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Courses matching "Character Formula for Discrete Series"

Time Series III

Time series consist of values of a variable recorded over a long period of time. Such data arise in just about every area of science and the humanities, including econometrics and finance, engineering, medicine, genetics, sociology, environmental science. What makes time series data special is the presence of dependence between observations in a series, and the fact that usually only one observation is made at any given point in time. This means that standard statistical methods are not appropriate, and special methods for statistical analysis are needed. This course provides an introduction to time series analysis using current methodology and software. Topics covered are: descriptive methods, plots, smoothing, differencing, the autocorrelation function, the correlogram and the variogram; the periodogram, estimation and elimination of trend and seasonal components; stationary processes, modelling and forecasting with autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models; spectral analysis, the fast Fourier transform, periodogram averages and other smooth estimates of the spectrum, time-invariant linear filters; non-stationary and seasonal time series models. ARIMA processes, identification, estimation and diagnostic checking, forecasting, including extrapolation of polynomial trends, exponential smoothing, and the Box-Jenkins approach.

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Events matching "Character Formula for Discrete Series"

Statistical convergence of sequences of complex numbers with application to Fourier series
15:10 Tue 27 Mar, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Ferenc Morics

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The concept of statistical convergence was introduced by Henry Fast and Hugo Steinhaus in 1951. But in fact, it was Antoni Zygmund who first proved theorems on the statistical convergence of Fourier series, using the term \"almost convergence\". A sequence $\\{x_k : k=1,2\\ldots\\}$ of complex numbers is said to be statistically convergent to $\\xi$ if for every $\\varepsilon >0$ we have $$\\lim_{n\\to \\infty} n^{-1} |\\{1\\le k\\le n: |x_k-\\xi| > \\varepsilon\\}| = 0.$$ We present the basic properties of statistical convergence, and extend it to multiple sequences. We also discuss the convergence behavior of Fourier series.
Identifying the source of photographic images by analysis of JPEG quantization artifacts
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Matthew Sorell

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In a forensic context, digital photographs are becoming more common as sources of evidence in criminal and civil matters. Questions that arise include identifying the make and model of a camera to assist in the gathering of physical evidence; matching photographs to a particular camera through the camera’s unique characteristics; and determining the integrity of a digital image, including whether the image contains steganographic information. From a digital file perspective, there is also the question of whether metadata has been deliberately modified to mislead the investigator, and in the case of multiple images, whether a timeline can be established from the various timestamps within the file, imposed by the operating system or determined by other image characteristics. This talk is concerned specifically with techniques to identify the make, model series and particular source camera model given a digital image. We exploit particular characteristics of the camera’s JPEG coder to demonstrate that such identification is possible, and that even when an image has subsequently been re-processed, there are often sufficient residual characteristics of the original coding to at least narrow down the possible camera models of interest.
Queues with Advance Reservations
15:10 Fri 21 Sep, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Peter Taylor :: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne

Queues where, on "arrival", customers make a reservation for service at some time in the future are endemic. However there is surprisingly little about them in the literature. Simulations illustrate some interesting implications of the facility to make such reservations. For example introducing independent and identically distributed reservation periods into an Erlang loss system can either increase or decrease the blocking probability from that given by Erlang's formula, despite the fact that the process of 'reserved arrivals' is still Poisson. In this talk we shall discuss a number of ways of looking at such queues. In particular, we shall obtain various transient and stationary distributions associated with the "bookings diary" for the infinite server system. However, this does not immediately answer the question of how to calculate the above-mentioned blocking probabilities. We shall conclude with a few suggestions as to how this calculation might be carried out.
Dynamics of Moving Average Rules in a Continuous-time Financial Market Model
15:10 Fri 8 May, 2009 :: LG29 :: Associate Prof (Tony) Xuezhong He :: University of Technology Sydney

Within a continuous-time framework, this paper proposes a stochastic heterogeneous agent model (HAM) of financial markets with time delays to unify various moving average rules used in discrete-time HAMs. Intuitive conditions for the stability of the fundamental price of the deterministic model in terms of agents' behavior parameters and time delay are obtained. By focusing on the stabilizing role of the time delay, it is found that an increase in time delay not only can destabilize the market price, resulting in oscillatory market price characterized by a Hopf bifurcation, but also can stabilize an otherwise unstable market price. Numerical simulations show that the stochastic model is able to characterize long deviations of the market price from its fundamental price and excess volatility and generate most of the stylized facts observed in financial markets.
Averaging reduction for stochastic PDEs
15:10 Fri 5 Jun, 2009 :: LG29 :: Dr Wei Wang :: University of Adelaide

In this talk, I introduce recent work on macroscopic reduction for stochastic PDEs by an averaging method. Furthermore by using a special coupling boundary conditions, a macroscopic discrete approximation model can be derived.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Manifold destiny: a talk on water, fire and life
15:10 Fri 6 Nov, 2009 :: MacBeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Sanjeeva Balasuriya :: University of Adelaide

Manifolds are important entities in dynamical systems, and organise space into regions in which different motions occur. For example, intersections between stable and unstable manifolds in discrete systems result in chaotic motion. This talk will focus on manifolds and their locations in continuous dynamical systems, and in particular on Melnikov's method and its adaptations for determining the effect of perturbations on manifolds. The relevance of such adaptations to a surprising range of applications will be shown, in addition to recent theoretical developments inspired by such problems. The applications addressed in this talk include understanding the motion of fluid near oceanic eddies and currents, optimising mixing in nano-fluidic devices in order to improve reactions, computing the speed of a flame front, and finding the spreading rate of bacterial colonies.
Eigen-analysis of fluid-loaded compliant panels
15:10 Wed 9 Dec, 2009 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Prof Tony Lucey :: Curtin University of Technology

This presentation concerns the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) that occurs between a fluid flow and an arbitrarily deforming flexible boundary considered to be a flexible panel or a compliant coating that comprises the wetted surface of a marine vehicle. We develop and deploy an approach that is a hybrid of computational and theoretical techniques. The system studied is two-dimensional and linearised disturbances are assumed. Of particular novelty in the present work is the ability of our methods to extract a full set of fluid-structure eigenmodes for systems that have strong spatial inhomogeneity in the structure of the flexible wall.

We first present the approach and some results of the system in which an ideal, zero-pressure gradient, flow interacts with a flexible plate held at both its ends. We use a combination of boundary-element and finite-difference methods to express the FSI system as a single matrix equation in the interfacial variable. This is then couched in state-space form and standard methods used to extract the system eigenvalues. It is then shown how the incorporation of spatial inhomogeneity in the stiffness of the plate can be either stabilising or destabilising. We also show that adding a further restraint within the streamwise extent of a homogeneous panel can trigger an additional type of hydroelastic instability at low flow speeds. The mechanism for the fluid-to-structure energy transfer that underpins this instability can be explained in terms of the pressure-signal phase relative to that of the wall motion and the effect on this relationship of the added wall restraint.

We then show how the ideal-flow approach can be conceptually extended to include boundary-layer effects. The flow field is now modelled by the continuity equation and the linearised perturbation momentum equation written in velocity-velocity form. The near-wall flow field is spatially discretised into rectangular elements on an Eulerian grid and a variant of the discrete-vortex method is applied. The entire fluid-structure system can again be assembled as a linear system for a single set of unknowns - the flow-field vorticity and the wall displacements - that admits the extraction of eigenvalues. We then show how stability diagrams for the fully-coupled finite flow-structure system can be assembled, in doing so identifying classes of wall-based or fluid-based and spatio-temporal wave behaviour.

Nonlinear time series econometrics and financial econometrics: a personal overview
15:10 Fri 12 Mar, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Jiti Gao :: University of Adelaide

Through using ten examples, the talk focuses on the recent development on nonlinear time series econometrics and financial econometrics. Such examples cover the following models: 1. Nonlinear time series trend model; 2. Partially linear autoregressive model; 3. Nonlinear capital asset pricing model; 4. Additive capital asset pricing model; 5. Varying-coefficient capital asset pricing model; 6. Semiparametric error-term model; 7. Nonlinear and nonstationary model; 8. Partially linear ARCH model; 9. Continuous-time financial model; and 10. Stochastic volatility model.
The Jeffery–Hamel similarity solution and its relation to flow in a diverging channel
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Phil Haines :: University of Adelaide

Jeffery–Hamel flows describe the steady two-dimensional flow of an incompressible viscous fluid between plane walls separated by an angle $\alpha$. They are often used to approximate the flow in domains of finite radial extent. However, whilst the base Jeffery–Hamel solution is characterised by a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation, studies in expanding channels of finite length typically find symmetry breaking via a supercritical bifurcation.

We use the finite element method to calculate solutions for flow in a two-dimensional wedge of finite length bounded by arcs of constant radii, $R_1$ and $R_2$. We present a comprehensive picture of the bifurcation structure and nonlinear states for a net radial outflow of fluid. We find a series of nested neutral curves in the Reynolds number-$\alpha$ plane corresponding to pitchfork bifurcations that break the midplane symmetry of the flow. We show that these finite domain bifurcations remain distinct from the similarity solution bifurcation even in the limit $R_2/R_1 \rightarrow \infty$.

We also discuss a class of stable steady solutions apparently related to a steady, spatially periodic, wave first observed by Tutty (1996). These solutions remain disconnected in our domain in the sense that they do not arise via a local bifurcation of the Stokes flow solution as the Reynolds number is increased.

