop and deploy an approach that is a hybrid of computational and theoretical techniques. The system studied is two-dimensional and linearised disturbances are assumed. Of particular novelty in the present work is the ability of our methods to extract a full set of fluid-structure eigenmodes for systems that have strong spatial inhomogeneity in the structure of the flexible wall.

We first present the approach and some results of the system in which an ideal, zero-pressure gradient, flow interacts with a flexible plate held at both its ends. We use a combination of boundary-element and finite-difference methods to express the FSI system as a single matrix equation in the interfacial variable. This is then couched in state-space form and standard methods used to extract the system eigenvalues. It is then shown how the incorporation of spatial inhomogeneity in the stiffness of the plate can be either stabilising or destabilising. We also show that adding a further restraint within the streamwise extent of a homogeneous panel can trigger an additional type of hydroelastic instability at low flow speeds. The mechanism for the fluid-to-structure energy transfer that underpins this instability can be explained in terms of the pressure-signal phase relative to that of the wall motion and the effect on this relationship of the added wall restraint.

We then show how the ideal-flow approach can be conceptually extended to include boundary-layer effects. The flow field is now modelled by the continuity equation and the linearised perturbation momentum equation written in velocity-velocity form. The near-wall flow field is spatially discretised into rectangular elements on an Eulerian grid and a variant of the discrete-vortex method is applied. The entire fluid-structure system can again be assembled as a linear system for a single set of unknowns - the flow-field vorticity and the wall displacements - that admits the extraction of eigenvalues. We then show how stability diagrams for the fully-coupled finite flow-structure system can be assembled, in doing so identifying classes of wall-based or fluid-based and spatio-temporal wave behaviour.

Some unusual uses of usual symmetries and some usual uses of unusual symmetries
12:10 Wed 10 Mar, 2010 :: School board room :: Prof Phil Broadbridge :: La Trobe University

Ever since Sophus Lie around 1880, continuous groups of invariance transformations have been used to reduce variables and to construct special solutions of PDEs. I will outline the general ideas, then show some variations on the usual reduction algorithm that I have used to solve some practical nonlinear boundary value problems. Applications include soil-water flow, metal surface evolution and population genetics.
The Jeffery–Hamel similarity solution and its relation to flow in a diverging channel
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Phil Haines :: University of Adelaide

Jeffery–Hamel flows describe the steady two-dimensional flow of an incompressible viscous fluid between plane walls separated by an angle $\alpha$. They are often used to approximate the flow in domains of finite radial extent. However, whilst the base Jeffery–Hamel solution is characterised by a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation, studies in expanding channels of finite length typically find symmetry breaking via a supercritical bifurcation.

We use the finite element method to calculate solutions for flow in a two-dimensional wedge of finite length bounded by arcs of constant radii, $R_1$ and $R_2$. We present a comprehensive picture of the bifurcation structure and nonlinear states for a net radial outflow of fluid. We find a series of nested neutral curves in the Reynolds number-$\alpha$ plane corresponding to pitchfork bifurcations that break the midplane symmetry of the flow. We show that these finite domain bifurcations remain distinct from the similarity solution bifurcation even in the limit $R_2/R_1 \rightarrow \infty$.

We also discuss a class of stable steady solutions apparently related to a steady, spatially periodic, wave first observed by Tutty (1996). These solutions remain disconnected in our domain in the sense that they do not arise via a local bifurcation of the Stokes flow solution as the Reynolds number is increased.

The fluid mechanics of gels used in tissue engineering
15:10 Fri 9 Apr, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Edward Green :: University of Western Australia

Tissue engineering could be called 'the science of spare parts'. Although currently in its infancy, its long-term aim is to grow functional tissues and organs in vitro to replace those which have become defective through age, trauma or disease. Recent experiments have shown that mechanical interactions between cells and the materials in which they are grown have an important influence on tissue architecture, but in order to understand these effects, we first need to understand the mechanics of the gels themselves.

Many biological gels (e.g. collagen) used in tissue engineering have a fibrous microstructure which affects the way forces are transmitted through the material, and which in turn affects cell migration and other behaviours. I will present a simple continuum model of gel mechanics, based on treating the gel as a transversely isotropic viscous material. Two canonical problems are considered involving thin two-dimensional films: extensional flow, and squeezing flow of the fluid between two rigid plates. Neglecting inertia, gravity and surface tension, in each regime we can exploit the thin geometry to obtain a leading-order problem which is sufficiently tractable to allow the use of analytical methods. I discuss how these results could be exploited practically to determine the mechanical properties of real gels. If time permits, I will also talk about work currently in progress which explores the interaction between gel mechanics and cell behaviour.

Two problems in porous media flow
15:10 Tue 11 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Graeme Hocking :: Murdoch University

I will discuss two problems in porous media flow.

On a tropical island, fresh water may sit in the soil beneath the ground, floating on the ocean's salt water. This water is a valuable resource for the inhabitants, but requires sufficient rainfall to recharge the lens. In this paper, Green's functions are used to derive an integral equation to satisfy all of the conditions except those on the interfaces, which are then solved for numerically. Conditions under which the lens can be maintained will be described. This is work I did with an Honours student, Sue Chen, who is now at U. Melbourne.

In the second problem, I will discuss an "exact" solution to a problem in withdrawal from an unconfined aquifer. The problem formulation gives rise to a singular integral equation that can be solved using a nice orthogonality result I first met in airfoil theory. This is work with Hong Zhang from Griffith University.

Understanding convergence of meshless methods: Vortex methods and smoothed particle hydrodynamics
15:10 Fri 14 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Lou Rossi :: University of Delaware

Meshless methods such as vortex methods (VMs) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) schemes offer many advantages in fluid flow computations. Particle-based computations naturally adapt to complex flow geometries and so provide a high degree of computational efficiency. Also, particle based methods avoid CFL conditions because flow quantities are integrated along characteristics. There are many approaches to improving numerical methods, but one of the most effective routes is quantifying the error through the direct estimate of residual quantities. Understanding the residual for particle schemes requires a different approach than for meshless schemes but the rewards are significant. In this seminar, I will outline a general approach to understanding convergence that has been effective in creating high spatial accuracy vortex methods, and then I will discuss some recent investigations in the accuracy of diffusion operators used in SPH computations. Finally, I will provide some sample Navier-Stokes computations of high Reynolds number flows using BlobFlow, an open source implementation of the high precision vortex method.
Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
The mathematics of theoretical inference in cognitive psychology
15:10 Fri 11 Jun, 2010 :: Napier LG24 :: Prof John Dunn :: University of Adelaide

The aim of psychology in general, and of cognitive psychology in particular, is to construct theoretical accounts of mental processes based on observed changes in performance on one or more cognitive tasks. The fundamental problem faced by the researcher is that these mental processes are not directly observable but must be inferred from changes in performance between different experimental conditions. This inference is further complicated by the fact that performance measures may only be monotonically related to the underlying psychological constructs. State-trace analysis provides an approach to this problem which has gained increasing interest in recent years. In this talk, I explain state-trace analysis and discuss the set of mathematical issues that flow from it. Principal among these are the challenges of statistical inference and an unexpected connection to the mathematics of oriented matroids.
Electrified film flow over topography
15:10 Mon 5 Jul, 2010 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Mark Blyth :: University of East Anglia

Explicit numerical simulation of multiphase and confined flows
15:10 Fri 8 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Mark Biggs :: University of Adelaide

Simulations in which the system of interest is essentially mimicked are termed explicit numerical simulations (ENS). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence is a well known and long-standing example of ENS. Such simulations provide a basis for elucidating fundamentals in a way that is impossible experimentally and formulating and parameterizing engineering models with reduced experimentation. In this presentation, I will first outline the concept of ENS. I will then report a number of ENS-based studies of various multiphase fluid systems and flows in porous media. In the first of these studies, which is concerned with flow of suspensions in porous media accompanied by deposition, ENS is used to demonstrate the significant inadequacies of the classical trajectory models typically used for the study of such problems. In the second study, which is concerned with elucidating the change in binary droplet collision behaviour with Capillary number (Ca) and Reynolds number (Re), a range of collision scenarios are revealed as a function of Ca and Re and it appears that the boundaries between these scenarios in the Ca-Re space are not distinct but, rather, smeared. In the final study, it is shown that ENS an be used to predict ab initio the hydrodynamic properties of single phase flow through porous media from the Darcy to the turbulent regimes.
Slippery issues in nano- and microscale fluid flows
11:10 Tue 30 Nov, 2010 :: Innova teaching suite B21 :: Dr Shaun C. Hendy :: Victoria University of Wellington

The no-slip boundary condition was considered to have been experimentally established for the flow of simple liquids over solid surfaces in the early 20th century. Nonetheless the refinement of a number of measurement techniques has recently led to the observation of nano- and microscale violations of the no-slip boundary condition by simple fluids flowing over non-wetting surfaces. However it is important to distinguish between intrinsic slip, which arises solely from the chemical interaction between the liquid and a homogeneous, atomically flat surface and effective slip, typically measured in macroscopic experiments, which emerges from the interaction of microscopic chemical heterogeneity, roughness and contaminants. Here we consider the role of both intrinsic and effective slip boundary conditions in nanoscale and microscale fluid flows using a theoretical approach, complemented by molecular dynamics simulations, and experimental evidence where available. Firstly, we consider nanoscale flows in small capillaries, including carbon nanotubes, where we have developed and solved a generalised Lucas-Washburn equation that incorporates slip to describe the uptake of droplets. We then consider the general problem of relating effective slip to microscopic intrinsic slip and roughness, and discuss several cases where we have been able to solve this problem analytically. Finally, we look at applications of these results to carbon nanotube growth, self-cleaning surfaces, catalysis, and putting insulation in your roof.
Heat transfer scaling and emergence of three-dimensional flow in horizontal convection
15:10 Fri 25 Feb, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Greg Sheard :: Monash University

Horizontal convecton refers to flows driven by uneven heating on a horizontal forcing boundary. Flows exhibiting these characteristics are prevalent in nature, and include the North-South Hadley circulation within the atmosphere between warmer and more temperate latitudes, as well as ocean currents driven by non-uniform heating via solar radiation.

Here a model for these generic convection flows is established featuring a rectangular enclosure, insulated on the side and top walls, and driven by a linear temperature gradient applied along the bottom wall. Rayleigh number dependence of heat transfer through the forcing boundary is computed and compared with theory. Attention is given to transitions in the flow, including the development of unsteady flow and three-dimensional flow: the effect of these transitions on the Nusselt-Rayleigh number scaling exponents is described.

Heat transfer scaling and emergence of three-dimensional flow in horizontal convection
15:10 Fri 25 Mar, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Greg Sheard :: Monash University

The Extended-Domain-Eigenfunction Method: making old mathematics work for new problems
15:10 Fri 13 May, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Stan Miklavcic :: University of South Australia

Media...
Standard analytical solutions to elliptic boundary value problems on asymmetric domains are rarely, if ever, obtainable. Several years ago I proposed a solution technique to cope with such complicated domains. It involves the embedding of the original domain into one with simple boundaries where the classical eigenfunction solution approach can be used. The solution in the larger domain, when restricted to the original domain is then the solution of the original boundary value problem. In this talk I will present supporting theory for this idea, some numerical results for the particular case of the Laplace equation and the Stokes flow equations in two-dimensions and discuss advantages and limitations of the proposal.
Permeability of heterogeneous porous media - experiments, mathematics and computations
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2011 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Patrick Selvadurai :: Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University

Permeability is a key parameter important to a variety of applications in geological engineering and in the environmental geosciences. The conventional definition of Darcy flow enables the estimation of permeability at different levels of detail. This lecture will focus on the measurement of surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone, using a surface permeameter. The paper discusses the theoretical developments, the solution of the resulting triple integral equations and associated computational treatments that enable the mapping of the near surface permeability of the cuboidal region. This data combined with a kriging procedure is used to develop results for the permeability distribution at the interior of the cuboidal region. Upon verification of the absence of dominant pathways for fluid flow through the cuboidal region, estimates are obtained for the "Effective Permeability" of the cuboid using estimates proposed by Wiener, Landau and Lifschitz, King, Matheron, Journel et al., Dagan and others. The results of these estimates are compared with the geometric mean, derived form the computational estimates.
Priority queueing systems with random switchover times and generalisations of the Kendall-Takacs equation
16:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

In this talk I will review existing analytical results for priority queueing systems with Poisson incoming flows, general service times and a single server which needs some (random) time to switch between requests of different priority. Specifically, I will discuss analytical results for the busy period and workload of such systems with a special structure of switchover times. The results related to the busy period can be seen as generalisations of the famous Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs functional equation for $M|G|1$: being formulated in terms of Laplace-Stieltjes transform, they represent systems of functional recurrent equations. I will present a methodology and algorithms of their numerical solution; the efficiency of these algorithms is achieved by acceleration of the numerical procedure of solving the classical Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs equation. At the end I will identify open problems with regard to such systems; these open problems are mainly related to the modelling of switchover times.
Horocycle flows at prime times
13:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

The distribution of individual orbits of unipotent flows in homogeneous spaces are well understood thanks to the work work of Marina Ratner. It is conjectured that this property is preserved on restricting the times from the integers to primes, this being important in the study of prime numbers as well as in such dynamics. We review progress in understanding this conjecture, starting with Dirichlet (a finite system), Vinogradov (rotation of a circle or torus), Green and Tao (translation on a nilmanifold) and Ubis and Sarnak (horocycle flows in the semisimple case).
Boundaries of unsteady Lagrangian Coherent Structures
15:10 Wed 10 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: Connecticut College, USA and the University of Adelaide

For steady flows, the boundaries of Lagrangian Coherent Structures are segments of manifolds connected to fixed points. In the general unsteady situation, these boundaries are time-varying manifolds of hyperbolic trajectories. Locating these boundaries, and attempting to meaningfully quantify fluid flux across them, is difficult since they are moving with time. This talk uses a newly developed tangential movement theory to locate these boundaries in nearly-steady compressible flows.
Blood flow in the coiled umbilical cord
12:10 Mon 22 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

The umbilical cord is the connecting cord between the developing embryo or fetus and the placenta. In a normal pregnancy it facilitates the supply of oxygen and nutrients from the placenta, in addition to the return of deoxygenated blood from the fetus. One of the most striking features of the umbilical cord is it's coiled structure, which allows the vasculature to withstand tensile and compressive forces in utero. The level of coiling also has a significant effect on the blood flow and cords exhibiting abnormally high or low levels are known to correlate well with adverse outcomes in pregancy, including fetal demise. In this talk I will discuss the complexities associated with numerically modeling blood flow within the umbilical cord, and provide an outline of the key features which will be investigated throughout my research.
T-duality via bundle gerbes I
13:10 Fri 23 Sep, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
T-duality via bundle gerbes II
13:10 Fri 21 Oct, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

In physics T-duality is a phenomenon which relates certain types of string theories to one another. From a topological point of view, one can view string theory as a duality between line bundles carrying a degree three cohomology class (the H-flux). In this talk we will use bundle gerbes to give a geometric realisation of the H-flux and explain how to construct the T-dual of a line bundle together with its T-dual bundle gerbe.
Stability analysis of nonparallel unsteady flows via separation of variables
15:30 Fri 18 Nov, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Georgy Burde :: Ben-Gurion University

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The problem of variables separation in the linear stability equations, which govern the disturbance behavior in viscous incompressible fluid flows, is discussed. Stability of some unsteady nonparallel three-dimensional flows (exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations) is studied via separation of variables using a semi-analytical, semi-numerical approach. In this approach, a solution with separated variables is defined in a new coordinate system which is sought together with the solution form. As the result, the linear stability problems are reduced to eigenvalue problems for ordinary differential equations which can be solved numerically. In some specific cases, the eigenvalue problems can be solved analytically. Those unique examples of exact (explicit) solution of the nonparallel unsteady flow stability problems provide a very useful test for methods used in the hydrodynamic stability theory. Exact solutions of the stability problems for some stagnation-type flows are presented.
Fluid flows in microstructured optical fibre fabrication
15:10 Fri 25 Nov, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

Optical fibres are used extensively in modern telecommunications as they allow the transmission of information at high speeds. Microstructured optical fibres are a relatively new fibre design in which a waveguide for light is created by a series of air channels running along the length of the material. The flexibility of this design allows optical fibres to be created with adaptable (and previously unrealised) optical properties. However, the fluid flows that arise during fabrication can greatly distort the geometry, which can reduce the effectiveness of a fibre or render it useless. I will present an overview of the manufacturing process and highlight the difficulties. I will then focus on surface-tension driven deformation of the macroscopic version of the fibre extruded from a reservoir of molten glass, occurring during fabrication, which will be treated as a two-dimensional Stokes flow problem. I will outline two different complex-variable numerical techniques for solving this problem along with comparisons of the results, both to other models and to experimental data.
Collision and instability in a rotating fluid-filled torus
15:10 Mon 12 Dec, 2011 :: Benham Lecture Theatre :: Dr Richard Clarke :: The University of Auckland

The simple experiment discussed in this talk, first conceived by Madden and Mullin (JFM, 1994) as part of their investigations into the non-uniqueness of decaying turbulent flow, consists of a fluid-filled torus which is rotated in an horizontal plane. Turbulence within the contained flow is triggered through a rapid change in its rotation rate. The flow instabilities which transition the flow to this turbulent state, however, are truly fascinating in their own right, and form the subject of this presentation. Flow features observed in both UK- and Auckland-based experiments will be highlighted, and explained through both boundary-layer analysis and full DNS. In concluding we argue that this flow regime, with its compact geometry and lack of cumbersome flow entry effects, presents an ideal regime in which to study many prototype flow behaviours, very much in the same spirit as Taylor-Couette flow.
Fluid mechanics: what's maths got to do with it?
13:10 Tue 20 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Jim Denier :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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We've all heard about the grand challenges in mathematics. There was the Poincare Conjecture, which has now been resolved. There is the Riemann Hypothesis which many are seeking to prove. But one of the most intriguing is the so called "Navier-Stokes Equations" problem, intriguing because it not only involves some wickedly difficult mathematics but also involves questions about our deep understanding of nature as encountered in the flow of fluids. This talk will introduce the problem (without the wickedly difficult mathematics) and discuss some of the consequences of its resolution.
Fast-track study of viscous flow over topography using 'Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics'
12:10 Mon 16 Apr, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