Modelling of the Human Skin Equivalent
15:10 Fri 26 Mar, 2010 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Graeme Pettet :: Queensland University of Technology

A brief overview will be given of the development of a so called Human Skin Equivalent Construct. This laboratory grown construct can be used for studying growth, response and the repair of human skin subjected to wounding and/or treatment under strictly regulated conditions. Details will also be provided of a series of mathematical models we have developed that describe the dynamics of the Human Skin Equivalent Construct, which can be used to assist in the development of the experimental protocol, and to provide insight into the fundamental processes at play in the growth and development of the epidermis in both healthy and diseased states.
Random walk integrals
13:10 Fri 16 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Jonathan Borwein :: University of Newcastle

Following Pearson in 1905, we study the expected distance of a two-dimensional walk in the plane with unit steps in random directions---what Pearson called a "ramble". A series evaluation and recursions are obtained making it possible to explicitly determine this distance for small number of steps. Closed form expressions for all the moments of a 2-step and a 3-step walk are given, and a formula is conjectured for the 4-step walk. Heavy use is made of the analytic continuation of the underlying integral.
Meteorological drivers of extreme bushfire events in southern Australia
15:10 Fri 2 Jul, 2010 :: Benham Lecture Theatre :: Prof Graham Mills :: Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne

Bushfires occur regularly during summer in southern Australia, but only a few of these fires become iconic due to their effects, either in terms of loss of life or economic and social cost. Such events include Black Friday (1939), the Hobart fires (1967), Ash Wednesday (1983), the Canberra bushfires (2003), and most recently Black Saturday in February 2009. In most of these events the weather of the day was statistically extreme in terms of heat, (low) humidity, and wind speed, and in terms of antecedent drought. There are a number of reasons for conducting post-event analyses of the meteorology of these events. One is to identify any meteorological circulation systems or dynamic processes occurring on those days that might not be widely or hitherto recognised, to document these, and to develop new forecast or guidance products. The understanding and prediction of such features can be used in the short term to assist in effective management of fires and the safety of firefighters and in the medium range to assist preparedness for the onset of extreme conditions. The results of such studies can also be applied to simulations of future climates to assess the likely changes in frequency of the most extreme fire weather events, and their documentary records provide a resource that can be used for advanced training purposes. In addition, particularly for events further in the past, revisiting these events using reanalysis data sets and contemporary NWP models can also provide insights unavailable at the time of the events. Over the past few years the Bushfire CRC's Fire Weather and Fire Danger project in CAWCR has studied the mesoscale meteorology of a number of major fire events, including the days of Ash Wednesday 1983, the Dandenong Ranges fire in January 1997, the Canberra fires and the Alpine breakout fires in January 2003, the Lower Eyre Peninsula fires in January 2005 and the Boorabbin fire in December 2007-January 2008. Various aspects of these studies are described below, including the structures of dry cold frontal wind changes, the particular character of the cold fronts associated with the most damaging fires in southeastern Australia, and some aspects of how the vertical temperature and humidity structure of the atmosphere may affect the fire weather at the surface. These studies reveal much about these major events, but also suggest future research directions, and some of these will be discussed.
A spatial-temporal point process model for fine resolution multisite rainfall data from Roma, Italy
14:10 Thu 19 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: A/Prof Paul Cowpertwait :: Auckland University of Technology

A point process rainfall model is further developed that has storm origins occurring in space-time according to a Poisson process. Each storm origin has a random radius so that storms occur as circular regions in two-dimensional space, where the storm radii are taken to be independent exponential random variables. Storm origins are of random type z, where z follows a continuous probability distribution. Cell origins occur in a further spatial Poisson process and have arrival times that follow a Neyman-Scott point process. Cell origins have random radii so that cells form discs in two-dimensional space. Statistical properties up to third order are derived and used to fit the model to 10 min series taken from 23 sites across the Roma region, Italy. Distributional properties of the observed annual maxima are compared to equivalent values sampled from series that are simulated using the fitted model. The results indicate that the model will be of use in urban drainage projects for the Roma region.
Totally disconnected, locally compact groups
15:10 Fri 17 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof George Willis :: University of Newcastle

Locally compact groups occur in many branches of mathematics. Their study falls into two cases: connected groups, which occur as automorphisms of smooth structures such as spheres for example; and totally disconnected groups, which occur as automorphisms of discrete structures such as trees. The talk will give an overview of the currently developing structure theory of totally disconnected locally compact groups. Techniques for analysing totally disconnected groups will be described that correspond to the familiar Lie group methods used to treat connected groups. These techniques played an essential role in the recent solution of a problem raised by R. Zimmer and G. Margulis concerning commensurated subgroups of arithmetic groups.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Dirac operators in geometry, topology, representation theory, and physics
10:00 Mon 18 Oct, 2010 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Dan Freed :: University of Texas, Austin

Lecture Series by Dan Freed (University of Texas, Austin). Dirac introduced his eponymous operator to describe electrons in quantum theory. It was rediscovered by Atiyah and Singer in their study of the index problem on manifolds. In these lectures we explore new theorems and applications. Several of these also involve K-theory in its recent twisted and differential variations. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage: http://www.iga.adelaide.edu.au/workshops/WorkshopOct2010/
Surface quotients of hyperbolic buildings
13:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

Let I(p,v) be Bourdon's building, the unique simply-connected 2-complex such that all 2-cells are regular right-angled hyperbolic p-gons, and the link at each vertex is the complete bipartite graph K_{v,v}. We investigate and mostly determine the set of triples (p,v,g) for which there is a discrete group acting on I(p,v) so that the quotient is a compact orientable surface of genus g. Surprisingly, the existence of such a quotient depends upon the value of v. The remaining cases lead to open questions in tessellations of surfaces and in number theory. We use elementary group theory, combinatorics, algebraic topology and number theory. This is joint work with David Futer.
Lattices in exotic groups
15:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Anne Thomas :: University of Sydney

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A lattice in a locally compact group G is a discrete subgroup of cofinite volume. Lattices in Lie groups are well-studied, but little is known about lattices in other, "exotic", locally compact groups. Examples of exotic groups include isometry groups of trees, buildings, polyhedral complexes and CAT(0) spaces, and Kac-Moody groups. We will survey known results, which include both rigidity and surprising examples of flexibility, and discuss the wide range of tools used to investigate lattices in these non-classical settings.
A mathematical investigation of methane encapsulation in carbon nanotubes.
12:10 Mon 21 Mar, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Olumide Adisa :: University of Adelaide

I hope we don't have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that." - Thomas Edison, 1931. In a bid to resolve energy issues consistent with Thomas Edison's worries, scientists have been looking at other clean and sustainable sources of energy such as natural gas - methane. In this talk, the interaction between a methane molecule and carbon nanotubes is investigated mathematically, using two different models - first discrete and second, continuous. These models are analyzed to determine the dimensions of the particular nanotubes which will readily suck-up methane molecules. The results determine the minimum and maximum interaction energies required for methane encapsulation in different tube sizes, and establish the second model of the methane molecule as a simple and elegant model which might be exploited for other problems.
How to value risk
12:10 Mon 11 Apr, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Leo Shen :: University of Adelaide

A key question in mathematical finance is: given a future random payoff X, what is its value today? If X represents a loss, one can ask how risky is X. To mitigate risk it must be modelled and quantified. The finance industry has used Value-at-Risk and conditional Value-at-Risk as measures. However, these measures are not time consistent and Value-at-Risk can penalize diversification. A modern theory of risk measures is being developed which is related to solutions of backward stochastic differential equations in continuous time and stochastic difference equations in discrete time. I first review risk measures used in mathematical finance, including static and dynamic risk measures. I recall results relating to backward stochastic difference equations (BSDEs) associated with a single jump process. Then I evaluate some numerical examples of the solutions of the backward stochastic difference equations and related risk measures. These concepts are new. I hope the examples will indicate how they might be used.
The Cauchy integral formula
12:10 Mon 9 May, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Stephen Wade :: University of Adelaide

In this talk I will explain a simple method used for calculating the Hilbert transform of an analytic function, and provide some assurance that this isn't a bad thing to do in spite of the somewhat ominous presence of infinite areas. As it turns out this type of integral is not without an application, as will be demonstrated by one application to a problem in fluid mechanics.
Change detection in rainfall time series for Perth, Western Australia
12:10 Mon 16 May, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Farah Mohd Isa :: University of Adelaide

There have been numerous reports that the rainfall in south Western Australia, particularly around Perth has observed a step change decrease, which is typically attributed to climate change. Four statistical tests are used to assess the empirical evidence for this claim on time series from five meteorological stations, all of which exceed 50 years. The tests used in this study are: the CUSUM; Bayesian Change Point analysis; consecutive t-test and the Hotelling’s T²-statistic. Results from multivariate Hotelling’s T² analysis are compared with those from the three univariate analyses. The issue of multiple comparisons is discussed. A summary of the empirical evidence for the claimed step change in Perth area is given.
The (dual) local cyclic homology valued Chern-Connes character for some infinite dimensional spaces
13:10 Fri 29 Jul, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Snigdhayan Mahanta :: School of Mathematical Sciences