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Motivated by certain tea room discussions, I am going to (attempt to) model the flow of a viscous fluid under gravity over conical topography. The method used is 'Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics' (SPH), which is an easy-to-use but perhaps limited-accuracy computational method. The model could be extended to include solidification and thermodynamic effects that can also be implemented within the framework of SPH, and this has the obvious practical application to the modelling of the coverage of ice cream with ice magic, I mean, lava flows. If I fail to achieve this within the next 4 weeks, I will have to go through a talk on SPH that I gave during honours instead.
Spatial-point data sets and the Polya distribution
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Benjamin Binder :: The University of Adelaide

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Spatial-point data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems and mathematical models, can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in equally sized bins. We find that the bin counts are related to the Polya distribution. New indexes are developed which quantify whether or not a spatial data set is at its most evenly distributed state. Using three case studies (Lagrangian fluid particles in chaotic laminar flows, cellular automata agents in discrete models, and biological cells within colonies), we calculate the indexes and predict the spatial-state of the system.
Model turbulent floods based upon the Smagorinski large eddy closure
12:10 Mon 4 Jun, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Meng Cao :: University of Adelaide

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Rivers, floods and tsunamis are often very turbulent. Conventional models of such environmental fluids are typically based on depth-averaged inviscid irrotational flow equations. We explore changing such a base to the turbulent Smagorinski large eddy closure. The aim is to more appropriately model the fluid dynamics of such complex environmental fluids by using such a turbulent closure. Large changes in fluid depth are allowed. Computer algebra constructs the slow manifold of the flow in terms of the fluid depth h and the mean turbulent lateral velocities u and v. The major challenge is to deal with the nonlinear stress tensor in the Smagorinski closure. The model integrates the effects of inertia, self-advection, bed drag, gravitational forcing and turbulent dissipation with minimal assumptions. Although the resultant model is close to established models, the real outcome is creating a sound basis for the modelling so others, in their modelling of more complex situations, can systematically include more complex physical processes.
K-theory and unbounded Fredholm operators
13:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Jerry Kaminker :: University of California, Davis

There are several ways of viewing elements of K^1(X). One of these is via families of unbounded self-adjoint Fredholm operators on X. Each operator will have discrete spectrum, with infinitely many positive and negative eigenvalues of finite multiplicity. One can associate to such a family a geometric object, its graph, and the Chern character and other invariants of the family can be studied from this perspective. By restricting the dimension of the eigenspaces one may sometimes use algebraic topology to completely determine the family up to equivalence. This talk will describe the general framework and some applications to families on low-dimensional manifolds where the methods work well. Various notions related to spectral flow, the index gerbe and Berry phase play roles which will be discussed. This is joint work with Ron Douglas.
Continuous random walk models for solute transport in porous media
15:10 Fri 17 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Pavel Bedrikovetski :: The University of Adelaide

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The classical diffusion (thermal conductivity) equation was derived from the Master random walk equation and is parabolic. The main assumption was a probabilistic distribution of the jump length while the jump time is constant. Distribution of the jump time along with the jump length adds the second time derivative into the averaged equations, but the equation becomes ... elliptic! Where from to take an extra initial condition? We discuss how to pose the well-posed flow problem, exact 1d solution and numerous engineering applications. This is joint work with A. Shapiro and H. Yuan.
Krylov Subspace Methods or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love GMRes
12:10 Mon 17 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

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Many problems within applied mathematics require the solution of a linear system of equations. For instance, models of arterial umbilical blood flow are obtained through a finite element approximation, resulting in a linear, n x n system. For small systems the solution is (almost) trivial, but what happens when n is large? Say, n ~ 10^6? In this case matrix inversion is expensive (read: completely impractical) and we seek approximate solutions in a reasonable time. In this talk I will discuss the basic theory underlying Krylov subspace methods; a class of non-stationary iterative methods which are currently the methods-of-choice for large, sparse, linear systems. In particular I will focus on the method of Generalised Minimum RESiduals (GMRes), which is of the most popular for nonsymmetric systems. It is hoped that through this presentation I will convince you that a) solving linear systems is not necessarily trivial, and that b) my lack of any tangible results is not (entirely) a result of my own incompetence.
The advection-diffusion-reaction equation on the surface of the sphere
12:10 Mon 24 Sep, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Kale Davies :: University of Adelaide

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We aim to solve the advection-diffusion-reaction equation on the surface of a sphere. In order to do this we will be required to utilise spherical harmonics, a set of solutions to Laplace's equation in spherical coordinates. Upon solving the equations, we aim to find a set of parameters that cause a localised concentration to be maintained in the flow, referred to as a hotspot. In this talk I will discuss the techniques that are required to numerically solve this problem and the issues that occur/how to deal with these issues when searching for hotspot solutions.
Turbulent flows, semtex, and rainbows
12:10 Mon 8 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Sophie Calabretto :: University of Adelaide

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The analysis of turbulence in transient flows has applications across a broad range of fields. We use the flow of fluid in a toroidal container as a paradigm for studying the complex dynamics due to this turbulence. To explore the dynamics of our system, we exploit the numerical capabilities of semtex; a quadrilateral spectral element DNS code. Rainbows result.
Complex analysis in low Reynolds number hydrodynamics
15:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Darren Crowdy :: Imperial College London

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It is a well-known fact that the methods of complex analysis provide great advantage in studying physical problems involving a harmonic field satisfying Laplace's equation. One example is in ideal fluid mechanics (infinite Reynolds number) where the absence of viscosity, and the assumption of zero vorticity, mean that it is possible to introduce a so-called complex potential -- an analytic function from which all physical quantities of interest can be inferred. In the opposite limit of zero Reynolds number flows which are slow and viscous and the governing fields are not harmonic it is much less common to employ the methods of complex analysis even though they continue to be relevant in certain circumstances. This talk will give an overview of a variety of problems involving slow viscous Stokes flows where complex analysis can be usefully employed to gain theoretical insights. A number of example problems will be considered including the locomotion of low-Reynolds-number micro-organisms and micro-robots, the friction properties of superhydrophobic surfaces in microfluidics and problems of viscous sintering and the manufacture of microstructured optic fibres (MOFs).
Thin-film flow in helically-wound channels with small torsion
15:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

The study of flow in open helically-wound channels has application to many natural and industrial flows. We will consider laminar flow down helically-wound channels of rectangular cross section and with small torsion, in which the fluid depth is small. Assuming a steady-state flow that is independent of position along the axis of the channel, the flow solution may be determined in the two-dimensional cross section of the channel. A thin-film approximation yields explicit expressions for the fluid velocity in terms of the free-surface shape. The latter satisfies an interesting non-linear ordinary differential equation that, for a channel of rectangular cross section, has an analytical solution. The predictions of the thin-film model are shown to be in good agreement with much more computationally intensive solutions of the small-helix-torsion Navier-Stokes equations. This work has particular relevance to spiral particle separators used in the minerals processing industry. Early work on modelling of particle-laden thin-film flow in spiral channels will also be discussed.
Thin-film flow in helically-wound channels with small torsion
15:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Yvonne Stokes :: University of Adelaide

The study of flow in open helically-wound channels has application to many natural and industrial flows. We will consider laminar flow down helically-wound channels of rectangular cross section and with small torsion, in which the fluid depth is small. Assuming a steady-state flow that is independent of position along the axis of the channel, the flow solution may be determined in the two-dimensional cross section of the channel. A thin-film approximation yields explicit expressions for the fluid velocity in terms of the free-surface shape. The latter satisfies an interesting non-linear ordinary differential equation that, for a channel of rectangular cross section, has an analytical solution. The predictions of the thin-film model are shown to be in good agreement with much more computationally intensive solutions of the small-helix-torsion Navier-Stokes equations. This work has particular relevance to spiral particle separators used in the minerals processing industry. Early work on modelling of particle-laden thin-film flow in spiral channels will also be discussed.
Dynamics of microbial populations from a copper sulphide leaching heap
12:30 Mon 12 Nov, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Susana Soto Rojo :: University of Adelaide

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We are interested in the dynamics of the microbial population from a copper sulphide bioleaching heap. The composition of the microbial consortium is closely related to the kinetics of the oxidation processes that lead to copper recovery. Using a non-linear model, which considers the effect of substrate depletion and incorporates spatial dependence, we analyse adjacent strips correlation, patterns of microbial succession, relevance of pertinent physic-chemical parameters and the implications of the absence of barriers between the three lifts of the heap. We also explore how the dynamics of the microbial community relate to the mineral composition of the individual strips of the bioleaching pile.
Progress in the prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence
15:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Daniel Chung :: University of Melbourne