I will explain how to construct a bivariant Chern-Connes character on the category of sigma-C*-algebras taking values in Puschnigg's local cyclic homology. Roughly, setting the first (resp. the second) variable to complex numbers one obtains the K-theoretic (resp. dual K-homological) Chern-Connes character in one variable. We shall focus on the dual K-homological Chern-Connes character and investigate it in the example of SU(infty).
The real thing
12:10 Wed 3 Aug, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Paul McCann :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Let x be a real number. This familiar and seemingly innocent assumption opens up a world of infinite variety and information. We use some simple techniques (powers of two, geometric series) to examine some interesting consequences of generating random real numbers, and encounter both the best flash drive and the worst flash drive you will ever meet. Come "hold infinity in the palm of your hand", and contemplate eternity for about half an hour. Almost nothing is assumed, almost everything is explained, and absolutely all are welcome.
Towards Rogers-Ramanujan identities for the Lie algebra A_n
13:10 Fri 5 Aug, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ole Warnaar :: University of Queensland

The Rogers-Ramanujan identities are a pair of q-series identities proved by Leonard Rogers in 1894 which became famous two decades later as conjectures of Srinivasa Ramanujan. Since the 1980s it is known that the Rogers-Ramanujan identities are in fact identities for characters of certain modules for the affine Lie algebra A_1. This poses the obvious question as to whether there exist Rogers-Ramanujan identities for higher rank affine Lie algebras. In this talk I will describe some recent progress on this problem. I will also discuss a seemingly mysterious connection with the representation theory of quivers over finite fields.
Dealing with the GC-content bias in second-generation DNA sequence data
15:10 Fri 12 Aug, 2011 :: Horace Lamb :: Prof Terry Speed :: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

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The field of genomics is currently dealing with an explosion of data from so-called second-generation DNA sequencing machines. This is creating many challenges and opportunities for statisticians interested in the area. In this talk I will outline the technology and the data flood, and move on to one particular problem where the technology is used: copy-number analysis. There we find a novel bias, which, if not dealt with properly, can dominate the signal of interest. I will describe how we think about and summarize it, and go on to identify a plausible source of this bias, leading up to a way of removing it. Our approach makes use of the total variation metric on discrete measures, but apart from this, is largely descriptive.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
10:00 Mon 5 Sep, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli

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Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage.
Alignment of time course gene expression data sets using Hidden Markov Models
12:10 Mon 5 Sep, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Sean Robinson :: University of Adelaide

Time course microarray experiments allow for insight into biological processes by measuring gene expression over a time period of interest. This project is concerned with time course data from a microarray experiment conducted on a particular variety of grapevine over the development of the grape berries at a number of different vineyards in South Australia. The aim of the project is to construct a methodology for combining the data from the different vineyards in order to obtain more precise estimates of the underlying behaviour of the genes over the development process. A major issue in doing so is that the rate of development of the grape berries is different at different vineyards. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are a well established methodology for modelling time series data in a number of domains and have been previously used for gene expression analysis. Modelling the grapevine data presents a unique modelling issue, namely the alignment of the expression profiles needed to combine the data from different vineyards. In this seminar, I will describe our problem, review HMMs, present an extension to HMMs and show some preliminary results modelling the grapevine data.
Staircase to heaven
13:10 Fri 4 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Burkard Polster :: Monash University

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How much of an overhang can we produce by stacking identical rectangular blocks at the edge of a table? It has been known for at least 100 years that the overhang can be as large as desired: we arrange the blocks in the form of a staircase. With $n$ blocks of length 2 the overhang can be made to sum to $1+\frac{1}{2}+\frac{1}{3}+\frac{1}{4}+\cdots+\frac{1}{n}$. Since the harmonic series diverges, it follows that the overhang can be arranged to be as large as desired, simply by using a suitably large number of blocks. Recently, a number of interesting twists have been added to this paradoxical staircase. I'll be talking about some of these new developments and in particular about a continuous counterpart of the staircase that I've been pondering together with my colleagues David Treeby and Marty Ross.
Applications of tropical geometry to groups and manifolds
13:10 Mon 21 Nov, 2011 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Stephan Tillmann :: University of Queensland

Tropical geometry is a young field with multiple origins. These include the work of Bergman on logarithmic limit sets of algebraic varieties; the work of the Brazilian computer scientist Simon on discrete mathematics; the work of Bieri, Neumann and Strebel on geometric invariants of groups; and, of course, the work of Newton on polynomials. Even though there is still need for a unified foundation of the field, there is an abundance of applications of tropical geometry in group theory, combinatorics, computational algebra and algebraic geometry. In this talk I will give an overview of (what I understand to be) tropical geometry with a bias towards applications to group theory and low-dimensional topology.
Fluid flows in microstructured optical fibre fabrication
15:10 Fri 25 Nov, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Hayden Tronnolone :: University of Adelaide

Optical fibres are used extensively in modern telecommunications as they allow the transmission of information at high speeds. Microstructured optical fibres are a relatively new fibre design in which a waveguide for light is created by a series of air channels running along the length of the material. The flexibility of this design allows optical fibres to be created with adaptable (and previously unrealised) optical properties. However, the fluid flows that arise during fabrication can greatly distort the geometry, which can reduce the effectiveness of a fibre or render it useless. I will present an overview of the manufacturing process and highlight the difficulties. I will then focus on surface-tension driven deformation of the macroscopic version of the fibre extruded from a reservoir of molten glass, occurring during fabrication, which will be treated as a two-dimensional Stokes flow problem. I will outline two different complex-variable numerical techniques for solving this problem along with comparisons of the results, both to other models and to experimental data.
Plurisubharmonic subextensions as envelopes of disc functionals
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will describe new joint work with Evgeny Poletsky. We prove a disc formula for the largest plurisubharmonic subextension of an upper semicontinuous function on a domain $W$ in a Stein manifold to a larger domain $X$ under suitable conditions on $W$ and $X$. We introduce a related equivalence relation on the space of analytic discs in $X$ with boundary in $W$. The quotient is a complex manifold with a local biholomorphism to $X$, except it need not be Hausdorff. We use our disc formula to generalise Kiselman's minimum principle. We show that his infimum function is an example of a plurisubharmonic subextension.
IGA Workshop: The mathematical implications of gauge-string dualities
09:30 Mon 5 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Rajesh Gopakumar :: Harish-Chandra Research Institute

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Lecture series by Rajesh Gopakumar (Harish-Chandra Research Institute). The lectures will be supplemented by talks by other invited speakers.
IGA Workshop: Dualities in field theories and the role of K-theory
09:30 Mon 19 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Jonathan Rosenberg :: University of Maryland

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Lecture series by Jonathan Rosenberg (University of Maryland). There will be additional talks by other invited speakers.
The entropy of an overlapping dynamical system
15:10 Fri 23 Mar, 2012 :: Napier G03 :: Prof Michael Barnsley :: Australian National University

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The term "overlapping" refers to a certain fairly simple type of piecewise continuous function from the unit interval to itself and also to a fairly simple type of iterated function system (IFS) on the unit interval. A correspondence between these two classes of objects is used to: 1. find a necessary and sufficient condition for a fractal transformation from the attractor of one overlapping IFS to the attractor of another overlapping IFS to be a homeomorphism and 2. find a formula for the topological entropy of the dynamical system associated with an overlapping function. These results suggest a new method for analysing clocks, weather systems and prime numbers.
Financial risk measures - the theory and applications of backward stochastic difference/differential equations with respect to the single jump process
12:10 Mon 26 Mar, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Bin Shen :: University of Adelaide

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This is my PhD thesis submitted one month ago. Chapter 1 introduces the backgrounds of the research fields. Then each chapter is a published or an accepted paper. Chapter 2, to appear in Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Difference Equations with respect to the single jump process in discrete time. Chapter 3, published in Stochastic Analysis and Applications, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Differential Equations with respect to the single jump process in continuous time. Chapter 2 and 3 consist of Part I Theory. Chapter 4, published in Expert Systems With Applications, gives some examples about how to measure financial risks by the theory established in Chapter 2. Chapter 5, accepted by Journal of Applied Probability, considers the question of an optimal transaction between two investors to minimize their risks. It's the applications of the theory established in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 and 5 consist of Part II Applications.
A Problem of Siegel
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Brent Everitt :: University of York

The first explicit examples of orientable hyperbolic 3-manifolds were constructed by Weber, Siefert, and Lobell in the early 1930's. In the subsequent decades the world of hyperbolic n-manifolds has grown into an extraordinarily rich one. Its sociology is best understood through the eyes of invariants, and for hyperbolic manifolds the most important invariant is volume. Viewed this way the n-dimensional hyperbolic manifolds, for fixed n, look like a well-ordered subset of the reals (a discrete set even, when n is not 3). So we are naturally led to the (manifold) Siegel problem: for a given n, determine the minimum possible volume obtained by an orientable hyperbolic n-manifold. It is a problem with a long and venerable history. In this talk I will describe a unified solution to the problem in low even dimensions, one of which at least is new. Joint work with John Ratcliffe and Steve Tschantz (Vanderbilt).
Spatial-point data sets and the Polya distribution
15:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Benjamin Binder :: The University of Adelaide

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Spatial-point data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems and mathematical models, can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in equally sized bins. We find that the bin counts are related to the Polya distribution. New indexes are developed which quantify whether or not a spatial data set is at its most evenly distributed state. Using three case studies (Lagrangian fluid particles in chaotic laminar flows, cellular automata agents in discrete models, and biological cells within colonies), we calculate the indexes and predict the spatial-state of the system.
Multiscale models of collective cell behaviour: Linear or nonlinear diffusion?
15:10 Fri 4 May, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Matthew Simpson :: Queensland University of Technology