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Buoyancy-affected turbulence represents a significant challenge to our understanding, yet it dominates many important flows that occur in the ocean and atmosphere. The presentation will highlight some recent progress in the characterisation, modelling and prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence using direct and large-eddy simulations, along with implications for the characterisation of mixing in the ocean and the low-cloud feedback in the atmosphere. Specifically, direct numerical simulation data of stratified turbulence will be employed to highlight the importance of boundaries in the characterisation of turbulent mixing in the ocean. Then, a subgrid-scale model that captures the anisotropic character of stratified mixing will be developed for large-eddy simulation of buoyancy-affected turbulence. Finally, the subgrid-scale model is utilised to perform a systematic large-eddy simulation investigation of the archetypal low-cloud regimes, from which the link between the lower-tropospheric stability criterion and the cloud fraction interpreted.
Pulsatile Flow
12:10 Mon 20 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

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Blood flow within the human arterial system is inherently unsteady as a consequence of the pulsations of the heart. The unsteady nature of the flow gives rise to a number of important flow features which may be critical in understanding pathologies of the cardiovascular system. For example, it is believed that large oscillations in wall shear stress may enhance the effects of artherosclerosis, among other pathologies. In this talk I will present some of the basic concepts of pulsatile flow and follow the analysis first performed by J.R. Womersley in his seminal 1955 paper.
Shannon entropy as a diagnostic tool for PDEs in conservation form
15:10 Fri 16 Aug, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Philip Broadbridge :: La Trobe University

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After normalization, an evolving real non-negative function may be viewed as a probability density. From this we may derive the corresponding evolution law for Shannon entropy. Parabolic equations, hyperbolic equations and fourth-order diffusion equations evolve information in quite different ways. Entropy and irreversibility can be introduced in a self-consistent manner and at an elementary level by reference to some simple evolution equations such as the linear heat equation. It is easily seen that the 2nd law of thermodynamics is equivalent to loss of Shannon information when temperature obeys a general nonlinear 2nd order diffusion equation. With fourth order diffusion terms, new problems arise. We know from applications such as thin film flow and surface diffusion, that fourth order diffusion terms may generate ripples and they do not satisfy the Second Law. Despite this, we can identify the class of fourth order quasilinear diffusion equations that increase the Shannon entropy.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 23 Aug, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Barry Cox, Professor Tony Roberts & Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

Talk: Dr Barry Cox - 'Conformation space of seven-member rings'. Work in progress discussion: Professor Tony Roberts - Macroscale PDEs emerge from microscale dynamics with quantified errors Stephen Wade - Trapped waves in flow past a trench
Thin-film flow in helical channels
12:10 Mon 9 Sep, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Arnold :: University of Adelaide

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Spiral particle separators are used in the mineral processing industry to refine ores. A slurry, formed by mixing crushed ore with a fluid, is run down a helical channel and at the end of the channel, the particles end up sorted in different sections of the channel. Design of such devices is largely experimentally based, and mathematical modelling of flow in helical channels is relatively limited. In this talk, I will outline some of the work that I have been doing on thin-film flow in helical channels.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 13 Sep, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya and Dr Michael Chen :: University of Adelaide

Talks: Nonautonomous control of invariant manifolds - Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: Interface problems in viscous flow - Dr Michael Chen
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 25 Oct, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Ben Binder and Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

Dr Ben Binder :: 'An inverse approach for solutions to free-surface flow problems' :: Abstract: Surface water waves are familiar to most people, for example, the wave pattern generated at the stern of a ship. The boundary or interface between the air and water is called the free-surface. When determining a solution to a free-surface flow problem it is commonplace for the forcing (eg. shape of ship or waterbed topography) that creates the surface waves to be prescribed, with the free-surface coming as part of the solution. Alternatively, one can choose to prescribe the shape of the free-surface and find the forcing inversely. In this talk I will discuss my ongoing work using an inverse approach to discover new types of solutions to free-surface flow problems in two and three dimensions, and how the predictions of the method might be verified with experiments. :: Mr David Wilke:: 'A Computational Fluid Dynamic Study of Blood Flow Within the Coiled Umbilical Arteries':: Abstract: The umbilical cord is the lifeline of the fetus throughout gestation. In a normal pregnancy it facilitates the supply of oxygen and nutrients from the placenta via a single vein, in addition to the return of deoxygenated blood from the developing embryo or fetus via two umbilical arteries. Despite the major role it plays in the growth of the fetus, pathologies of the umbilical cord are poorly understood. In particular, variations in the cord geometry, which typically forms a helical arrangement, have been correlated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Cords exhibiting either abnormally low or high levels of coiling have been associated with pathological results including growth-restriction and fetal demise. Despite this, the methodology currently employed by clinicians to characterise umbilical pathologies can misdiagnose cords and is prone to error. In this talk a computational model of blood flow within rigid three-dimensional structures representative of the umbilical arteries will be presented. This study determined that the current characterization was unable to differentiate between cords which exhibited clinically distinguishable flow properties, including the cord pressure drop, which provides a measure of the loading on the fetal heart.
A gentle introduction to bubble evolution in Hele-Shaw flows
15:10 Fri 22 Nov, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Scott McCue :: QUT

A Hele-Shaw cell is easy to make and serves as a fun toy for an applied mathematician to play with. If we inject air into a Hele-Shaw cell that is otherwise filled with viscous fluid, we can observe a bubble of air growing in size. The process is highly unstable, and the bubble boundary expands in an uneven fashion, leading to striking fingering patterns (look up Hele-Shaw cell or Saffman-Taylor instability on YouTube). From a mathematical perspective, modelling these Hele-Shaw flows is interesting because the governing equations are sufficiently ``simple'' that a considerable amount of analytical progress is possible. Indeed, there is no other context in which (genuinely) two-dimensional moving boundary problems are so tractable. More generally, Hele-Shaw flows are important as they serve as prototypes for more complicated (and important) physical processes such as crystal growth and diffusion limited aggregation. I will give an introduction to some of the main ideas and summarise some of my present research in this area.
Buoyancy driven exchange flows in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs
15:10 Mon 2 Dec, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Professor John Patterson :: University of Sydney

Natural convection is the flow driven by differences in density, and is ubiquitous in nature and industry. It is the source of most environmental flows, and is the basis for almost all industrial heat exchange processes. It operates on both massive and micro scales. It is usually considered as a flow driven by temperature gradients, but could equally be from a gradient in any density determining property - salinity is one obvious example. It also depends on gravity; so magnetohydrodynamics becomes relevant as well. One particular interesting and environmentally relevant flow is the exchange flow in the nearshore regions of lakes and reservoirs. This occurs because of the effects of a decreasing depth approaching the shore resulting laterally unequal heat loss and heat gain during the diurnal cooling and heating cycle. This presentation will discuss some of the results obtained by the Natural Convection Group at Sydney University in analytical, numerical and experimental investigations of this mechanism, and the implications for lake water quality.
The density property for complex manifolds: a strong form of holomorphic flexibility
12:10 Fri 24 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

Compared with the real differentiable case, complex manifolds in general are more rigid, their groups of holomorphic diffeomorphisms are rather small (in general trivial). A long known exception to this behavior is affine n-space C^n for n at least 2. Its group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is infinite dimensional. In the late 1980s Andersen and Lempert proved a remarkable theorem which stated in its generalized version due to Forstneric and Rosay that any local holomorphic phase flow given on a Runge subset of C^n can be locally uniformly approximated by a global holomorphic diffeomorphism. The main ingredient in the proof was formalized by Varolin and called the density property: The Lie algebra generated by complete holomorphic vector fields is dense in the Lie algebra of all holomorphic vector fields. In these manifolds a similar local to global approximation of Andersen-Lempert type holds. It is a precise way of saying that the group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is large. In the talk we will explain how this notion is related to other more recent flexibility notions in complex geometry, in particular to the notion of a Oka-Forstneric manifold. We will give examples of manifolds with the density property and sketch applications of the density property. If time permits we will explain criteria for the density property developed by Kaliman and the speaker.
Dynamical systems approach to fluid-plasma turbulence
15:10 Fri 14 Mar, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Abraham Chian

Sun-Earth system is a complex, electrodynamically coupled system dominated by multiscale interactions. The complex behavior of the space environment is indicative of a state driven far from equilibrium whereby instabilities, nonlinear waves, and turbulence play key roles in the system dynamics. First, we review the fundamental concepts of nonlinear dynamics in fluids and plasmas and discuss their relevance to the study of the Sun-Earth relation. Next, we show how Lagrangian coherent structures identify the transport barriers of plasma turbulence modeled by 3-D solar convective dynamo. Finally, we show how Lagrangian coherent structures can be detected in the solar photospheric turbulence using satellite observations.
Viscoelastic fluids: mathematical challenges in determining their relaxation spectra
15:10 Mon 17 Mar, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Russell Davies :: Cardiff University

Determining the relaxation spectrum of a viscoelastic fluid is a crucial step before a linear or nonlinear constitutive model can be applied. Information about the relaxation spectrum is obtained from simple flow experiments such as creep or oscillatory shear. However, the determination process involves the solution of one or more highly ill-posed inverse problems. The availability of only discrete data, the presence of noise in the data, as well as incomplete data, collectively make the problem very hard to solve. In this talk I will illustrate the mathematical challenges inherent in determining relaxation spectra, and also introduce the method of wavelet regularization which enables the representation of a continuous relaxation spectrum by a set of hyperbolic scaling functions.
Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows
15:10 Fri 4 Apr, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: The University of Adelaide

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How does one define the boundary of the ozone hole, an oceanic eddy, or Jupiter's Great Red Spot? These occur in flows which are unsteady (nonautonomous), that is, which change with time, and therefore any boundary must as well. In steady (autonomous) flows, defining flow boundaries is straightforward: one first finds fixed points of the flow, and then determines entities in space which are attracted to or repelled from these points as time progresses. These are respectively the stable and unstable manifolds of the fixed points, and can be shown to partition space into regions of different types of flow. This talk will focus on the required modifications to this idea for determining flow barriers in the more realistic unsteady context. An application to maximising mixing in microfluidic devices will also be presented.
CARRYING CAPACITY FOR FINFISH AQUACULTURE IN SPENCER GULF: RAPID ASSESSMENT USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND NEAR-FIELD, SEMI - ANALYTIC SOLUTIONS
15:10 Fri 11 Apr, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Professor John Middleton :: SARDI Aquatic Sciences and University of Adelaide

Aquaculture farming involves daily feeding of finfish and a subsequent excretion of nutrients into Spencer Gulf. Typically, finfish farming is done in six or so 50m diameter cages and over 600m X 600m lease sites. To help regulate the industry, it is desired that the finfish feed rates and the associated nutrient flux into the ocean are determined such that the maximum nutrient concentration c does not exceed a prescribed value (say cP) for ecosystem health. The prescribed value cP is determined by guidelines from the E.P.A. The concept is known as carrying capacity since limiting the feed rates limits the biomass of the farmed finfish. Here, we model the concentrations that arise from a constant input flux (F) of nutrients in a source region (the cage or lease) using the (depth-averaged) two dimensional, advection diffusion equation for constant and sinusoidal (tides) currents. Application of the divergence theorem to this equation results in a new scale estimate of the maximum flux F (and thus feed rate) that is given by F= cP /T* (1) where cP is the maximum allowed concentration and T* is a new time scale of “flushing” that involves both advection and diffusion. The scale estimate (1) is then shown to compare favourably with mathematically exact solutions of the advection diffusion equation that are obtained using Green’s functions and Fourier transforms. The maximum nutrient flux and associated feed rates are then estimated everywhere in Spencer Gulf through the development and validation of a hydrodynamic model. The model provides seasonal averages of the mean currents U and horizontal diffusivities KS that are needed to estimate T*. The diffusivities are estimated from a shear dispersal model of the tides which are very large in the gulf. The estimates have been provided to PIRSA Fisheries and Aquaculture to assist in the sustainable expansion of finfish aquaculture.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 6 Jun, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Meng Cao and Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

Meng Cao:: Multiscale modelling couples patches of nonlinear wave-like simulations :: Abstract: The multiscale gap-tooth scheme is built from given microscale simulations of complicated physical processes to empower macroscale simulations. By coupling small patches of simulations over unsimulated physical gaps, large savings in computational time are possible. So far the gap-tooth scheme has been developed for dissipative systems, but wave systems are also of great interest. This article develops the gap-tooth scheme to the case of nonlinear microscale simulations of wave-like systems. Classic macroscale interpolation provides a generic coupling between patches that achieves arbitrarily high order consistency between the multiscale scheme and the underlying microscale dynamics. Eigen-analysis indicates that the resultant gap-tooth scheme empowers feasible computation of large scale simulations of wave-like dynamics with complicated underlying physics. As an pilot study, we implement numerical simulations of dam-breaking waves by the gap-tooth scheme. Comparison between a gap-tooth simulation, a microscale simulation over the whole domain, and some published experimental data on dam breaking, demonstrates that the gap-tooth scheme feasibly computes large scale wave-like dynamics with computational savings. Trent Mattner :: Coupled atmosphere-fire simulations of the Canberra 2003 bushfires using WRF-Sfire :: Abstract: The Canberra fires of January 18, 2003 are notorious for the extreme fire behaviour and fire-atmosphere-topography interactions that occurred, including lee-slope fire channelling, pyrocumulonimbus development and tornado formation. In this talk, I will discuss coupled fire-weather simulations of the Canberra fires using WRF-SFire. In these simulations, a fire-behaviour model is used to dynamically predict the evolution of the fire front according to local atmospheric and topographic conditions, as well as the associated heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. It is found that the predicted fire front and heat flux is not too bad, bearing in mind the complexity of the problem and the severe modelling assumptions made. However, the predicted moisture flux is too low, which has some impact on atmospheric dynamics.
Estimates for eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on compact Riemannian manifolds
12:10 Fri 1 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Andrew Hassell :: Australian National University

I am interested in estimates on eigenfunctions, accurate in the high-eigenvalue limit. I will discuss estimates on the size (as measured by L^p norms) of eigenfunctions, on the whole Riemannian manifold, at the boundary, or at an interior hypersurface. The link between high-eigenvalue estimates, geometry, and the dynamics of geodesic flow will be emphasized.
Boundary-value problems for the Ricci flow
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Artem Pulemotov :: The University of Queensland

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The Ricci flow is a differential equation describing the evolution of a Riemannian manifold (i.e., a "curved" geometric object) into an Einstein manifold (i.e., an object with a "constant" curvature). This equation is particularly famous for its key role in the proof of the Poincare Conjecture. Understanding the Ricci flow on manifolds with boundary is a difficult problem with applications to a variety of fields, such as topology and mathematical physics. The talk will survey the current progress towards the resolution of this problem. In particular, we will discuss new results concerning spaces with symmetries.
Translating solitons for mean curvature flow
12:10 Fri 19 Sep, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Julie Clutterbuck :: Monash University

Mean curvature flow gives a deformation of a submanifold in the direction of its mean curvature vector. Singularities may arise, and can be modelled by special solutions of the flow. I will describe the special solutions that move by only a translation under the flow, and give some explicit constructions of such surfaces. This is based on joint work with Oliver Schnuerer and Felix Schulze.
Micro Magnetofluidics - Wireless Manipulation for Microfluidics
15:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: N.132 Engineering North :: Professor Nam-Trung Nguyen :: Griffith University

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Microfluidics is rich in multi-physics phenomena, which offer fundamentally new capabilities in the manipulation and detection of biological particles. Most current microfluidic applications are based on hydrodynamic, electrokinetic, acoustic and optic actuation. Implementing these concepts requires bulky external pumping/valving systems and energy supplies. The required wires and connectors make their fabrication and handling difficult. Most of the conventional approaches induce heat that may affect sensitive bio particles such as cells. There is a need for a technology for fluid handling in microfluidic devices that is of low-cost, simple, wireless, free of induced heat and independent of pH level or ion concentration. The use of magnetism would provide a wireless solution for this need. Micro magnetofluidics is a newly established research field that links magnetism and microfluidics to gain new capabilities. Magnetism provides a convenient and wireless way for control and manipulation of fluid flow in the microscale. Investigation of magnetism-induced phenomena in a microfluidic device has the advantage of well-defined experimental condition such as temperature and magnetic field because of the system size. This talk presents recent interesting phenomena in both continuous-flow and digital micro magnetofluidics.
Happiness and social information flow: Computational social science through data.
15:10 Fri 7 Nov, 2014 :: EM G06 (Engineering & Maths Bldg) :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: University of Adelaide

The recent explosion in big data coming from online social networks has led to an increasing interest in bringing quantitative methods to bear on questions in social science. A recent high-profile example is the study of emotional contagion, which has led to significant challenges and controversy. This talk will focus on two issues related to emotional contagion, namely remote-sensing of population-level wellbeing and the problem of information flow across a social network. We discuss some of the challenges in working with massive online data sets, and present a simple tool for measuring large-scale happiness from such data. By combining over 10 million geolocated messages collected from Twitter with traditional census data we uncover geographies of happiness at the scale of states and cities, and discuss how these patterns may be related to traditional wellbeing measures and public health outcomes. Using tools from information theory we also study information flow between individuals and how this may relate to the concept of predictability for human behaviour.
Happiness and social information flow: Computational social science through data.
15:10 Fri 7 Nov, 2014 :: EM G06 (Engineering & Maths Bldg) :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: University of Adelaide

The recent explosion in big data coming from online social networks has led to an increasing interest in bringing quantitative methods to bear on questions in social science. A recent high-profile example is the study of emotional contagion, which has led to significant challenges and controversy. This talk will focus on two issues related to emotional contagion, namely remote-sensing of population-level wellbeing and the problem of information flow across a social network. We discuss some of the challenges in working with massive online data sets, and present a simple tool for measuring large-scale happiness from such data. By combining over 10 million geolocated messages collected from Twitter with traditional census data we uncover geographies of happiness at the scale of states and cities, and discuss how these patterns may be related to traditional wellbeing measures and public health outcomes. Using tools from information theory we also study information flow between individuals and how this may relate to the concept of predictability for human behaviour.
Boundary behaviour of Hitchin and hypo flows with left-invariant initial data
12:10 Fri 27 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Vicente Cortes :: University of Hamburg