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Continuum diffusion models are often used to represent the collective motion of cell populations. Most previous studies have simply used linear diffusion to represent collective cell spreading, while others found that degenerate nonlinear diffusion provides a better match to experimental cell density profiles. There is no guidance available in the mathematical biology literature with regard to which approach is more appropriate. Furthermore, there is no knowledge of particular experimental measurements that can be made to distinguish between situations where these two models are appropriate. We provide a link between individual-based and continuum models using a multiscale approach in which we analyse the collective motion of a population of interacting agents in a generalized lattice-based exclusion process. For round agents that occupy a single lattice site, we find that the relevant continuum description is a linear diffusion equation, whereas for elongated rod-shaped agents that occupy L adjacent lattice sites we find that the relevant continuum description is a nonlinear diffusion equation related to the porous media equation. We show that there are several reasonable approaches for dealing with agent size effects, and that these different approaches are related mathematically through the concept of mean action time. We extend our results to consider proliferation and travelling waves where greater care must be taken to ensure that the continuum model replicates the discrete process. This is joint work with Dr Ruth Baker (Oxford) and Dr Scott McCue (QUT).
Change detection in rainfall times series for Perth, Western Australia
12:10 Mon 14 May, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Farah Mohd Isa :: University of Adelaide

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There have been numerous reports that the rainfall in south Western Australia, particularly around Perth has observed a step change decrease, which is typically attributed to climate change. Four statistical tests are used to assess the empirical evidence for this claim on time series from five meteorological stations, all of which exceed 50 years. The tests used in this study are: the CUSUM; Bayesian Change Point analysis; consecutive t-test and the Hotelling's T^2-statistic. Results from multivariate Hotelling's T^2 analysis are compared with those from the three univariate analyses. The issue of multiple comparisons is discussed. A summary of the empirical evidence for the claimed step change in Perth area is given.
IGA Workshop: Dendroidal sets
14:00 Tue 12 Jun, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Ittay Weiss :: University of the South Pacific

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A series of four 2-hour lectures by Dr. Ittay Weiss. The theory of dendroidal sets was introduced by Moerdijk and Weiss in 2007 in the study of homotopy operads in algebraic topology. In the five years that have past since then several fundamental and highly non-trivial results were established. For instance, it was established that dendroidal sets provide models for homotopy operads in a way that extends the Joyal-Lurie approach to homotopy categories. It can be shown that dendroidal sets provide new models in the study of n-fold loop spaces. And it is very recently shown that dendroidal sets model all connective spectra in a way that extends the modeling of certain spectra by Picard groupoids. The aim of the lecture series will be to introduce the concepts mentioned above, present the elementary theory, and understand the scope of the results mentioned as well as discuss the potential for further applications. Sources for the course will include the article "From Operads to Dendroidal Sets" (in the AMS volume on mathematical foundations of quantum field theory (also on the arXiv)) and the lecture notes by Ieke Moerdijk "simplicial methods for operads and algebraic geometry" which resulted from an advanced course given in Barcelona 3 years ago. No prior knowledge of operads will be assumed nor any knowledge of homotopy theory that is more advanced then what is required for the definition of the fundamental group. The basics of the language of presheaf categories will be recalled quickly and used freely.
Comparison of spectral and wavelet estimators of transfer function for linear systems
12:10 Mon 18 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Mohd Aftar Abu Bakar :: University of Adelaide

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We compare spectral and wavelet estimators of the response amplitude operator (RAO) of a linear system, with various input signals and added noise scenarios. The comparison is based on a model of a heaving buoy wave energy device (HBWED), which oscillates vertically as a single mode of vibration linear system. HBWEDs and other single degree of freedom wave energy devices such as the oscillating wave surge convertors (OWSC) are currently deployed in the ocean, making single degree of freedom wave energy devices important systems to both model and analyse in some detail. However, the results of the comparison relate to any linear system. It was found that the wavelet estimator of the RAO offers no advantage over the spectral estimators if both input and response time series data are noise free and long time series are available. If there is noise on only the response time series, only the wavelet estimator or the spectral estimator that uses the cross-spectrum of the input and response signals in the numerator should be used. For the case of noise on only the input time series, only the spectral estimator that uses the cross-spectrum in the denominator gives a sensible estimate of the RAO. If both the input and response signals are corrupted with noise, a modification to both the input and response spectrum estimates can provide a good estimator of the RAO. However, a combination of wavelet and spectral methods is introduced as an alternative RAO estimator. The conclusions apply for autoregressive emulators of sea surface elevation, impulse, and pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS) inputs. However, a wavelet estimator is needed in the special case of a chirp input where the signal has a continuously varying frequency.
K-theory and unbounded Fredholm operators
13:10 Mon 9 Jul, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Jerry Kaminker :: University of California, Davis

There are several ways of viewing elements of K^1(X). One of these is via families of unbounded self-adjoint Fredholm operators on X. Each operator will have discrete spectrum, with infinitely many positive and negative eigenvalues of finite multiplicity. One can associate to such a family a geometric object, its graph, and the Chern character and other invariants of the family can be studied from this perspective. By restricting the dimension of the eigenspaces one may sometimes use algebraic topology to completely determine the family up to equivalence. This talk will describe the general framework and some applications to families on low-dimensional manifolds where the methods work well. Various notions related to spectral flow, the index gerbe and Berry phase play roles which will be discussed. This is joint work with Ron Douglas.
The Four Colour Theorem
11:10 Mon 23 Jul, 2012 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Vincent Schlegel :: University of Adelaide

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Arguably the most famous problem in discrete mathematics, the Four Colour Theorem was first conjectured in 1852 by South African mathematician Francis Guthrie. For 124 years, it defied many attempts to prove and disprove it. I will talk briefly about some of the rich history of this result, including some of the graph-theoretic techniques used in the 1976 Appel-Haken proof.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Twistor theory and the harmonic hull
15:10 Fri 8 Mar, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Michael Eastwood :: Australian National University

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Harmonic functions are real-analytic and so automatically extend as functions of complex variables. But how far do they extend? This question may be answered by twistor theory, the Penrose transform, and associated conformal geometry. Nothing will be supposed about such matters: I shall base the constructions on an elementary yet mysterious formula of Bateman from 1904. This is joint work with Feng Xu.
A glimpse at the Langlands program
15:10 Fri 12 Apr, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Masoud Kamgarpour :: University of Queensland

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Abstract: In the late 1960s, Robert Langlands made a series of surprising conjectures relating fundamental concepts from number theory, representation theory, and algebraic geometry. Langlands' conjectures soon developed into a high-profile international research program known as the Langlands program. Many fundamental problems, including the Shimura-Taniyama-Weil conjecture (partially settled by Andrew Wiles in his proof of the Fermat's Last Theorem), are particular cases of the Langlands program. In this talk, I will discuss some of the motivation and results in this program.
The boundary conditions for macroscale modelling of a discrete diffusion system with periodic diffusivity
12:10 Mon 29 Apr, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Chen Chen :: University of Adelaide

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Many mathematical and engineering problems have a multiscale nature. There are a vast of theories supporting multiscale modelling on infinite domain, such as homogenization theory and centre manifold theory. To date, there are little consideration of the correct boundary conditions to be used at the edge of macroscale model. In this seminar, I will present how to derive macroscale boundary conditions for the diffusion system.
Crystallographic groups I: the classical theory
12:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A discrete isometry group acting properly discontinuously on the n-dimensional Euclidean space with compact quotient is called a crystallographic group. This name reflects the fact that in dimension n=3 their compact fundamental domains resemble a space-filling crystal pattern. For higher dimensions, Hilbert posed his famous 18th problem: "Is there in n-dimensional Euclidean space only a finite number of essentially different kinds of groups of motions with a [compact] fundamental region?" This problem was solved by Bieberbach when he proved that in every dimension n there exists only a finite number of isomorphic crystallographic groups and also gave a description of these groups. From the perspective of differential geometry these results are of major importance, as crystallographic groups are precisely the fundamental groups of compact flat Riemannian orbifolds. The quotient is even a manifold if the fundamental group is required to be torsion-free, in which case it is called a Bieberbach group. Moreover, for a flat manifold the fundamental group completely determines the holonomy group. In this talk I will discuss the properties of crystallographic groups, study examples in dimension n=2 and n=3, and present the three Bieberbach theorems on the structure of crystallographic groups.
Progress in the prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence
15:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Daniel Chung :: University of Melbourne

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Buoyancy-affected turbulence represents a significant challenge to our understanding, yet it dominates many important flows that occur in the ocean and atmosphere. The presentation will highlight some recent progress in the characterisation, modelling and prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence using direct and large-eddy simulations, along with implications for the characterisation of mixing in the ocean and the low-cloud feedback in the atmosphere. Specifically, direct numerical simulation data of stratified turbulence will be employed to highlight the importance of boundaries in the characterisation of turbulent mixing in the ocean. Then, a subgrid-scale model that captures the anisotropic character of stratified mixing will be developed for large-eddy simulation of buoyancy-affected turbulence. Finally, the subgrid-scale model is utilised to perform a systematic large-eddy simulation investigation of the archetypal low-cloud regimes, from which the link between the lower-tropospheric stability criterion and the cloud fraction interpreted.
Crystallographic groups II: generalisations
12:10 Fri 24 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