Hitchin and hypo flows constitute a system of first order pdes for the construction of Ricci-flat Riemannian mertrics of special holonomy in dimensions 6, 7 and 8. Assuming that the initial geometric structure is left-invariant, we study whether the resulting Ricci-flat manifolds can be extended in a natural way to complete Ricci-flat manifolds. This talk is based on joint work with Florin Belgun, Marco Freibert and Oliver Goertsches, see arXiv:1405.1866 (math.DG).
Spherical T-duality: the non-principal case
12:10 Fri 1 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Spherical T-duality is related to M-theory and was introduced in recent joint work with Bouwknegt and Evslin. I will begin by briefly reviewing the case of principal SU(2)-bundles with degree 7 flux, and then focus on the non-principal case for most of the talk, ending with the relation to SUGRA/M-theory.
Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Active Suspensions
14:10 Mon 3 Aug, 2015 :: Napier 209 :: Professor Michael Shelley :: Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University

Complex fluids that have a 'bio-active' microstructure, like suspensions of swimming bacteria or assemblies of immersed biopolymers and motor-proteins, are important examples of so-called active matter. These internally driven fluids can have strange mechanical properties, and show persistent activity-driven flows and self-organization. I will show how first-principles PDE models are derived through reciprocal coupling of the 'active stresses' generated by collective microscopic activity to the fluid's macroscopic flows. These PDEs have an interesting analytic structures and dynamics that agree qualitatively with experimental observations: they predict the transitions to flow instability and persistent mixing observed in bacterial suspensions, and for microtubule assemblies show the generation, propagation, and annihilation of disclination defects. I'll discuss how these models might be used to study yet more complex biophysical systems.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
Hot tube tau machine
15:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2016 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

Abstract: Microstructured optical fibres may be fabricated by first extruding molten material from a die to produce a macroscopic version of the final design, call a preform, and then stretching this to produce a fibre. In this talk I will demonstrate how to couple an existing model of the fluid flow during the extrusion stage to a basic model of the fluid temperature and present some preliminary conclusions. This work is still in progress and is being carried out in collaboration with Yvonne Stokes, Michael Chen and Jonathan Wylie. (+ Any items for group discussion)
Some free boundary value problems in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows
12:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Valentina Wheeler :: University of Wollongong

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In this talk we present an overview of the current research in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows with free boundaries, with particular focus on our own results. Firstly we consider the scenario of a mean curvature flow solution with a ninety-degree angle condition on a fixed hypersurface in Euclidean space, that we call the contact hypersurface. We prove that under restrictions on either the initial hypersurface (such as rotational symmetry) or restrictions on the contact hypersurface the flow exists for all times and converges to a self-similar solution. We also discuss the possibility of a curvature singularity appearing on the free boundary contained in the contact hypersurface. We extend some of these results to the setting of a hypersurface evolving in its normal direction with speed given by a fully nonlinear functional of the principal curvatures.
Multi-scale modeling in biofluids and particle aggregation
15:10 Fri 17 Jun, 2016 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sarthok Sircar :: University of Adelaide

In today's seminar I will give 2 examples in mathematical biology which describes the multi-scale organization at 2 levels: the meso/micro level and the continuum/macro level. I will then detail suitable tools in statistical mechanics to link these different scales. The first problem arises in mathematical physiology: swelling-de-swelling mechanism of mucus, an ionic gel. Mucus is packaged inside cells at high concentration (volume fraction) and when released into the extracellular environment, it expands in volume by two orders of magnitude in a matter of seconds. This rapid expansion is due to the rapid exchange of calcium and sodium that changes the cross-linked structure of the mucus polymers, thereby causing it to swell. Modeling this problem involves a two-phase, polymer/solvent mixture theory (in the continuum level description), together with the chemistry of the polymer, its nearest neighbor interaction and its binding with the dissolved ionic species (in the micro-scale description). The problem is posed as a free-boundary problem, with the boundary conditions derived from a combination of variational principle and perturbation analysis. The dynamics of neutral gels and the equilibrium-states of the ionic gels are analyzed. In the second example, we numerically study the adhesion fragmentation dynamics of rigid, round particles clusters subject to a homogeneous shear flow. In the macro level we describe the dynamics of the number density of these cluster. The description in the micro-scale includes (a) binding/unbinding of the bonds attached on the particle surface, (b) bond torsion, (c) surface potential due to ionic medium, and (d) flow hydrodynamics due to shear flow.
Predicting turbulence
14:10 Tue 30 Aug, 2016 :: Napier 209 :: Dr Trent Mattner :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Turbulence is characterised by three-dimensional unsteady fluid motion over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. It is important in many problems of technological and scientific interest, such as drag reduction, energy production and climate prediction. Turbulent flows are governed by the Navier--Stokes equations, which are a nonlinear system of partial differential equations. Typically, numerical methods are needed to find solutions to these equations. In turbulent flows, however, the resulting computational problem is usually intractable. Filtering or averaging the Navier--Stokes equations mitigates the computational problem, but introduces new quantities into the equations. Mathematical models of turbulence are needed to estimate these quantities. One promising turbulence model consists of a random collection of fluid vortices, which are themselves approximate solutions of the Navier--Stokes equations.
Some results on the stability of flat Stokes layers
15:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Professor Andrew Bassom :: University of Tasmania

The flat Stokes layer is one of the relatively few exact solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. For that reason the temporal stability of the layer has attracted considerable interest over the years. Fortunately, not only is the issue one solely of academic curiosity, but some kind of Stokes layer is likely to be set up at the boundaries of any physical time-periodic flow making its stability of practical interest as well. In this talk I shall review progress made in the understanding of the linear stability properties of the flow. In particular I will discuss the fact that theoretical predictions of critical conditions are wildly different from those observed in the laboratory.
Segregation of particles in incompressible flows due to streamline topology and particle-boundary interaction
15:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Professor Hendrik C. Kuhlmann :: Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria

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The incompressible flow in a number of classical benchmark problems (e.g. lid-driven cavity, liquid bridge) undergoes an instability from a two-dimensional steady to a periodic three-dimensional flow, which is steady or in form of a traveling wave, if the Reynolds number is increased. In the supercritical regime chaotic as well as regular (quasi-periodic) streamlines can coexist for a range of Reynolds numbers. The spatial structures of the regular regions in three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows has received relatively little attention, partly because of the high numerical effort required for resolving these structures. Particles whose density does not differ much from that of the liquid approximately follow the chaotic or regular streamlines in the bulk. Near the boundaries, however, their trajectories strongly deviate from the streamlines, in particular if the boundary (wall or free surface) is moving tangentially. As a result of this particle-boundary interaction particles can rapidly segregate and be attracted to periodic or quasi-periodic orbits, yielding particle accumulation structures (PAS). The mechanism of PAS will be explained and results from experiments and numerical modelling will be presented to demonstrate the generic character of the phenomenon.
Lagrangian transport in deterministic flows: from theory to experiment
16:10 Tue 16 May, 2017 :: Engineering North N132 :: Dr Michel Speetjens :: Eindhoven University of Technology

Transport of scalar quantities (e.g. chemical species, nutrients, heat) in deterministic flows is key to a wide range of phenomena and processes in industry and Nature. This encompasses length scales ranging from microns to hundreds of kilometres, and includes systems as diverse as viscous flows in the processing industry, micro-fluidic flows in labs-on-a-chip and porous media, large-scale geophysical and environmental flows, physiological and biological flows and even continuum descriptions of granular flows. Essential to the net transport of a scalar quantity is its advection by the fluid motion. The Lagrangian perspective (arguably) is the most natural way to investigate advection and leans on the fact that fluid trajectories are organized into coherent structures that geometrically determine the advective transport properties. Lagrangian transport is typically investigated via theoretical and computational studies and often concerns idealized flow situations that are difficult (or even impossible) to create in laboratory experiments. However, bridging the gap from theoretical and computational results to realistic flows is essential for their physical meaningfulness and practical relevance. This presentation highlights a number of fundamental Lagrangian transport phenomena and properties in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows and demonstrates their physical validity by way of representative and experimentally realizable flows.
Stokes' Phenomenon in Translating Bubbles
15:10 Fri 2 Jun, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Chris Lustri :: Macquarie University

This study of translating air bubbles in a Hele-Shaw cell containing viscous fluid reveals the critical role played by surface tension in these systems. The standard zero-surface-tension model of Hele-Shaw flow predicts that a continuum of bubble solutions exists for arbitrary flow translation velocity. The inclusion of small surface tension, however, eliminates this continuum of solutions, instead producing a discrete, countably infinite family of solutions, each with distinct translation speeds. We are interested in determining this discrete family of solutions, and understanding why only these solutions are permitted. Studying this problem in the asymptotic limit of small surface tension does not seem to give any particular reason why only these solutions should be selected. It is only by using exponential asymptotic methods to study the Stokes’ structure hidden in the problem that we are able to obtain a complete picture of the bubble behaviour, and hence understand the selection mechanism that only permits certain solutions to exist. In the first half of my talk, I will explain the powerful ideas that underpin exponential asymptotic techniques, such as analytic continuation and optimal truncation. I will show how they are able to capture behaviour known as Stokes' Phenomenon, which is typically invisible to classical asymptotic series methods. In the second half of the talk, I will introduce the problem of a translating air bubble in a Hele-Shaw cell, and show that the behaviour can be fully understood by examining the Stokes' structure concealed within the problem. Finally, I will briefly showcase other important physical applications of exponential asymptotic methods, including submarine waves and particle chains.
Exact coherent structures in high speed flows
15:10 Fri 28 Jul, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Philip Hall :: Monash University