The theory of crystallographic groups acting cocompactly on Euclidean space can be extended and generalised in many different ways. For example, instead of studying discrete groups of Euclidean isometries, one can consider groups of isometries for indefinite inner products. These are the fundamental groups of compact flat pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. Still more generally, one might study group of affine transformation on n-space that are not required to preserve any bilinear form. Also, the condition of cocompactness can be dropped. In this talk, I will present some of the results obtained for these generalisations, and also discuss some of my own work on flat homogeneous pseudo-Riemannian spaces.
Fire-Atmosphere Models
12:10 Mon 29 Jul, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mika Peace :: University of Adelaide

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Fire behaviour models are increasingly being used to assist in planning and operational decisions for bush fires and fuel reduction burns. Rate of spread (ROS) of the fire front is a key output of such models. The ROS value is typically calculated from a formula which has been derived from empirical data, using very simple meteorological inputs. We have used a coupled fire-atmosphere model to simulate real bushfire events. The results show that complex interactions between a fire and the atmosphere can have a significant influence on fire spread, thus highlighting the limitations of a model that uses simple meteorological inputs.
The Hamiltonian Cycle Problem and Markov Decision Processes
15:10 Fri 2 Aug, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Jerzy Filar :: Flinders University

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We consider the famous Hamiltonian cycle problem (HCP) embedded in a Markov decision process (MDP). More specifically, we consider a moving object on a graph G where, at each vertex, a controller may select an arc emanating from that vertex according to a probabilistic decision rule. A stationary policy is simply a control where these decision rules are time invariant. Such a policy induces a Markov chain on the vertices of the graph. Therefore, HCP is equivalent to a search for a stationary policy that induces a 0-1 probability transition matrix whose non-zero entries trace out a Hamiltonian cycle in the graph. A consequence of this embedding is that we may consider the problem over a number of, alternative, convex - rather than discrete - domains. These include: (a) the space of stationary policies, (b) the more restricted but, very natural, space of doubly stochastic matrices induced by the graph, and (c) the associated spaces of so-called "occupational measures". This approach to the HCP has led to both theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the underlying HCP problem. In this presentation, we outline a selection of results generated by this line of research.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Mon 16 Sep, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Raphael Ponge :: Seoul National University

In this talk we shall report on a program of using the recent framework of twisted spectral triples to study conformal geometry from a noncommutative geometric perspective. One result is a local index formula in conformal geometry taking into account the action of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms. Another result is a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality for twisted spectral triples. Geometric applications include a version of Vafa-Witten's inequality in conformal geometry. There are also noncommutative versions for spectral triples over noncommutative tori and duals of discrete cocompact subgroups of semisimple Lie groups satisfying the Baum-Connes conjecture. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Localised index and L^2-Lefschetz fixed point formula
12:10 Fri 25 Oct, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

In this talk we introduce a class of localised indices for the Dirac type operators on a complete Riemannian manifold, where a discrete group acts properly, co-compactly and isometrically. These localised indices, generalising the L^2-index of Atiyah, are obtained by taking Hattori-Stallings traces of the higher index for the Dirac type operators. We shall talk about some motivation and applications for working on localised indices. The talk is related to joint work with Bai-Ling Wang.
Viscoelastic fluids: mathematical challenges in determining their relaxation spectra
15:10 Mon 17 Mar, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Russell Davies :: Cardiff University

Determining the relaxation spectrum of a viscoelastic fluid is a crucial step before a linear or nonlinear constitutive model can be applied. Information about the relaxation spectrum is obtained from simple flow experiments such as creep or oscillatory shear. However, the determination process involves the solution of one or more highly ill-posed inverse problems. The availability of only discrete data, the presence of noise in the data, as well as incomplete data, collectively make the problem very hard to solve. In this talk I will illustrate the mathematical challenges inherent in determining relaxation spectra, and also introduce the method of wavelet regularization which enables the representation of a continuous relaxation spectrum by a set of hyperbolic scaling functions.
Outlier removal using the Bayesian information criterion for group-based trajectory modelling
12:10 Mon 28 Apr, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Chris Davies :: University of Adelaide

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Attributes measured longitudinally can be used to define discrete paths of measurements, or trajectories, for each individual in a given population. Group-based trajectory modelling methods can be used to identify subgroups of trajectories within a population, such that trajectories that are grouped together are more similar to each other than to trajectories in distinct groups. Existing methods generally allocate every individual trajectory into one of the estimated groups. However this does not allow for the possibility that some individuals may be following trajectories so different from the rest of the population that they should not be included in a group-based trajectory model. This results in these outlying trajectories being treated as though they belong to one of the groups, distorting the estimated trajectory groups and any subsequent analyses that use them. We have developed an algorithm for removing outlying trajectories based on the maximum change in Bayesian information criterion (BIC) due to removing a single trajectory. As well as deciding which trajectory to remove, the number of groups in the model can also change. The decision to remove an outlying trajectory is made by comparing the log-likelihood contributions of the observations to those of simulated samples from the estimated group-based trajectory model. In this talk the algorithm will be detailed and an application of its use will be demonstrated.
Ice floe collisions in the Marginal Ice Zone
12:10 Mon 12 May, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Lucas Yiew :: University of Adelaide

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In an era of climate change, it is becoming increasingly important to model the dynamics of sea-ice cover in the polar regions. The Marginal Ice Zone represents a vast region of ice cover strongly influenced by the effects of ocean waves. As ocean waves penetrate this region, wave energy is progressively dispersed through energy dissipative mechanisms such as collisions between ice floes (discrete chunks of ice). In this talk I will discuss the mathematical models required to build a collision model, and the validation of these models with experimental results.
The Bismut-Chern character as dimension reduction functor and its twisting
12:10 Fri 4 Jul, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Fei Han :: National University of Singapore

The Bismut-Chern character is a loop space refinement of the Chern character. It plays an essential role in the interpretation of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem from the point of view of loop space. In this talk, I will first briefly review the construction of the Bismut-Chern character and show how it can be viewed as a dimension reduction functor in the Stolz-Teichner program on supersymmetric quantum field theories. I will then introduce the construction of the twisted Bismut-Chern character, which represents our joint work with Varghese Mathai.
⌊ n!/e ⌉
14:10 Tue 9 Sep, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr. David Butler :: Maths Learning Centre

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What is this formula? Why does it use those strangely mismatched brackets, and why does it use both factorial and the number e? What is it supposed to calculate? And why would someone love it so much that they put it on a t-shirt? In this seminar you will find out the answers to all of these questions, and also find out what derangements have to do with Taylor's theorem.
A Random Walk Through Discrete State Markov Chain Theory
12:10 Mon 22 Sep, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: James Walker :: University of Adelaide

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This talk will go through the basics of Markov chain theory; including how to construct a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC), how to adapt a Markov chain to include non-memoryless distributions, how to simulate CTMC's and some key results.
Nonlinear analysis over infinite dimensional spaces and its applications
12:10 Fri 6 Feb, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Tsuyoshi Kato :: Kyoto University

In this talk we develop moduli theory of holomorphic curves over infinite dimensional manifolds consisted by sequences of almost Kaehler manifolds. Under the assumption of high symmetry, we verify that many mechanisms of the standard moduli theory over closed symplectic manifolds also work over these infinite dimensional spaces. As an application, we study deformation theory of discrete groups acting on trees. There is a canonical way, up to conjugacy to embed such groups into the automorphism group over the infinite projective space. We verify that for some class of Hamiltonian functions, the deformed groups must be always asymptotically infinite.
Multiscale modelling of multicellular biological systems: mechanics, development and disease
03:10 Fri 6 Mar, 2015 :: Lower Napier LG24 :: Dr James Osborne :: University of Melbourne

When investigating the development and function of multicellular biological systems it is not enough to only consider the behaviour of individual cells in isolation. For example when studying tissue development, how individual cells interact, both mechanically and biochemically, influences the resulting tissues form and function. In this talk we present a multiscale modelling framework for simulating the development and function of multicellular biological systems (in particular tissues). Utilising the natural structural unit of the cell, the framework consists of three main scales: the tissue level (macro-scale); the cell level (meso-scale); and the sub-cellular level (micro-scale), with multiple interactions occurring between all scales. The cell level is central to the framework and cells are modelled as discrete interacting entities using one of a number of possible modelling paradigms, including lattice based models (cellular automata and cellular Potts) and off-lattice based models (cell centre and vertex based representations). The sub-cellular level concerns numerous metabolic and biochemical processes represented by interaction networks rendered stochastically or into ODEs. The outputs from such systems influence the behaviour of the cell level affecting properties such as adhesion and also influencing cell mitosis and apoptosis. At the tissue level we consider factors or restraints that influence the cells, for example the distribution of a nutrient or messenger molecule, which is represented by field equations, on a growing domain, with individual cells functioning as sinks and/or sources. The modular approach taken within the framework enables more realistic behaviour to be considered at each scale. This framework is implemented within the Open Source Chaste library (Cancer Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, (http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/) and has been used to model biochemical and biomechanical interactions in various biological systems. In this talk we present the key ideas of the framework along with applications within the fields of development and disease.
Higher rank discrete Nahm equations for SU(N) monopoles in hyperbolic space
11:10 Wed 8 Apr, 2015 :: Engineering & Maths EM213 :: Joseph Chan :: University of Melbourne

Braam and Austin in 1990, proved that SU(2) magnetic monopoles in hyperbolic space H^3 are the same as solutions of the discrete Nahm equations. I apply equivariant K-theory to the ADHM construction of instantons/holomorphic bundles to extend the Braam-Austin result from SU(2) to SU(N). During its evolution, the matrices of the higher rank discrete Nahm equations jump in dimensions and this behaviour has not been observed in discrete evolution equations before. A secondary result is that the monopole field at the boundary of H^3 determines the monopole.
Modelling terrorism risk - can we predict future trends?
12:10 Mon 10 Aug, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Stephen Crotty :: University of Adelaide

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As we are all aware, the incidence of terrorism is increasing in the world today. This is confirmed when viewing terrorism events since 1970 as a time series. Can we model this increasing trend and use it to predict terrorism events in the future? Probably not, but we'll give it a go anyway.
Modelling Directionality in Stationary Geophysical Time Series
12:10 Mon 12 Oct, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Mohd Mahayaudin Mansor :: University of Adelaide

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Many time series show directionality inasmuch as plots again-st time and against time-to-go are qualitatively different, and there is a range of statistical tests to quantify this effect. There are two strategies for allowing for directionality in time series models. Linear models are reversible if and only if the noise terms are Gaussian, so one strategy is to use linear models with non-Gaussian noise. The alternative is to use non-linear models. We investigate how non-Gaussian noise affects directionality in a first order autoregressive process AR(1) and compare this with a threshold autoregressive model with two thresholds. The findings are used to suggest possible improvements to an AR(9) model, identified by an AIC criterion, for the average yearly sunspot numbers from 1700 to 1900. The improvement is defined in terms of one-step-ahead forecast errors from 1901 to 2014.
Ocean dynamics of Gulf St Vincent: a numerical study
12:10 Mon 2 Nov, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Henry Ellis :: University of Adelaide

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The aim of this research is to determine the physical dynamics of ocean circulation within Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, and the exchange of momentum, nutrients, heat, salt and other water properties between the gulf and shelf via Investigator Strait and Backstairs Passage. The project aims to achieve this through the creation of high-resolution numerical models, combined with new and historical observations from a moored instrument package, satellite data, and shipboard surveys. The quasi-realistic high-resolution models are forced using boundary conditions generated by existing larger scale ROMS models, which in turn are forced at the boundary by a global model, creating a global to regional to local model network. Climatological forcing is done using European Centres for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) data sets and is consistent over the regional and local models. A series of conceptual models are used to investigate the relative importance of separate physical processes in addition to fully forced quasi-realistic models. An outline of the research to be undertaken is given: • Connectivity of Gulf St. Vincent with shelf waters including seasonal variation due to wind and thermoclinic patterns; • The role of winter time cooling and formation of eddies in flushing the gulf; • The formation of a temperature front within the gulf during summer time; and • The connectivity and importance of nutrient rich, cool, water upwelling from the Bonney Coast with the gulf via Backstairs Passage during summer time.
A fixed point theorem on noncompact manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide / Radboud University

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For an elliptic operator on a compact manifold acted on by a compact Lie group, the Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point formula expresses its equivariant index in terms of data on fixed point sets of group elements. This can for example be used to prove Weyl’s character formula. We extend the definition of the equivariant index to noncompact manifolds, and prove a generalisation of the Atiyah-Segal-Singer formula, for group elements with compact fixed point sets. In one example, this leads to a relation with characters of discrete series representations of semisimple Lie groups. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
Chaos in dimensions 2 and 3
15:10 Fri 18 Mar, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Andy Hammerlindl :: Monash University

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I will talk about known models of chaotic dynamical systems in dimensions two and three, and results which classify the types of chaotic dynamics that are robust under perturbation. I will also talk about my own work towards understanding chaotic dynamics for discrete-time systems in dimension three. This is joint work with C. Bonatti, A. Gogolev, and R. Potrie.
Counting periodic points of plane Cremona maps
12:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Tuyen Truong :: University of Adelaide

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In this talk, I will present recent results, join with Tien-Cuong Dinh and Viet-Anh Nguyen, on counting periodic points of plane Cremona maps (i.e. birational maps of P^2). The tools used include a Lefschetz fixed point formula of Saito, Iwasaki and Uehara for birational maps of surface whose fixed point set may contain curves; a bound on the arithmetic genus of curves of periodic points by Diller, Jackson and Sommerse; a result by Diller, Dujardin and Guedj on invariant (1,1) currents of meromorphic maps of compact Kahler surfaces; and a theory developed recently by Dinh and Sibony for non proper intersections of varieties. Among new results in the paper, we give a complete characterisation of when two positive closed (1,1) currents on a compact Kahler surface behave nicely in the view of Dinh and Sibony’s theory, even if their wedge intersection may not be well-defined with respect to the classical pluripotential theory. Time allows, I will present some generalisations to meromorphic maps (including an upper bound for the number of isolated periodic points which is sometimes overlooked in the literature) and open questions.
How to count Betti numbers
12:10 Fri 6 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

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I will begin this talk by showing how to obtain the Betti numbers of certain smooth complex projective varieties by counting points over a finite field. For singular or non-compact varieties this motivates us to consider the "virtual Hodge numbers" encoded by the "Hodge-Deligne polynomial", a refinement of the topological Euler characteristic. I will then discuss the computation of Hodge-Deligne polynomials for certain singular character varieties (i.e. moduli spaces of flat connections).
Time series analysis of paleo-climate proxies (a mathematical perspective)
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Thomas Stemler :: University of Western Australia

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In this talk I will present the work my colleagues from the School of Earth and Environment (UWA), the "trans disciplinary methods" group of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany, and I did to explain the dynamics of the Australian-South East Asian monsoon system during the last couple of thousand years. From a time series perspective paleo-climate proxy series are more or less the monsters moving under your bed that wake you up in the middle of the night. The data is clearly non-stationary, non-uniform sampled in time and the influence of stochastic forcing or the level of measurement noise are more or less unknown. Given these undesirable properties almost all traditional time series analysis methods fail. I will highlight two methods that allow us to draw useful conclusions from the data sets. The first one uses Gaussian kernel methods to reconstruct climate networks from multiple proxies. The coupling relationships in these networks change over time and therefore can be used to infer which areas of the monsoon system dominate the complex dynamics of the whole system. Secondly I will introduce the transformation cost time series method, which allows us to detect changes in the dynamics of a non-uniform sampled time series. Unlike the frequently used interpolation approach, our new method does not corrupt the data and therefore avoids biases in any subsequence analysis. While I will again focus on paleo-climate proxies, the method can be used in other applied areas, where regular sampling is not possible.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Calculus on symplectic manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Aug, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Mike Eastwood :: University of Adelaide

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One can use the symplectic form to construct an elliptic complex replacing the de Rham complex. Then, under suitable curvature conditions, one can form coupled versions of this complex. Finally, on complex projective space, these constructions give rise to a series of elliptic complexes with geometric consequences for the Fubini-Study metric and its X-ray transform. This talk, which will start from scratch, is based on the work of many authors but, especially, current joint work with Jan Slovak.
Character Formula for Discrete Series
12:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B18 :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

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Weyl character formula describes characters of irreducible representations of compact Lie groups. This formula can be obtained using geometric method, for example, from the Atiyah-Bott fixed point theorem or the Atiyah-Segal-Singer index theorem. Harish-Chandra character formula, the noncompact analogue of the Weyl character formula, can also be studied from the point of view of index theory. We apply orbital integrals on K-theory of Harish-Chandra Schwartz algebra of a semisimple Lie group G, and then use geometric method to deduce Harish-Chandra character formulas for discrete series representations of G. This is work in progress with Peter Hochs.
Segregation of particles in incompressible flows due to streamline topology and particle-boundary interaction
15:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Professor Hendrik C. Kuhlmann :: Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, TU Wien, Vienna, Austria

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The incompressible flow in a number of classical benchmark problems (e.g. lid-driven cavity, liquid bridge) undergoes an instability from a two-dimensional steady to a periodic three-dimensional flow, which is steady or in form of a traveling wave, if the Reynolds number is increased. In the supercritical regime chaotic as well as regular (quasi-periodic) streamlines can coexist for a range of Reynolds numbers. The spatial structures of the regular regions in three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows has received relatively little attention, partly because of the high numerical effort required for resolving these structures. Particles whose density does not differ much from that of the liquid approximately follow the chaotic or regular streamlines in the bulk. Near the boundaries, however, their trajectories strongly deviate from the streamlines, in particular if the boundary (wall or free surface) is moving tangentially. As a result of this particle-boundary interaction particles can rapidly segregate and be attracted to periodic or quasi-periodic orbits, yielding particle accumulation structures (PAS). The mechanism of PAS will be explained and results from experiments and numerical modelling will be presented to demonstrate the generic character of the phenomenon.
K-types of tempered representations
12:10 Fri 7 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of a reductive Lie group G are the irreducible unitary representations one needs in the Plancherel decomposition of L^2(G). They are relevant to harmonic analysis because of this, and also occur in the Langlands classification of the larger class of admissible representations. If K in G is a maximal compact subgroup, then there is a considerable amount of information in the restriction of a tempered representation to K. In joint work with Yanli Song and Shilin Yu, we give a geometric expression for the decomposition of such a restriction into irreducibles. The multiplicities of these irreducibles are expressed as indices of Dirac operators on reduced spaces of a coadjoint orbit of G corresponding to the representation. These reduced spaces are Spin-c analogues of reduced spaces in symplectic geometry, defined in terms of moment maps that represent conserved quantities. This result involves a Spin-c version of the quantisation commutes with reduction principle for noncompact manifolds. For discrete series representations, this was done by Paradan in 2003.
Stokes' Phenomenon in Translating Bubbles
15:10 Fri 2 Jun, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Dr Chris Lustri :: Macquarie University