In recent years, there has been much interest in the relevance of nonlinear solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to fully turbulent flows. The solutions must be calculated numerically at moderate Reynolds numbers but in the limit of high Reynolds numbers asymptotic methods can be used to greatly simplify the computational task and to uncover the key physical processes sustaining the nonlinear states. In particular, in confined flows exact coherent structures defining the boundary between the laminar and turbulent attractors can be constructed. In addition, structures which capture the essential physical properties of fully turbulent flows can be found. The extension of the ideas to boundary layer flows and current work attempting to explain the law of the wall will be discussed.
Curvature contraction of axially symmetric hypersurfaces in the sphere
12:10 Fri 4 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: James McCoy :: University of Wollongong

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We show that convex surfaces in an ambient three-sphere contract to round points in finite time under fully nonlinear, degree one homogeneous curvature flows, with no concavity condition on the speed. The result extends to convex axially symmetric hypersurfaces of S^{n+1}. Using a different pinching function we also obtain the analogous results for contraction by Gauss curvature.
On the fundamental of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and interfacial mixing
15:10 Fri 15 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Snezhana Abarzhi :: University of Western Australia

Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) develops when fluids of different densities are accelerated against their density gradient. Extensive interfacial mixing of the fluids ensues with time. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing controls a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials, in high and low energy density regimes, at astrophysical and atomistic scales. Examples include formation of hot spot in inertial confinement, supernova explosion, stellar and planetary convection, flows in atmosphere and ocean, reactive and supercritical fluids, material transformation under impact and light-material interaction. In some of these cases (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) RT mixing should be tightly mitigated; in some others (e.g. turbulent combustion) it should be strongly enhanced. Understanding the fundamentals of RTI is crucial for achieving a better control of non-equilibrium processes in nature and technology. Traditionally, it was presumed that RTI leads to uncontrolled growth of small-scale imperfections, single-scale nonlinear dynamics, and extensive mixing that is similar to canonical turbulence. The recent success of the theory and experiments in fluids and plasmas suggests an alternative scenario of RTI evolution. It finds that the interface is necessary for RT mixing to accelerate, the acceleration effects are strong enough to suppress the development of turbulence, and the RT dynamics is multi-scale and has significant degree of order. This talk presents a physics-based consideration of fundamentals of RTI and RT mixing, and summarizes what is certain and what is not so certain in our knowledge of RTI. The focus question - How to influence the regularization process in RT mixing? We also discuss new opportunities for improvements of predictive modeling capabilities, physical description, and control of RT mixing in fluids, plasmas and materials.
Stability Through a Geometric Lens
15:10 Fri 18 May, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Dr Robby Marangell :: University of Sydney

Focussing on the example of the Fisher/KPP equation, I will show how geometric information can be used to establish (in)stability results in some partial differential equations (PDEs). Viewing standing and travelling waves as fixed points of a flow in an infinite dimensional system, leads to a reduction of the linearised stability problem to a boundary value problem in a linear non-autonomous ordinary differential equation (ODE). Next, by exploiting the linearity of the system, one can use geometric ideas to reveal additional structure underlying the determination of stability. I will show how the Riccati equation can be used to produce a reasonably computable detector of eigenvalues and how such a detector is related to another, well-known eigenvalue detector, the Evans function. If there is time, I will try to expand on how to generalise these ideas to systems of PDEs.
The topology and geometry of spaces of Yang-Mills-Higgs flow lines
11:10 Fri 27 Jul, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Graeme Wilkin :: National University of Singapore

Given a smooth complex vector bundle over a compact Riemann surface, one can define the space of Higgs bundles and an energy functional on this space: the Yang-Mills-Higgs functional. The gradient flow of this functional resembles a nonlinear heat equation, and the limit of the flow detects information about the algebraic structure of the initial Higgs bundle (e.g. whether or not it is semistable). In this talk I will explain my work to classify ancient solutions of the Yang-Mills-Higgs flow in terms of their algebraic structure, which leads to an algebro-geometric classification of Yang-Mills-Higgs flow lines. Critical points connected by flow lines can then be interpreted in terms of the Hecke correspondence, which appears in Witten’s recent work on Geometric Langlands. This classification also gives a geometric description of spaces of unbroken flow lines in terms of secant varieties of the underlying Riemann surface, and in the remaining time I will describe work in progress to relate the (analytic) Morse compactification of these spaces by broken flow lines to an algebro-geometric compactification by iterated blowups of secant varieties.
An Introduction to Ricci Flow
11:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Miles Simon :: University of Magdeburg

In these three talks we give an introduction to Ricci flow and present some applications thereof. After introducing the Ricci flow we present some theorems and arguments from the theory of linear and non-linear parabolic equations. We explain why this theory guarantees that there is always a solution to the Ricci flow for a short time for any given smooth initial metric on a compact manifold without boundary. We calculate evolution equations for certain geometric quantities, and present some examples of maximum principle type arguments. In the last lecture we present some geometric results which are derived with the help of the Ricci flow.
Local Ricci flow and limits of non-collapsed regions whose Ricci curvature is bounded from below
11:10 Fri 26 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Miles Simon :: University of Magdeburg

We use a local Ricci flow to obtain a bi-Holder correspondence between non-collapsed (possibly non-complete) 3-manifolds with Ricci curvature bounded from below and Gromov-Hausdorff limits of sequences thereof. This is joint work with Peter Topping and the proofs build on results and ideas from recent papers of Hochard and Topping+Simon.

News matching "Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows"

Best paper prize
The paper "Flow in the vitreous humour of the eye induced by saccadic eyeball motion" by R. Repetto, J. H. Siggers, M. D. Finn and A. Stocchino has been awarded the best paper prize at the 4th Asian-Pacific Conference on Biomechanics held recently in Christchurch, New Zealand. Posted Mon 20 Apr 09.
ARC Grant successes
Congratulations to Tony Roberts, Charles Pearce, Robert Elliot, Andrew Metcalfe and all their collaborators on their success in the current round of ARC grants. The projects are "Development of innovative technologies for oil production based on the advanced theory of suspension flows in porous media" (Tony Roberts et al.), "Perturbation and approximation methods for linear operators with applications to train control, water resource management and evolution of physical systems" (Charles Pearce et al.), "Risk Measures and Management in Finance and Actuarial Science Under Regime-Switching Models" (Robert Elliott et al.) and "A new flood design methodology for a variable and changing climate" (Andrew Metcalfe et al.) Posted Mon 26 Oct 09.
Hydrological Society of SA Ian Liang Prize
Congratulations to Hayden Tronnolone who has been awarded the 2011 Ian Laing Prize by the Hydrological Society of South Australia. The annual prize, awarded to a student undertaking the final year of an ordinary or honours degree course or post graduate diploma course which involves some study of hydrology, water resource management, or related sciences, was awarded to Hayden for the work he undertook in his honours project on the study of flow in spiral particle separators. Hayden ins currently undertaking a PhD under the supervision of Dr Yvonne Stokes and Dr Matt Finn. Posted Mon 30 May 11.
First Australian-New Zealand Rotating Flows Workshop
The first Australian-New Zealand Rotating Flow Workshop will be held from 9th to 11th of January 2012. The workshop, organised by the School of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Adelaide and the Department of Engineering Science at the University of Auckland, will bring together world leading researchers in the broad field of rotating flows. The workshop is sponsored by AMSI, the School of Mathematical Sciences, the University of Auckland and the Royal Society of New Zealand. Please visit the workshop website for further details. Posted Sat 24 Sep 11.