This study of translating air bubbles in a Hele-Shaw cell containing viscous fluid reveals the critical role played by surface tension in these systems. The standard zero-surface-tension model of Hele-Shaw flow predicts that a continuum of bubble solutions exists for arbitrary flow translation velocity. The inclusion of small surface tension, however, eliminates this continuum of solutions, instead producing a discrete, countably infinite family of solutions, each with distinct translation speeds. We are interested in determining this discrete family of solutions, and understanding why only these solutions are permitted. Studying this problem in the asymptotic limit of small surface tension does not seem to give any particular reason why only these solutions should be selected. It is only by using exponential asymptotic methods to study the Stokes’ structure hidden in the problem that we are able to obtain a complete picture of the bubble behaviour, and hence understand the selection mechanism that only permits certain solutions to exist. In the first half of my talk, I will explain the powerful ideas that underpin exponential asymptotic techniques, such as analytic continuation and optimal truncation. I will show how they are able to capture behaviour known as Stokes' Phenomenon, which is typically invisible to classical asymptotic series methods. In the second half of the talk, I will introduce the problem of a translating air bubble in a Hele-Shaw cell, and show that the behaviour can be fully understood by examining the Stokes' structure concealed within the problem. Finally, I will briefly showcase other important physical applications of exponential asymptotic methods, including submarine waves and particle chains.
Quaternionic Kaehler manifolds of co-homogeneity one
12:10 Fri 16 Jun, 2017 :: Ligertwood 231 :: Vicente Cortes :: Universitat Hamburg

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Quaternionic Kaehler manifolds form an important class of Riemannian manifolds of special holonomy. They provide examples of Einstein manifolds of non-zero scalar curvature. I will show how to construct explicit examples of complete quaternionic Kaehler manifolds of negative scalar curvature beyond homogeneous spaces. In particular, I will present a series of examples of co-homogeneity one, based on arXiv:1701.07882.
Equivariant formality of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 29 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Alex Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

Equivariant formality, a notion in equivariant topology introduced by Goresky-Kottwitz-Macpherson, is a desirable property of spaces with group actions, which allows the application of localisation formula to evaluate integrals of any top closed forms and enables one to compute easily the equivariant cohomology. Broad classes of spaces of especial interest are well-known to be equivariantly formal, e.g., compact symplectic manifolds equipped with Hamiltonian compact Lie group actions and projective varieties equipped with linear algebraic torus actions, of which flag varieties are examples. Less is known about compact homogeneous spaces G/K equipped with the isotropy action of K, which is not necessarily of maximal rank. In this talk we will review previous attempts of characterizing equivariant formality of G/K, and present our recent results on this problem using an analogue of equivariant formality in K-theory. Part of the work presented in this talk is joint with Jeffrey Carlson.
Understanding burn injuries and first aid treatment using simple mathematical models
15:10 Fri 13 Oct, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Mat Simpson :: Queensland University of Technology

Scald burns from accidental exposure to hot liquids are the most common cause of burn injury in children. Over 2000 children are treated for accidental burn injuries in Australia each year. Despite the frequency of these injuries, basic questions about the physics of heat transfer in living tissues remain unanswered. For example, skin thickness varies with age and anatomical location, yet our understanding of how tissue damage from thermal injury is influenced by skin thickness is surprisingly limited. In this presentation we will consider a series of porcine experiments to study heat transfer in living tissues. We consider burning the living tissue, as well as applying various first aid treatment strategies to cool the living tissue after injury. By calibrating solutions of simple mathematical models to match the experimental data we provide insight into how thermal energy propagates through living tissues, as well as exploring different first aid strategies. We conclude by outlining some of our current work that aims to produce more realistic mathematical models.
Springer correspondence for symmetric spaces
12:10 Fri 17 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Ting Xue :: University of Melbourne

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The Springer theory for reductive algebraic groups plays an important role in representation theory. It relates nilpotent orbits in the Lie algebra to irreducible representations of the Weyl group. We develop a Springer theory in the case of symmetric spaces using Fourier transform, which relates nilpotent orbits in this setting to irreducible representations of Hecke algebras of various Coxeter groups with specified parameters. This in turn gives rise to character sheaves on symmetric spaces, which we describe explicitly in the case of classical symmetric spaces. A key ingredient in the construction is the nearby cycle sheaves associated to the adjoint quotient map. The talk is based on joint work with Kari Vilonen and partly based on joint work with Misha Grinberg and Kari Vilonen.
Stochastic Modelling of Urban Structure
11:10 Mon 20 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N132 :: Mark Girolami :: Imperial College London, and The Alan Turing Institute

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Urban systems are complex in nature and comprise of a large number of individuals that act according to utility, a measure of net benefit pertaining to preferences. The actions of individuals give rise to an emergent behaviour, creating the so-called urban structure that we observe. In this talk, I develop a stochastic model of urban structure to formally account for uncertainty arising from the complex behaviour. We further use this stochastic model to infer the components of a utility function from observed urban structure. This is a more powerful modelling framework in comparison to the ubiquitous discrete choice models that are of limited use for complex systems, in which the overall preferences of individuals are difficult to ascertain. We model urban structure as a realization of a Boltzmann distribution that is the invariant distribution of a related stochastic differential equation (SDE) that describes the dynamics of the urban system. Our specification of Boltzmann distribution assigns higher probability to stable configurations, in the sense that consumer surplus (demand) is balanced with running costs (supply), as characterized by a potential function. We specify a Bayesian hierarchical model to infer the components of a utility function from observed structure. Our model is doubly-intractable and poses significant computational challenges that we overcome using recent advances in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. We demonstrate our methodology with case studies on the London retail system and airports in England.
A Hecke module structure on the KK-theory of arithmetic groups
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Bram Mesland :: University of Bonn

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Let $G$ be a locally compact group, $\Gamma$ a discrete subgroup and $C_{G}(\Gamma)$ the commensurator of $\Gamma$ in $G$. The cohomology of $\Gamma$ is a module over the Shimura Hecke ring of the pair $(\Gamma,C_G(\Gamma))$. This construction recovers the action of the Hecke operators on modular forms for $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$ as a particular case. In this talk I will discuss how the Shimura Hecke ring of a pair $(\Gamma, C_{G}(\Gamma))$ maps into the $KK$-ring associated to an arbitrary $\Gamma$-C*-algebra. From this we obtain a variety of $K$-theoretic Hecke modules. In the case of manifolds the Chern character provides a Hecke equivariant transformation into cohomology, which is an isomorphism in low dimensions. We discuss Hecke equivariant exact sequences arising from possibly noncommutative compactifications of $\Gamma$-spaces. Examples include the Borel-Serre and geodesic compactifications of the universal cover of an arithmetic manifold, and the totally disconnected boundary of the Bruhat-Tits tree of $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$. This is joint work with M.H. Sengun (Sheffield).
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.
Discrete fluxes and duality in gauge theory
11:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Siye Wu :: National Tsinghua University

We explore the notions of discrete electric and magnetic fluxes introduced by 't Hooft in the late 1970s. After explaining their physics origin, we consider the description in mathematical terminology. We finally study their role in duality.
Twisted K-theory of compact Lie groups and extended Verlinde algebras
11:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

In a series of recent papers, Freed, Hopkins and Teleman put forth a deep result which identifies the twisted K -theory of a compact Lie group G with the representation theory of its loop group LG. Under suitable conditions, both objects can be enhanced to the Verlinde algebra, which appears in mathematical physics as the Frobenius algebra of a certain topological quantum field theory, and in algebraic geometry as the algebra encoding information of moduli spaces of G-bundles over Riemann surfaces. The Verlinde algebra for G with nice connectedness properties have been well-known. However, explicit descriptions of such for disconnected G are lacking. In this talk, I will discuss the various aspects of the Freed-Hopkins-Teleman Theorem and partial results on an extension of the Verlinde algebra arising from a disconnected G. The talk is based on work in progress joint with David Baraglia and Varghese Mathai.

News matching "Character Formula for Discrete Series"

IGA Lecture Series by Professor Dan Freed
The School of Mathematical Sciences will host a series of lectures by Professor Dan Freed (University of Texas, Austin) as part of an upcoming IGA/AMSI workshop, October 18-22, 2010. Details of the workshop can be found here. Posted Tue 5 Oct 10.
ARC Future Fellowship success
Associate Professor Zudi Lu has been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship. Associate Professor Lu, and Associate Professor in Statistics, will use the support provided by his Future Fellowship to further improve the theory and practice of econometric modelling of nonlinear spatial time series. Congratulations Zudi. Posted Thu 12 May 11.
IGA-AMSI Workshop: Group-valued moment maps with applications to mathematics and physics
(5–9 September 2011) Lecture series by Eckhard Meinrenken, University of Toronto. Titles of individual lectures: 1) Introduction to G-valued moment maps. 2) Dirac geometry and Witten's volume formulas. 3) Dixmier-Douady theory and pre-quantization. 4) Quantization of group-valued moment maps. 5) Application to Verlinde formulas. These lectures will be supplemented by additional talks by invited speakers. For more details, please see the conference webpage Posted Wed 27 Jul 11.