Publications matching "Flow barriers and flux in unsteady flows"

Publications
Hitting probabilities and hitting times for stochastic fluid flows the bounded model
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, P, Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences 23 (121–147) 2009
Medical imaging and processing methods for cardiac flow reconstruction
Wong, Kelvin; Kelso, Richard; Worthley, Stephen; Sanders, Prashanthan; Mazumdar, Jagan; Abbott, Derek, Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology 9 (1–20) 2009
On satisfying the radiation condition in free-surface flows
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J; Dias, F, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 624 (179–189) 2009
The decay of suddenly blocked flow in a curved pipe
Clarke, Robert; Denier, James, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 63 (241–257) 2009
Unsteady response of non-Newtonian blood flow through a stenosed artery in magnetic field
Ikbal, M; Chakravarty, S; Wong, Kelvin; Mazumdar, Jagan; Mandal, P, Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics 230 (243–259) 2009
On penalty approaches for navier-slip and other boundary conditions in vicous flow
Stokes, Yvonne; Carey, G, XXII International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Adelaide 24/08/08
Topological chaos in flows on surfaces of arbitrary genus
Finn, Matthew; Thiffeault, J, XXII International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Adelaide 24/08/08
Algorithms for the Laplace-Stieltjes transforms of first return times for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability 10 (381–408) 2008
Influence of rapid changes in a channel bottom on free-surface flows
Binder, Benjamin; Dias, F; Vanden-Broeck, J, IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 73 (254–273) 2008
Unsteady fronts in the spin-down of a fluid-filled torus
del Pino, C; Hewitt, R; Clarke, Richard; Mullin, T; Denier, James, Physics of Fluids 20 (124104-1–124104-5) 2008
The inertial dynamics of thin film flow of non-Newtonian fluids
Roberts, Anthony John, Physics Letters A 372 (1607–1611) 2008
Computer algebra describes flow of turbulent floods via the Smagorinski large eddy closure (Unpublished)
Roberts, Anthony John,
Preliminary investigation of impulsively blocked pipe flow
Toophanpour Rami, Mehdi; Hassan, Eyad; Kelso, Richard; Denier, James, 16th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference, Gold Coast, Australia 03/12/07
The effect of disturbances on the flows under a sluice gate and past an inclined plate
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 576 (475–490) 2007
Two-dimensional Stokes flow driven by elliptical paddles
Cox, Stephen; Finn, Matthew, Physics of Fluids 19 (113102-1–113102-12) 2007
The dynamics of the vertical structure of turbulence in flood flows
Georgiev, D; Roberts, Anthony John; Strunin, D, The ANZIAM Journal - On-line full-text 48 (C573–C590) 2007
Computer algebra models the inertial dynamics of a thin film flow of power law fluids and other non-Newtonian fluids (Unpublished)
Roberts, Anthony John,
On mysteriously missing T-duals, H-flux and the T-duality Group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, chapter in Differential geometry and physics (World Scientific Publishing) 350–358, 2006
A bistable reaction-diffusion system in a stretching flow
Cox, Stephen; Gottwald, G, Physica D 216 (307–318) 2006
Flux compactifications on projective spaces and the S-duality puzzle
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Jurco, B; Varghese, Mathai; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (345–394) 2006
Reduced models of chemical reaction in chaotic flows
Vikhansky, A; Cox, Stephen, Physics of Fluids 18 (37102–37102) 2006
Steady free-surface flow past an uneven channel bottom
Binder, Benjamin; Dias, F; Vanden-Broeck, J, Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics 20 (125–144) 2006
The instability of the flow in a suddenly blocked pipe
Jewell, Nathaniel; Denier, James, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics 59 (651–673) 2006
An accurate and comprehensive model of thin fluid flows with inertia on curved substrates
Roberts, Anthony John; Li, Z, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 553 (33–73) 2006
Three-dimensional flow due to a microcantilever oscillating near a wall: an unsteady slender-body analysis
Clarke, Richard; Jensen, O; Billingham, J; Williams, P, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 462 (913–933) 2006
A hydrodynamic model of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, The XXXI IAHR Congress, Seoul, Korea 11/09/05
A 3-D non-hydrostatic pressure model for small amplitude free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 50 (649–672) 2005
Algorithms for return probabilities for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Stochastic Models 21 (149–184) 2005
Applications of the artificial compressibility method for turbulent open channel flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 51 (617–633) 2005
Development of a 3D non-hydrostatic pressure model for free surface flows
Lee, Jong; Teubner, Michael; Nixon, John; Gill, Peter, The ANZIAM Journal - On-line full-text 46 (623–636) 2005
Hitting probabilities and hitting times for stochastic fluid flows
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata; Taylor, Peter, Stochastic Processes and their Applications 115 (1530–1556) 2005
Self-similar "stagnation point" boundary layer flows with suction or injection
King, J; Cox, Stephen, Studies in Applied Mathematics 115 (73–107) 2005
Optimal nose shaping for delayed boundary-layer separation in laminar plane-symmetric and axisymmetric flow
Mattner, Trent; Tuck, Ernest; Denier, James, ANZIAM Applied Mathematics Conference (41st: 2005: Hawke's Bay, N.Z.), Napier, New Zealand 31/01/05
Predicting the off-site deposition of spray drift from horticultural spraying through porous barriers on soil and plant surfaces.
Mercer, G; Roberts, Anthony John, 22nd Mathematics-In -Industry Study Group, Auckland, New Zealand 24/01/05
Free surface flows past surfboards and sluice gates
Binder, Benjamin; Vanden-Broeck, J, European Journal of Applied Mathematics 16 (601–619) 2005
Optimal nose shaping for delayed boundary-layer separation in laminar plane-symmetric and axisymmetric flow
Mattner, Trent; Tuck, Ernest; Denier, James, 15th Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference 2004, Sydney, Australia 13/12/04
The stability of decaying pipe flow
Jewell, Nathaniel; Denier, James, Fifteenth Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference 2004, Sydney, Australia 13/12/04
Thin-film flow in open helically-wound channels
Stokes, Yvonne; Wilson, S; Duffy, B, Fifteenth Australasian Fluid Mechanics Conference 2004, Sydney, Australia 13/12/04
Asymptotic matching constraints for a boundary-layer flow of a power-law fluid
Denier, James; Hewitt, R, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 518 (261–279) 2004
Mixing measures for a two-dimensional chaotic Stokes flow
Finn, Matthew; Cox, Stephen; Byrne, H, Journal of Engineering Mathematics 48 (129–155) 2004
Relationships between the El-Nino southern oscillation and spate flows in southern Africa and Australia
Whiting, Julian; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew; Adamson, Peter; Franks, S; Kuczera, George, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 8 (1118–1128) 2004
T-duality: Topology change from H-flux
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 249 (383–415) 2004
The angiographic and clinical benefits of mibefradil in the coronary slow flow phenomenon
Beltrame, John; Turner, Stuart; Leslie, S; Solomon, Patricia; Freedman, S; Horowitz, John, Journal of the American College of Cardiology 44 (57–62) 2004
Topology and H-flux of T-dual manifolds
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Varghese, Mathai, Physical Review Letters 92 (181601-1–181601-3) 2004
Diffusive mass transfer and its effect upon boundary-layer flows
Halatchev, Iordan; Denier, James, Computational Fluid Dynamics 2002, Sydney, Australia 15/07/03
The stability of helical flow of pseudoplastic fluids
Akroyd, Timothy; Nguyen, Quoc; Denier, James, The 31st Australasian Chemical Engineering Conference, Adelaide, South Australia 22/06/03
Numerical error in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation
Woods, Juliette; Teubner, Michael; Simmons, Craig; Narayan, K, Water Resources Research 39 (SBH 10-1–SBH 10-11) 2003
The stability of boundary-layer flows under conditions of intense interfacial mass transfer: the effect of interfacial coupling
Halatchev, Iordan; Denier, James, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 46 (3881–3895) 2003
Type-1 D-branes in an H-flux and twisted KO-theory
Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online Editions) 11 (www 1–www 22) 2003
Vortical flow. Part 2. Flow past a sphere in a constant-diameter pipe
Mattner, Trent; Joubert, P; Chong, Min, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 481 (1–36) 2003
Groundwater flow and solute transport at the Mourquong saline-water disposal basin, Murray Basin, southeastern Australia
Simmons, Craig; Narayan, K; Woods, Juliette; Herczeg, A, Hydrogeology Journal 10 (278–295) 2002
A lubrication model of coating flows over a curved substrate in space
Roy, R; Roberts, Anthony John; Simpson, M, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 454 (235–261) 2002
Vortical flow. Part 1. Flow through a constant-diameter pipe
Mattner, Trent; Joubert, P; Chong, Min, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 463 (259–291) 2002
Flow in spiral channels of small curvature and torsion
Stokes, Yvonne, The IUTAM Symposium on Free Surface Flows, Birmingham, UK 10/07/00
Stochastic flows and the forward measure
Elliott, Robert; Van Der Hoek, John, Finance and Stochastics 5 (511–525) 2001
Three-dimensional inviscid waves in buoyant boundary layer flows
Denier, James; Stott, Jillian; Bassom, A, Fluid Dynamics Research 28 (89–109) 2001
A GUI for computing flows past general airfoils
Simakov, Sergey; Dostovalova, Anna; Tuck, Ernest, The MATLAB User Conference 2000, Melbourne, Australia 09/11/00
An open-channel flow meeting a barrier and forming one or two jets
Wiryanto, Leonardus; Tuck, Ernest, The ANZIAM Journal 41 (458–472) 2000
Regional cerebral blood flow in fibromyalgia Single-photon-emission computed tomography evidence of reduction in the pontine tegmentum and thalami
Kwiatek, R; Barnden, L; Tedman, Raymond; Jarrett, Richard; Chew, J; Rowe, Christopher; Pile, Kevin, Arthritis and Rheumatism 43 (2823–2833) 2000
Unsteady stenosis flow prediction: a comparative study of non-Newtonian models with operator splitting scheme
Siauw, W; Ng, E; Mazumdar, Jagan, Medical Engineering & Physics 22 (265–277) 2000

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