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Dualities in field theories and the role of K-theory
Between Monday 19 and Friday 23 March 2012, the Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a lecture series by Professor Jonathan Rosenberg from the University of Maryland. There will be additional talks by other invited speakers. Posted Tue 6 Dec 11.

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The mathematical implications of gauge-string dualities
Between Monday 5 and Friday 9 March 2012, the Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a lecture series by Rajesh Gopakumar from the Harish-Chandra Research Institute. These lectures will be supplemented by talks by other invited speakers. Posted Tue 6 Dec 11.

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Publications matching "Character Formula for Discrete Series"

Publications
Adaptively varying-coefficient spatiotemporal models
Lu, Zudi; Steinskog, D; Tjostheim, D; Yao, Q, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B-Statistical Methodology 71 (859–880) 2009
The maximum size of the intersection of two ovoids
Butler, David, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 116 (242–245) 2009
A discrete version of the Riemann Hilbert problem
Larusson, Finnur; Sadykov, T, Russian Mathematical Surveys 63 (973–975) 2008
D-branes, KK-theory and duality on noncommutative spaces
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Print Edition) 103 (1–13) 2008
Discrete-time expectation maximization algorithms for Markov-modulated poisson processes
Elliott, Robert; Malcolm, William, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control 53 (247–256) 2008
A combinatorial formula for homogeneous moments
Eastwood, Michael; Romao, Nuno, Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 142 (153–160) 2007
Statistics in review; Part 2: Generalised linear models, time-to-event and time-series analysis, evidence synthesis and clinical trials
Moran, John; Solomon, Patricia, Critical care and Resuscitation 9 (187–197) 2007
The multivariate Faa di Bruno formula and multivariate Taylor expansions with explicit integral remainder term
Leipnik, R; Pearce, Charles, The ANZIAM Journal 48 (327–341) 2007
Nonlinear dynamics on centre manifolds describing turbulent floods: k-omega model
Georgiev, D; Roberts, Anthony John; Strunin, D, Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems Supplement (419–428) 2007
Data-recursive smoother formulae for partially observed discrete-time Markov chains
Elliott, Robert; Malcolm, William, Stochastic Analysis and Applications 24 (579–597) 2006
Flock generalized quadrangles and tetradic sets of elliptic quadrics of PG(3, q)
Barwick, Susan; Brown, Matthew; Penttila, T, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 113 (273–290) 2006
Kato's inequality and asymptotic spectral properties for discrete magnetic Laplacians
Dodziuk, Josef; Varghese, Mathai, Contemporary Mathematics 398 (69–82) 2006
Linear transformations on codes
Glynn, David; Gulliver, T; Gupta, M, Discrete Mathematics 306 (1871–1880) 2006
Some Penrose transforms in complex differential geometry
Anco, S; Bland, J; Eastwood, Michael, Science in China Series A-Mathematics Physics Astronomy 49 (1599–1610) 2006
Three-dimensional flow due to a microcantilever oscillating near a wall: an unsteady slender-body analysis
Clarke, Richard; Jensen, O; Billingham, J; Williams, P, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 462 (913–933) 2006
Exact smoothers for discrete-time hybrid stochastic systems
Elliott, Robert; Malcolm, William; Dufour, F, The 44th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control and the European Control Conference, Seville, Spain 12/12/05
New Gaussian mixture state estimation schemes for discrete time hybrid Gauss-Markov systems
Elliott, Robert; Dufour, F; Malcolm, William, The 2005 American Control Conference, Portland, OR, USA 08/06/05
Examples of unbounded homogeneous domains in complex space
Eastwood, Michael; Isaev, A, Science in China Series A-Mathematics Physics Astronomy 48 (248–261) 2005
Generalized quadrangles and regularity
Brown, Matthew, Discrete Mathematics 294 (25–42) 2005
State and mode estimation for discrete-time jump Markov systems
Elliott, Robert; Dufour, F; Malcolm, William, Siam Journal on Control and Optimization 44 (1081–1104) 2005
Filtering, smoothing and M-ary detection with discrete time poisson observations
Elliott, Robert; Malcolm, William; Aggoun, L, Stochastic Analysis and Applications 23 (939–952) 2005
Characters of the discrete Heisenberg group and of its completion
Tandra, Haryono; Moran, W, Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 136 (525–539) 2004
Kirillov theory for a class of discrete nilpotent groups
Tandra, Haryono; Moran, W, Canadian Journal of Mathematics-Journal Canadien de Mathematiques 56 (883–896) 2004
Macrophage-tumour interactions: In vivo dynamics
Byrne, H; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, C, Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems-Series B 4 (81–98) 2004
On the boundary-layer equations for power-law fluids
Denier, James; Dabrowski, Paul, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 460 (3143–3158) 2004
Subquadrangles of order s of generalized quadrangles of order (s, s2), Part I
Brown, Matthew; Thas, J, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 106 (15–32) 2004
Subquadrangles of order s of generalized quadrangles of order (s, s2), Part II
Brown, Matthew; Thas, J, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 106 (33–48) 2004
Development of Non-Homogeneous and Hierarchical Hidden Markov Models for Modelling Monthly Rainfall and Streamflow Time Series
Whiting, Julian; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew; Kuczera, George, World Water and Environmental Resources Congress (2004), Salt Lake City, Utah, USA 27/06/04
Arbitrage in a Discrete Version of the Wick-Fractional Black Scholes Model
Bender, C; Elliott, Robert, Mathematics of Operations Research 29 (935–945) 2004
An approximate formula for the stress intensity factor for the pressurized star crack
Clements, David; Widana, Inyoman, Mathematical and Computer Modelling 37 (689–694) 2003
Chern character in twisted K-theory: Equivariant and holomorphic cases
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 236 (161–186) 2003
Seiberg-Witten-Floer homology and Gluing formulae
Carey, Alan; Wang, Bai-Ling, Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series 19 (245–296) 2003
Decay rates of discrete phase-type distributions with infinitely-many phases
Bean, Nigel; Nielsen, B, Matrix-Analytic Methods Theory and Applications, Adelaide, Australia 14/07/02
Sequential Monte Carlo state estimation for Poisson observations at discrete times
Malcolm, William; Gordon, N, Data and Information Fusion Symposium, Signal Processing and Communications Symposium and Decision and Control Symposium, Adelaide, Australia 11/02/02
On-line almost-sure parameter estimation for partially observed discrete-time linear systems with known noise characteristics
Elliott, Robert; Ford, J; Moore, J, International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing 16 (435–453) 2002
Ruled cubic surfaces in PG(4, q), Baer subplanes of PG(2, q2) and Hermitian curves
Casse, Rey; Quinn, Catherine, Discrete Mathematics 248 (17–25) 2002
Towards the inverse of a word
Clarke, Robert, Discrete Mathematics 256 (595–607) 2002
Improved smoother dynamics for discrete time HMM parameter estimation
Elliott, Robert; Malcolm, William, The 40th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), Orlando, Florida 04/12/01
Some constructions of small generalized polygons
Polster, Burkhard; Van Maldeghem, H, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 96 (162–179) 2001
Subquadrangles of generalized quadrangles of order (q2, q), q Even
O'Keefe, Christine; Penttila, T, Journal of Combinatorial Theory Series A 94 (218–229) 2001
Hidden state Markov chain time series models for arid zone hydrology
Cigizoglu, K; Adamson, Peter; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew, International Symposium on Water Resources and Environmental Impact Assessment (2001), Istanbul, Turkey 11/07/01
Hadamard and Dragomir-Agarwal inequalities, higher-order convexity and the Euler formula
Dedio, L; Pearce, Charles; Peoario, J, Journal of the Korean Mathematical Society (–) 2001
Information entropy and Parrondo's discrete-time ratchet
Harmer, Gregory; Abbott, Derek; Taylor, Peter; Pearce, Charles; Parrondo, J, Stochastic and Chaotic Dynamics in the Lakes - STOCHAOS, Ambleside, Cumbria, UK 01/08/99
Parrondo's paradoxical games and the discrete Brownian ratchet
Harmer, Gregory; Abbott, Derek; Taylor, Peter; Parrondo, J, Unsolved Problems of Noise and Fluctuations, Adelaide, Australia 12/07/99
Flowing windowpanes: a comparison of Newtonian and Maxwell fluid models
Stokes, Yvonne, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 456 (1861–1864) 2000
On the complete integrability of the discrete Nahm equations
Murray, Michael; Singer, Michael, Communications in Mathematical Physics 210 (497–519) 2000
On the discrete and continuous Miura chain associated with the sixth Painlev equation
Nijhoff, F; Joshi, Nalini; Hone, Andrew, Physics Letters A 264 (396–406) 2000
The paradox of Parrondo's games
Harmer, Gregory; Abbott, Derek; Taylor, Peter, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences 456 (247–259) 2000

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